KATE BUSH NIGHT: PARENTHETICAL GIRLS, NEAL MORGAN, ROCKY AND THE PROMS, PRESCRIPTION PILLS & MORE
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) There may be no musician quite as otherworldly as Kate Bush, whose avant-pop songwriting and unmistakable voice make her one of the most incredible (and under-sung) talents out there. Tonight a gallery of local bands pays homage, with covers performed by Parenthetical Girls, Neal Morgan, and plenty others. NED LANNAMANN


QUEENS OF THE STONE AGE, LE BUTCHERETTES
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Read our article on Le Butcherettes.


TY SEGALL, AUDACITY, THE MEAN JEANS, CYCLOTRON
(East End, 203 SE Grand) Read our article on Ty Segall.


AU, BLOUSE
(Dig a Pony, 736 SE Grand) Named in honor of the best John Lennon song to adorn Let it Be (if you think "Across the Universe" is better, we simply cannot be friends), Dig a Pony is the fancy new liquorin' hole that has taken root in the former Niki's Restaurant spot on SE Grand and Morrison. In lieu of cutting a ceremonial ribbon with a gigantic pair of scissors, the Dig a Pony crew is celebrating their grand opening with a free show from a mighty pairing of Portland bands. Au is the visionary project of Luke Wyland and pals—who have kept us in great anticipation for a follow-up to 2008's Verbs ('09's Versions was great, but with re-recorded material, it was a tease)—while Blouse are the fashionable upstarts whose moody, declamatory rock and roll wowed a sweaty PDX Pop Now! crowd this past weekend. EZRA ACE CARAEFF


PAPER/UPPER/CUTS, 1939 ENSEMBLE, YEAH GREAT FINE, DJ RUMTRIGGER

(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) David "Papi" Fimbres has played in exactly one zillion bands—including O Bruxo, Pluvial, Sun Angle, and lots more—but Paper/Upper/Cuts are something else: His one-man, heavily rhythmic project sounds like a global collision of every sound that's ever existed. While the dubbed-out palette is largely electronic, Fimbres drops in flutes, brass, live drums, Spanish freestyling, and lord knows what else over the synthetic backing, with sounds ricocheting off one another, either in a violent tumble or in perfect simpatico—or, often, both. The second Paper/Upper/Cuts album, Illa Killa Yellow Space, is out in a yellow-vinyl run of 300 on the Boomarm Nation label, and it's the kind of record that's so giddily stuffed with ideas that it might be disorienting to listen to, if every note and bang and thud were not infused with Fimbres' inexhaustible, undeniable joy. NED LANNAMANN


LEADERS, PROBLEMS, BUCK WILLIAMS, THE KING IS DEAD, ALABAMA BLACK SNAKE, THE HIGHMEN
(Dante's, 1 SW 3rd) Leaders may be best known for an unfortunate fish stabbing in '09, where singer Donald Fite impaled his girlfriend's pet fish after a fight, telling the authorities, "If she can't have me, then she can't have the fish." It's a shame because Leaders are damn good at what they do, and are well received in other parts of the country (and internationally) for being an unforgiving, hard-hitting rock and roll outfit. Their latest release is the inaugural 7-inch from French imprint Import/Export Records and features "State of Shock," a track that crescendos in a fury of fuzzed and frayed guitar, demented keys, back-breaking drum beat, and Fite's dangerously fierce vocals before fizzling into eight minutes of feedback. MARANDA BISH


RX BANDITS, MAPS AND ATLASES, ZECHS MARQUISE
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE 39th) Once a ska band, always a ska band, right? Okay, well, maybe we can make one exception for Rx Bandits, an ever-evolving Orange County-based four-piece beast of a band. For the past six years, the one-time token ska group on the roster of squeaky-clean lords of the late-'90s pop-punk underground, Drive-Thru Records, have gone through a complete overhaul, keeping their horn section, but easing away from third wave and gravitating toward a more progressive indie-rock-based sound. This is billed as Rx Bandits' "farewell tour," and guitarist Steve Choi has assured that the Bandits will continue in some form, but will cease to tour. Chicago quartet Maps and Atlases are opening the last jaunt, adding a bit of "math-rock cred" to what some might consider "the final skank." KEVIN DIERS