DEERHOOF, NEAL MORGAN (6 PM); DEERHOOF, BEN BUTLER AND MOUSEPAD (9:30 PM)

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) The swirling art-pop sounds of Deerhoof are no stranger to Portlanders; that's why the charismatic San Francisco band is pulling a double shift tonight in support of their new Deerhoof vs. Evil recording. The first show is for the kiddies, then things get boozy for a 21-plus performance. EZRA ACE CARAEFF


LOCH LOMOND, RAMONA FALLS

(Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 NE Alberta) Read our article about Loch Lomond.


TED LEO, FORBIDDEN FRIENDS

(Backspace, 115 NW 5th) Bon Jovi made $201 million last year. That astronomic number is solely from 80 dates on the road (it does not include their catalog sales, nor does it factor in the cost of Tico Torres' hair plugs). I mention this not because it's soul-crushingly unfair—it is, we all know this—but because Ted Leo recently implied that he's near the end of his run due to financial concerns. The Jersey rocker behind Chisel and an incredible string of releases—both solo and backed by the Pharmacists—Leo admitted in a 2010 interview that he was exhausted from sluggish record sales and the sheer financial insanity that comes with attempting to feed yourself after two decades of life as a touring indie musician. Leo isn't ready to hang up the denim jacket quite yet, but for the love of Christ, go see him. Tonight. Right fucking now. Leo's penchant for writing jittery rock and roll songs is criminally underappreciated. Let's break it down: if you like Thin Lizzy, you will like Ted Leo; if you like Fugazi, you will like Ted Leo; if you like Elvis Costello, you will love Ted Leo. If your musical interests are not covered in any of the aforementioned bands, then never mind, we could never be friends anyway. EAC


MARISA ANDERSON, LARRY YES AND THE TANGLED MESS

(Eagles Lodge, 4904 SE Hawthorne) The Golden Hour, the second solo record from guitarist Marisa Anderson, is a collection of 12 solo improvised compositions that sound like transmissions from the dusty roads of America's past. Some songs rattle and groan with amplifier rust, while others dance nimbly from Anderson's fingerwork, embracing the physicality of country and blues music while inhabiting a more mystical headspace. It's music for the mind and the body, and Anderson's sure, steady hand (which has also done time with the Dolly Ranchers and the Evolutionary Jass Band) goes fearlessly into unknown territory, places that are rich with dirt and ghosts and loss—and also joy. Tonight's show celebrates the release of the record, pressed onto vinyl by Mississippi Records. NED LANNAMANN

A complete listing of this week's shows can be viewed here.


LARRY AND THE RICKETS, THE MEAN JEANS, THERAPISTS

(East End, 203 SE Grand) On Bainbridge Island, just across the Puget Sound from the Seattle's blossoming grunge scene, the Rickets were on their way to becoming one of the Northwest's finest underground punk bands. The trio, who formed in 1990, were the Northwest's own Circle Jerks—snotty, miscreant, speed-addled, don't-give-a-fuck hardcore that liked to party. The band went under the guises of Larry Diarrhea, Peter Phlegm, and Scott Thyroid, and they made their way up and down the West Coast supporting high profile punk acts like Rancid. The Rickets went through a few line-up changes before hanging up their boots in '96, but reformed with the original trio this past December at Seattle's notoriously celebrated punk dive, the Funhouse, in the wake of their Anthology LP release. Portland's own notoriously celebrated punk dive East End will host Larry and the Rickets, who will be supported by poppy booger punks the Mean Jeans, and caustic, self-deprecating revelers Therapists. TRAVIS RITTER


THE CONCRETES, MILLIONYOUNG, SCARS ON 45

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Years before our iTunes playlists were hijacked by the likes of Jens, Lykke, and the Tallest Man, Stockholm's the Concretes held the title as best Swedish pop band in the land. The band resurfaced last year with the precocious WYWH, a sparkling disco-pop recording for the kids who'd rather cross their arms and prop up a wall than actually dance. Credit the Concretes not only for their spirited comeback, but also for pulling off the seemingly impossible swap of vocalists, as singer Victoria Bergsman left the band and was replaced by longtime drummer Lisa Milberg. Just like Genesis! Thankfully WYWH is not their We Can't Dance. Heaven forbid anyone revisit that record again. EAC


FERNANDO, RICHMOND FONTAINE, MASSY FERGUSON

(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) With the exception of the agricultural machinery-named openers (Massy Ferguson), this might as well be a 1997 show at EJ's. Fernando Viciconte and Willy Vlautin of Richmond Fontaine are two of Portland's finest and most enduring songwriters, and just like old times they'll be sharing a stage. Fresh out of retirement, Fernando is making the rounds in support of last year's True Instigator, while the hard-drinking gentlemen of Richmond Fontaine have just finished rolling tape on full-length album number 10. But you won't hear a peep of that record tonight, since the band is treating us to 2002's Winnemucca in its entirety. Let's get dropped off at "Winner's Casino" once more. EAC

A complete listing of this week's shows can be viewed here.