THE WORKS Review: Experimental 1/2 Hour

Comments

1
moire patterns on paper>digital camera input>max/msp/jitter patch> projector and ears
2
Lucky Dragons: Was that a light-sensitive theramin? It was cool that they were creating moire. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moir%C3%A9_pa…

Experimental half hour has a vimeo. http://vimeo.com/experimentalpdx One can only hope they'll put some of the performances up. I am crazy to see the Princess Dies video again. Did I ever know such contentment before I watched Ashby Lee Collinson run around with her braid attached to a large helium balloon?

As the dude taping up that bottle was mislabeled. So who was that?
3
I think they were doing something with light controllers-- manipulated by what the host described as live moire-- selecting frequency and oscillation ranges and applying those parameters to values of light and dark. I spoke with Abe Ingle after the performance and he knew a lot more about the types of input devices that I've seen Lucky Dragons use in this and past performances (tune-yards' release show for Bird Brains resulted in a Lucky Dragon set where the audience controlled synths with rocks and an input device that manipulated sound via human touch-- in the end, a pile of people were writhing on the floor of Holocene, the sound reflecting the cumulative, touchy-feely human mass.)

I bet Abe could talk more on this in technical terms-- you out there Abe? Fill us in!
4
I didn't get a close look, but I suspect that they're using Max MSP and possibly also Ableton Live. It's hard to gauge exactly how a shadow equates to a change in sound (it could have all been pre-recorded for all we know,) but it appeared that simple light sensitive sensors were wired up to alter elements of the synthesizer sounds. If people like Lucky Dragons and other acts that use non-traditional interfaces - I would HIGHLY suggest doing some research into mid-20th century electronic music. No dissing on Lucky Dragons, etc... who make no claims to be doing 100% original stuff - but none of this stuff is remotely new, just forgotten. Conceptual sound artists have been doing work like this (but with -gasp- conceptual underpinnings) for 70 years now. Interested parties should look up Karlheinz Stockhausen, Morton Subotnick, and Wendy Carlos
-abe