SOUL'D OUT: MOS DEF, HOT 8 BRASS BAND

(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Feeling bummed by both the state of hiphop and the state of society as a whole? Fear not, as tonight, rapper-turned-activist-turned-actor Mos Def brings his socially conscious brand of hiphop to the Roseland, backed by the Hot 8 Brass Band as a part of the Soul'd Out Music Festival. ANDREW CHOI


DEFTONES, DILLINGER ESCAPE PLAN, FUNERAL PARTY

(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) I'm still baffled as to how the Deftones have managed to stay relevant all the way into 2011 while most of their peers have gone the way of the dollar bin—especially considering how the band's formula has hardly budged over the last decade-plus. It's been an interesting few years for the Sacto band. Their bassist Chi Chang continues to lie bedridden after a car accident left him in a coma in 2008. The tragedy led to the band shelving their Eros album and instead recording Diamond Eyes, a record met with an inexplicably glowing reception. What leaves me really scratching my head is the fact that the Deftones—in 20-goddamn-11—are selling out dates all over the country... including one of their two nights at the Crystal Ballroom. As much as I'm tempted to listen to Diamond Eyes to see what the fuss is all about, I think I'm going to instead put on Around the Fur (their best), close my eyes, and pretend it's 19-goddamn-97 again. MARK LORE


RECORD STORE DAY: WHITE HINTERLAND, HOSANNAS, SALLIE FORD AND THE SOUND OUTSIDE, BRUSH PRAIRIE, NURSES, ANCIENT HEAT, ZIA MCCABE

(Everyday Music, 1313 W Burnside) With another year comes another third Saturday in April—the celebrated Record Store Day—and along with it, a slew of releases, both specially curated and otherwise, to be thumbed through and held in your hot little hands. It is recommended you propel your music-loving feet to Everyday Music, to pay homage to one of Portland's sprawling independent record shops; they would like to show their gratitude for another year's worth of your business with a free (!) in-store performance featuring a fantastic local lineup to be enjoyed while you languish over rows and rows of vinyl, tangible as ever, both old and new. Surely Sallie Ford's brazen Americana and DJ sets from White Hinterland and Nurses are enough to discourage mindless clicking through those severed iTunes song samplings for at least a day. Your heightened senses will thank you. RAQUEL NASSER Also, read our Record Store Day article.

A complete listing of this week's shows can be viewed here.


SINÉAD O'COVERS, SWEET FLOWIN' LOVE, LEZ PHAIR

(The Woods, 6637 SE Milwaukie) It's covers night at the Woods: The one-off supergroup SinÉad O'Covers is made up of Kaia Wilson, her Team Dresch bandmate Jody Bleyle, Gossip drummer Hannah Blilie, Rachel Blumberg from Norfolk and Western, guitarist Marisa Anderson, plus a backing string ensemble. They're doing songs exclusively from SinÉad O'Connor's classic 1987 debut The Lion and the Cobra and 1990's monstrously popular I Do Not Want What I Haven't Got—presumably, no tearing of pope photos, as O'Connor legendarily did on Saturday Night Live in 1992. Meanwhile, Sweet Flowin' Love performs Heart covers, and Lez Phair is Erase Errata's Jenny Hoyston in the guise of Liz Phair—presumably running through the still-stunning highlights of Exile in Guyville and hopefully staying far away from Phair's 2003 self-titled debacle or last year's Funstyle. NED LANNAMANN


RICH LANDAR AND SONIC JELLY, DRUNKEN PRAYER

(Biddy McGraw's, 6000 NE Glisan) Rich Landar has played in a ton of bands, including King Black Acid and Jesus Presley, and he's assembled a new record called It's About Time from recordings done at home and in various hotel rooms. With appearances from Tahoe Jackson, Paul Brainard, and other local guests, the record is a pleasant excursion through a variety of roots-flecked musical styles. There's a touch of countrified acid rock underneath the gospel choir in "My City Is Burning," there's a gentle piano ballad in the form of "Quote Unquote," and a moody art piece in the seven-minute "White Curtain." It's all well crafted, and performed with a looseness and bonhomie that's impossible to fake, and if none of the songs stick out as masterpieces, the record shows a successful transition from Landar's role as sideman to that of frontman. NL


TANGO ALPHA TANGO, TIGER HOUSE

(White Eagle, 836 N Russell) The new, self-titled release from Portland band Tango Alpha Tango sits in that uncomfortable place between EP and full-length—it runs seven songs, just under half an hour—but everything else about the record fits perfectly. Starting with the laidback country swoon of "Oh Mama," the quartet then launches into a slow-building motorik guitar riff in "Mona Lisa's Death." Elsewhere, the band continues that expert and surprising balance of folk noir and space rock, even finding room for a glossy pop chorus in "Give of the Summer." There isn't a single wrong move on Tango Alpha Tango; "This City" rears an angry, stoner blues riff in the middle of a tightly knotted funk strut, and as clunky as that sounds, it works brilliantly. On record, Tango Alpha Tango continues to make some confoundingly good work, following up 2008's Rebel Sons of Cowboys with a collection of adventurous and admirable rock and roll. NL

A complete listing of this week's shows can be viewed here.