JARED MEES AND THE GROWN CHILDREN, YOUR RIVAL, WILD ONES (6 pm, Backspace, 115 NW 5th)

JARED MEES AND THE GROWN CHILDREN, DIRTY MITTENS, AND AND AND (9 pm, Someday Lounge, 125 NW 5th)
Read our article on Jared Mees and the Grown Children.



DREW GROW AND THE PASTORS' WIVES, QUASI
(Ella Street Social Club, 714 SW 20th Place) After a nasty car accident in January, Portland songwriter Drew Grow took some needed recovery time. Tonight, Grow and his band the Pastors' Wives make a very welcome return to the Portland stage—playing what is sure to be a packed-to-the-rafters gig in the cozy Ella Street Social Club. What's more, local heavyweights Quasi are opening, so get your ticket now. NED LANNAMANN


X RAY EYEBALLS, GRAVE BABIES, HURRY UP
(East End, 203 SE Grand) Read our article on Grave Babies.


JOE PUG, CELILO, STRAND OF OAKS
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Strand of Oaks—though also known by his God-given name, Timothy Showalter—has remained one of the northeastern states' best-kept secrets for some time now. Stationed in Philadelphia, Showalter has filled many an art space and venue back east to the brim with his barren folk rock (think the stripped honesty and fine china-wielding capabilities of Bruce Springsteen's Nebraska: a lone storyteller with a Telecaster). This run with Chicago troubadour Joe Pug is Showalter's very first tour beyond the Great Divide, and it's a journey that should treat him kindly. Pope Killdragon, Strand of Oaks' second album, is a spectacular collection of songs shaded with relatable sadness and wrought with appearances from religious idols and historical figures, as familiar as if they were past lovers and next-door neighbors. It's highly recommended you head to the Doug Fir early and listen close, for who knows when Strand of Oaks will be back this way again? RAQUEL NASSER


FEMI KUTI AND THE POSITIVE FORCE, DJ SANTO
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) The new album by Femi Kuti, Africa for Africa, sounds primarily driven by political anger. Recorded in Kuti's home country of Nigeria in the crushingly huge city of Lagos, it's the sound of a globetrotter keenly focusing his world-weary eyes on problems at home. There is talk of "Bad Government" in the song of the same name; a plea of food for the hungry and democratic change in "Dem Bobo"; he name-checks Patrice Lumumba, Nelson Mandela, and plenty others in "Make We Remember." Femi is carrying the torch, of course, and although he does not blaze the trails of his famous father Fela so much as follow their established path, his music is brimming with a contemporary urgency. Transposed against the pure, near-rapturous physicality of his Afrobeat music—again, a shadow of his father's, but we'll take it—this show will be a fiery dance party, ignited by a call to activism. NL


THE DEATH SET, WIN WIN, BREAKFAST MOUNTAIN, SERIOUS BUSINESS
(Branx, 320 SE 2nd) Within the new generation of electro-rap party music (Girl Talk, Chromeo), the Death Set bring something unique to the table. The Brooklyn-via-Australia act do so via a montage of electric and digital instrumentation (conjuring former tourmates Japanther) alongside high-energy dance beats (in the style of their mentor Diplo), and some punk rock sung/shouted/spouted vocals as well. The trio has spent half a decade producing their frenetic, genre-bending music, with a current incarnation that includes founding member Johnny Siera with support from Japhet Landis and Daniel Walker. Their latest, Michel Poiccard, is an impressive snapshot of the band at their finest, including a few more indie-tinged numbers (such as "I Love You Beau Velasco," an homage to a former member of the band who has passed away) that will likely cause their dreamy fans to swoon. MARANDA BISH