FRUIT BATS, THE PARSON RED HEADS

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read our article on Fruit Bats.


SHRED FEST: PALO VERDE, LOZEN, STAG BITTEN, TENDER FOREVER, REPORTER, FOREST PARK, REYNOSA, LIKE A VILLAIN, TOMBSTALKER, FUCKING LESBIAN BITCHES, CAT FANCY

(Troubadour Studio, 1020 SE Market) Celebrating women guitarists and musicians, the first-ever Shred Fest collects a bunch of kickass bands to raise funds to start She Shreds, a forthcoming magazine devoted to lady guitarists. With bands like Tender Forever, Reporter, Stag Bitten, Palo Verde, and tons more, this all-day affair won't leave a single stone unshredded. NED LANNAMANN


CELILO, THE MALDIVES, DRUNKEN PRAYER, ED AND THE RED REDS

(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) The story of local band Celilo is one marked by tragedy: A drunken driver killed drummer Kipp Crawford on his bicycle on the way home from a gig two years ago. But if the shadow of Crawford's ghost hangs over the band's backstory, it doesn't permeate Celilo's recent, remarkable Buoy Bell album with unbearable sadness. Rather, the record is a life-affirming collection of songs that flirt with folk, rock, and country, with effervescent jangle and warm humor. Crawford can be heard on Buoy Bell's "Axis," but the rest of the record is filled with the easygoing but sturdy songwriting of frontman Sloan Martin, whose sandpaper voice carries both memory and loss without ever succumbing to regret. The album is a fine tribute to Crawford, but just as importantly, it's the kind of record that will strike a chord in those who don't know its history. NED LANNAMANN


BAYSIDE, SAVES THE DAY, I AM THE AVALANCHE, TRANSIT

(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE 39th) Somewhere in between their essential, self-lacerating emo masterpiece Stay What You Are and the much less macabre follow-up In Reverie, Saves the Day's Chris Conley really mellowed out—he exchanged the snottiness and sneer so pervasive on Stay What You Are and the albums preceding it for a crystal-clear voice and a knack for crafting buoyant, gorgeous melodies. It's a little incongruous, then, that Saves the Day is sharing a bill with "mainstreamo" bands like Bayside and Transit in this day and age, considering their latest release, Daybreak, is pure pop to the core (and "core" isn't a suffix in this instance). But there's still no doubt that they'll whip out "Freakish" at some point in the night, and everyone—not just the birds—is sure to sing along. MORGAN TROPER