FUTURE ISLANDS, ED SCHRADER'S MUSIC BEAT, JASON URICK

(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Read our article on Future Islands.


SHARON JONES & THE DAP-KINGS, MONARQUES

(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) You hear the phrase "they don't make 'em like they used to" all the time, but in the case of Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings, they kinda do. Reviving the '60s-'70s heyday of soul, Jones & Co. eschew modern recording techniques and instrumentation for their original arrangements, making everything new sound old again. MARJORIE SKINNER


WE WERE PROMISED JETPACKS, ROYAL BANGS, BEAR HANDS

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Ambition suits Edinburgh's We Were Promised Jetpacks. Their second album, In the Pit of the Stomach, sees them reaching for the stratosphere with jumbo-sized melodies and completely unrestrained production. In clumsier hands—or, more accurately, in less sincere hands—than those of the Scottish quartet, this would spell disaster, but this group seems to be up to the challenge of building monuments. Drums thump heavily on the downbeats, guitars swirl into thick fogs, and singer Adam Thompson maintains that uniquely Scottish trick of sounding both aggravated and forlorn. Some reviewers seem to have missed this entirely, but We Were Promised Jetpacks are currently making sounds that are fully enveloping in their cloud-swept might. NED LANNAMANN


FRANK FAIRFIELD

(Duff's Garage, 1635 SE 7th) If you were to catch a snippet of Frank Fairfield's well-worn Americana in some dark bar east of the Mississippi, you would surely assume he'd risen from the high times of Bill Monroe and Earl Scruggs. You might expect a YouTube search to yield grainy videos of him perched on a haystack at the Grand Ole Opry, dressed to the nines and pneumatic in his construction of frenetic clawhammer banjo licks. However preserved and Appalachian Fairfield sounds, though, he hails from the urban clutches of Los Angeles and is barely 25 years old; it is by preternaturally channeling the dusky ghosts of American music that Fairfield conjures such timelessness. This spring's Out on the Open West is a truly beautiful collection of traditional ballads, conjuring the bygone worlds of pre-war, country folk bliss, and it's best you don't miss this opportunity to travel back in time and get a good look at the wiring. RAQUEL NASSER