INTO THE WOODS QUARTERLY: FEELINGS, THE RESERVATIONS, PIGEONS, RADIATION CITY
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) The dedicated artistic staff of Into the Woods made their mark filming fascinating musical performances from local and national musicians, so it's only fitting that they curate a quarterly event that showcases such bands. In addition to special videos from the yucksters in Comedy is OK, this inaugural night is headlined by Feelings, the much-anticipated new outlet for Guidance Counselor's Ian Anderson. EAC


DIRTY MITTENS, BLACK WHALES, ORCA TEAM
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Read our article on Dirty Mittene


JOHN DOE, JILL SOBULE
(Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 NE Alberta) No stranger to sharing the microphone, John Doe recently teamed with tonight's billmate Jill Sobule for A Day at the Pass, a fan-funded collaboration captured to tape during a one-day studio session. It's a loose recording, unburdened by excessive overdubs or studio trickery, and is worth purchase solely for the pair's lovely version of the oft-covered "Never My Love." In addition, Doe's take on Big Star's "I'm in Love With a Girl" is barren and beautiful, while Sobule bafflingly tacks on a new recording of her ubiquitous "I Kissed a Girl" at the end of the album, as if to remind us once more that she experimented with the fairer gender long before Katy Perry said it was cool. EZRA ACE CARAEFF


THE WE SHARED MILK, YOUTH, PAPER BRAIN
(Ella Street Social Club, 714 SW 20th Place) A pair of transplanted Alaskans make up the We Shared Milk, the local band whose latest EP Jesuses sees a physical release at tonight's show. Those Alaskans are Eric Ambrosius, who drums for World's Greatest Ghosts, and Boone Howard, who does sound for fellow Alaskans Portugal. The Man. Zach Carothers and Ryan Neighbors of P.TM also turn up on Jesuses, which contains tumbling '90s guitars, durable melodies, appealingly unpredictable stylistic shifts (the disco lope of penultimate track "Butcher" is unexpected), and a loosely psychedelic vibe (shown to trippiest effect at the end of "I Picked Up the Axe"). Not a single one of the EP's 20 minutes are dull, and the band's even got a couple potential classics up their sleeves, like the speedy pop of "Drag" and the free-and-easy country waltz of "Cookie Jar." NED LANNAMANN


EDDIE VEDDER, GLEN HANSARD
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) Here's the theory: Eddie Vedder and his Pearl Jam pals have achieved a level of credible longevity not for their music, but for by being less embarrassing (and less dead) than the majority of their '90s brethren. Pearl Jam is the band you settle for; thanks to nostalgia, you speak highly of them, but it's not like you are going to actually listen to that one album with the avocado on the cover. Vedder is making the rounds in support of his second solo LP Ukulele Songs—which is exactly what its title suggests—but you won't see him because tonight's show is way sold out, via Ticketmaster. So Eddie and Ticketmaster are cool now? Huh, good to know. EAC


THE WHITE BUFFALO, SPANISH FOR 100
(The Woods, 6637 SE Milwaukie) A bearded, long-haired sonofabitch who looks as if he stumbled into folk music after being booted from a metal band (for beating up the devil), Jake Smith makes the rounds performing under the friendly moniker the White Buffalo. Smith is a man who has witnessed some hard times, and possibly served some as well, but on his forthcoming LP Once Upon a Time in the West he comes across as a weathered hero, a singer with a husky voice and a whiskey slur trying to right some wrongs along the way. He'll drink you under the table, then break a chair over your back, and you'll love every moment of it. EAC