CROOKED FINGERS, STRAND OF OAKS, SHELBY EARL

(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Read our article on Strand of Oaks.


SONS OF HUNS, OLD JUNIOR, HOOKER VOMIT

(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) Old Growth is dead—long live Old Growth. Well, perhaps Old Growth is not entirely dead, but with bassist Luke Clements living in LA, the future for one of Portland's best, riffiest trios remains uncertain. What a blessing, then, that guitarist John Magnifico and drummer Ben Muha have found themselves another bass player in the form of Cory Decaire and started a sort-of new band: Old Junior. And what another blessing, then, that Old Junior's music isn't a pale shadow of the glorious guitar sludge that Old Growth expertly wielded. Rather, Old Junior is every equal of its predecessor—perhaps it's even more rocking, more Crazy-Horse-circa-Zuma, more magnificent in its awesome guitar mire. Old Junior release their four-song debut EP tonight, and it's outstanding in all respects, every bit as good as the numerous entries in Old Growth's underrated catalog. If Old Growth is dead, long live Old Junior. NL


THE DEVIL MAKES THREE, BROWN BIRD

(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) The Devil Makes Three have kept their busk-worthy and punky bluegrass alive for nearly a decade—impressive for a style of music that has built-in limitations. But these three kids from Santa Cruz aren't about breaking new ground. For the past nine years they've essentially provided the soundtrack to many a drunken party, where no one is left sitting down. It makes sense that the band just released its second live LP Stomp and Smash, as the Devils' studio albums are simply no match for what they do onstage: Fast music for fast people with neck tattoos and a proclivity for Dapper Dan. MARK LORE


THE SATIN CHAPS, THE SUICIDE NOTES, CÉCILIA UND DIE SAUERKRAUTS

(Eagles Lodge, 4904 SE Hawthorne) If you're looking for Saturday night fun, it's at the SE Hawthorne Eagles Lodge: The Satin Chaps play two sets of groovy go-go, plus the Suicide Notes offer a dose of girl-group sass, and CÉcilia und die Sauerkrauts—German name notwithstanding—play French-language covers of '60s garage classics. AND a dance party 'til the wee hours? It's a happening! NED LANNAMANN


NOAH AND THE WHALE, NIKKI LANE

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Like many British musicians, Noah and the Whale seem to be preoccupied with American roots rock. Otherwise, why would their third album, Last Night on Earth, sound exactly like Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers made it? This isn't a bad thing. Sure, they aren't the subtlest band in the world—their name, for instance, and the fact that the single is called "L.I.F.E.G.O.E.S.O.N." But on this album, Noah and the Whale have traded twee for high production value and self-consciousness for a gospel choir. Its name to the contrary, Last Night on Earth is surprisingly optimistic, featuring road-trip-friendly narratives and mind-sticking hooks. Fortunately, Charlie Fink's deadpan (Springsteenian?) vocals prevent even the happiest songs from sounding forced. REBECCA WILSON


CAVE, LOOSE VALUES, ETERNAL TAPESTRY, DJ WYLD CHYLD

(East End, 203 SE Grand) Few American bands have mastered krautrock's mesmerizing, motorik-groove science as spectacularly as Chicago quartet Cave. The best krautrock disciples know that robust rhythmic repetition and textural vibrancy are key to replicating that magical music's mantric power. On their superb new Drag City album, Neverendless, Cave lock into epic, hypnotic jams whose excitement and intensity burgeon with each passing minute. We can't witness peak-era Neu! and Can playing live anymore, but Cave might be the next best thing. DAVE SEGAL