PORTLAND MUTANT PARTY: WH WALKER, DEFECT DEFECT, GUANTANAMO BAYWATCH, YOUTHBITCH, TENSIONS
(Branx, 320 SE 2nd) Celebrate Mutant Party night number two (Dos Mutantes?) with a raucous gathering of artists culled from the 7-inch series of the same name. Last night’s lineup featured artists from Volume One of the Jonny Cat Records vinyl compilation, and tonight tackles the second edition, with bouncy garage-pop from WH Walker, the jittery hardcore of Defect Defect, and plenty more. All are welcome, even those with the X-gene. EAC


KLEZMOCRACY
(Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 NE Alberta) With Klezmocracy, you pretty much know what you are going to get (more like Kleztatorship, right?). The "Afro-Hebrew" quintet deliver their second full-length, Reach, tonight and it's a robust spattering of Eastern Bloc folk, vintage Harlem jazz, and everything in between (which in this case, is quite literally everything). Opening number "Columbia, the Headwaters" is deliberately paced and mournful, sounding like something Morphine would have written in their most introspective moment, and from there things pick up, with songs like the festive "Hava Netze" and "Mideast Midwest" (which just might be the long-lost instrumental track from Swordfishtrombones) anchoring this impressive recording. EZRA ACE CARAEFF



WILDBIRDS AND PEACEDRUMS, THERAPIES SON
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) On The Snake, Wildbirds and Peacedrums have delivered a bracing set of arty world pop electrified by Mariam Wallentin's bravura Laura Nyro-meets-Patti Smith emoting and husband Andreas Werliin's diverse, exotic percussion. It was filled with quirkiness that didn't grate—a rare feat. The more recent Rivers refines the duo's polyglot global music while encompassing what sound like ancient Latin hymns for that solemn, very old-school beauty, thanks to the 12-person Schola Cantorum Reykjavik Chamber Choir. W&P excel to a much greater extent live than they do on record, so prepare thyself for an engrossing spectacle. DAVE SEGAL


KAY KAY AND HIS WEATHERED UNDERGROUND, YOUR RIVAL
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) The ornate songs of Kay Kay and His Weathered Underground have earned comparisons to '60s baroque pop bands like the Left Banke, but the group's second album—deceptively called Introducing—sounds more like the massive monoliths of pop constructed by Electric Light Orchestra, with both a sunshiny hue of nostalgia and a futuristic, progressive bent. Introducing had a protracted gestation process; producer Tom Pfaeffle passed away in 2009 just as the album's initial recording was completed. The Seattle group then spent the ensuing months in a period of mourning, slowly putting the final touches on an album that serves not so much as an elegy as a renewed celebration of life. The band, a fluctuating lineup that sometimes sees a dozen musicians alongside core Undergrounders Kirk Huffman and Kyle O'Quin, has always put on celebratory shows of dizzying but never nefarious psychedelia, and tonight's Portland release party for Introducing should be no exception. NL


REDWOOD SON, BRAD MACKESON, JORDAN HARRIS, SARAH BILLINGS
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) It seems a little grouchy to criticize a band for releasing too much music, but in the case of Portland folk-rock band Redwood Son, it can’t be helped. Redwood Son’s debut album, The Lion’s Inside, is a double-disc helping of 20 songs, and it’s simply too much. Part of the problem might be that—unlike other double albums like the White Album or London’s Calling—all of the songs are from the pen of a single person, in this case Josh Malm, who’s assembled a great cast of local musicians to assist him on this very lengthy recording. (Kipp Crawford, the Celilo drummer who tragically died in 2009, was in an early lineup of the band.) The Lion’s Inside’s two discs are presumably organized so that the first disc contains a rawer sound while the second has more mainstream material, but to my ears it all sounded like fairly amiable, generic, KINK-ready Americana pop. Maybe this is too harsh—there might very well be a few masterpieces tucked away at the end of disc two. I wouldn’t know. I didn’t make it that far. NL


KORY QUINN AND THE COMRADES, ROB STROUP, NAOMI HOOLEY, DREW NORMAN
(Alberta Street Pub, 1036 NE Alberta) I suppose if one could pinpoint exactly what it is that separates good folk and roots-based music from mediocre schlock, everyone would be getting it right. Obviously, not everyone does—but Portland-by-way-of-Indianapolis singer/songwriter Kory Quinn is one of those whose music not only upholds well-worn traditions but also sounds fresh in the process. It might be a case of believability: Quinn's latest nine-song collection, Waitin' for a Train, carries on the tradition of wandering troubadours and train-hopping drifters, and if that's a romantic notion (it's not entirely fabricated—Quinn recently took a trip across the US by train, although it was funded by Kickstarter, so one presumes he wasn't hopping from boxcar to boxcar), it's one that Quinn imbues with authenticity. In a crowded field of local roots musicians, Quinn stands out as one who's got his bead aimed precisely at the truth. NED LANNAMANN