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Usually, October is the month where movie studios start pouring horror flicks into the laps of gore-hungry audiences. But horror is more than just knives and ghosts and monsters and blood blood blood; just this last weekend, James Wan's The Conjuring scared the shit out of $40 million worth of people in its opening weekend. Plus, there's a fifth Paranormal Activity movie coming in 2014.

But for me - and this might have something to do with the fact I consider ALIEN to be the best horror movie ever made - outer-space is the scariest place. And this October, Alfonso Cuaron, director of Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban and the sci-fi classic (yes, already) Children of Men will release Gravity, starring George Clooney and Sandra Bullock.

Warner Bros. has been promoting this movie in an interesting way. No trailers, no commercials. Just 90 second scenes of Clooney and Bullock stranded in space, scared out of their mind, trying to figure out ways to be un-stranded in space that don't include "burning up in the Earth's Atmosphere" or "Getting hit by a passing satellite"

They've released two clips so far, and today saw the release of a third. I'll be posting them in order after the jump, so if you want to go into the film without a single frame of film lodged in your memory banks, you can just mosey along. But if you want to get just a little bit scared, please: Proceed. I promise you that even if you watch the following three clips, there's still a good 90+ minutes of Gravity you still won't have seen by the time October rolls around.

Clip 1: Drifting

Clip 2: Detached

Clip 3: I've Got You

Cuaron mentioned at the San Diego Trailer & Advertising Expo this past weekend that while this marketing material does feature sound-effects in space, the movie will have none of that. The film will also be made up of a series of long, single-take shots, much like Children of Men. In fact, Gravity will open with a single 17 minute unbroken shot.

Of course, a lot of this shit is scary because most of us are led to believe that human exposure to the vaccuum of space will cause a body to simultaneously inflate, boil, and explode while freezing, usually within 30 seconds. To help make you feel a little bit better, here's a quote from NASA experts, straight from their site, about what actually happens:

"If you don't try to hold your breath, exposure to space for half a minute or so is unlikely to produce permanent injury. Holding your breath is likely to damage your lungs, something scuba divers have to watch out for when ascending, and you'll have eardrum trouble if your Eustachian tubes are badly plugged up, but theory predicts — and animal experiments confirm — that otherwise, exposure to vacuum causes no immediate injury. You do not explode. Your blood does not boil. You do not freeze. You do not instantly lose consciousness.

At NASA's Manned Spacecraft Center (now renamed Johnson Space Center) we had a test subject accidentally exposed to a near vacuum (less than 1 psi) in an incident involving a leaking space suit in a vacuum chamber back in '65. He remained conscious for about 14 seconds, which is about the time it takes for O2 deprived blood to go from the lungs to the brain. The suit probably did not reach a hard vacuum, and we began repressurizing the chamber within 15 seconds. The subject regained consciousness at around 15,000 feet equivalent altitude. The subject later reported that he could feel and hear the air leaking out, and his last conscious memory was of the water on his tongue beginning to boil."

But if reading isn't your thing, here's a helpful video from The Sci Show explaining exactly what would happen if you were George Clooney or Sandra Bullock, and you found yourself stranded in space. SPOILERS: It's not like that scene you saw in Event Horizon.

Gravity opens October 4th.