THE WE SHARED MILK, YEAH GREAT FINE, CHARTS

(Beauty Bar, 111 SW Ash) Attention, studio rats: You don't need sterling, crystal-clear production to get your point across. For an example, look to Carole King's muffled, near-indecipherable but hauntingly lovely demo of "The Porpoise Song," which actually sounds like it was recorded underwater. For another example, look to SUH, the brand-new EP from the We Shared Milk, which, according to the band, was "self-recorded in two weeks in a Northeast Portland basement with shitty digital plug-ins and the wrong mics." Its limited production can't confine the excellent tunes and inventive arrangements of which the We Shared Milk hold full command. For yet another example, look to the latest recordings from Charts, now on a split tape from Eggy Records. Laid down on cassette four-track by Eggy's Raf Spielman, Charts' rough 'n' raw garage sing-alongs zip around with lots of electricity, and the lovely layer of tape hiss makes it all sound even better. Both Charts and the We Shared Milk offer up new tunes at tonight's show. NED LANNAMANN


APES TAPES SHOWCASE: ONUINU, ADVENTURES WITH MIGHT, VANIMAL, XDS, PEGASUS DREAM, PALMAS DJS

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Portland has a bizarre preoccupation with novelty and nostalgia; just look at us with our dick-shaped doughnuts, our perversely complicated methods of making coffee, and our home-renovation centers filled to the eaves with antique toilets. Perhaps this is why Apes Tapes—the all-cassette label started by Radiation City's Lizzy Ellison and Cameron Spies—makes perfect sense in the confines of this city. In its one measly year of existence, the imprint has released a laudable amount of local music at an extremely affordable price and all by way of their own grunt work, for the sake of the art. Not to mention that the music they're putting out is generally inventive and plain fun, this well-curated bill being no exception. Additionally, all bands playing this night have songs included on Apes Tapes' rousing and celebratory third compilation, Mixed Ape 3, which you'll be able to purchase at the show. RAQUEL NASSER


THE PERCEPTION OF MOVING TARGETS: GROUPER

(Hollywood Theatre, 4122 NE Sandy) Local filmmaker Weston Currie's short films have included a number of videos for Grouper, so it's fitting that Grouper—the name under which Portland artist Liz Harris releases her musical work—collaborated with Currie on the score of his first feature film, The Perception of Moving Targets. A large part of the score takes Grouper's last release, the two-part A I A, as its launching pad, but tonight Harris will perform the score live for the film's Portland premiere. The Perception of Moving Targets appears to be a collection of striking, sometimes uncomfortable images, with any narrative connective tissue left up to the mind of the beholder. It's the perfect match for Grouper's work, which can initially seem diffident but ultimately captivates and unsettles the listener with ferocious and unforgiving beauty. NL


LUCINDA WILLIAMS, BLAKE MILLS

(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) Lucinda Williams has taken a somewhat unorthodox path to becoming one of the finest voices/storytellers in roots music. Williams didn't truly hit her stride until 1998, with the release of Car Wheels on a Gravel Road. The '00s saw Williams' output increase along with her appeal to both critics and peers, including the likes of Elvis Costello and Tom Petty. It's been a natural progression, one filled with lengthy gaps between albums, and open-diary storytelling that defines some of the best American country songs. Williams recently got married, which has skewed her yarns of lost love. Actually, hearing the new material alongside Williams' older songs might be the most therapeutic thing you do tonight. MARK LORE