SAGE FRANCIS, THE METERMAIDS, SADISTIK
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Last October, limber-tongued emcee Sage Francis brought a tear to many a backpacker's eye when he announced he was hanging up the mic and quitting touring. Thankfully Francis came to his senses, because the longstanding rhymer has established an inspiring career from his intense live sets. No need to quit the game when you are running it. EAC


JUNIOR BOYS, YOUNG GALAXY
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read our article on Young Galaxy.


BLUE SCHOLARS, BAMBU, THE PHYSICS, SERGE SEVERE
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) I'm not saying Macklemore ate Blue Scholars' lunch, but the fresh-faced Seattle emcee certainly robbed Sabzi and Geologic of some of their momentum. Then again, the Emerald City is big enough for plenty of rhymers—Blue Scholars have been holding it down as beacons of positive hiphop since 2004 and they haven't slowed their roll since. Breaking ties with Rawkus (who released 2007's Bayani) the band used their loyal fanbase to fund this year's Cinemetropolis, which is worth your hard-earned coin solely for "Slick Watts," a Seattle-centric ode to the long lost SuperSonics franchise. I'm not saying it's better than "Bust a Bucket" (or "Can I Get a Headband?"), but it when it comes to hiphop songs that namedrop Dale Ellis, it's absolutely untouchable. EAC


KARL BLAU, OHIOAN, MANXES, RAFFA DE ALASKA Y SUS CAMPAS
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Ryne Warner of Ohioan has been holed up in Anacortes, Washington, at Karl Blau's Unknown Studio, working on what is reported to be Ohioan's last physical album. It's called Balls Deep in Babylon, and after tonight's release show, Warner has vowed that his band will no longer be playing any bars or traditional venues—he moves back to Arizona at the beginning of October and states that he's going to literally wire his band into a school bus. I'm not quite sure what that means, but the incredible Karl Blau collaborating with anyone is reason enough to pique my curiosity, and if Warner's shape-shifting Ohioan ensemble is involved, it's bound to be a stunner. In the studio, "there is a gong as big as a wall, and it vibrates your bowels," Warner reports, suggesting that Balls Deep in Babylon will continue Ohioan's tradition of offbeat, sumptuously transcendent recordings. NL