DINOSAUR JR., SCRATCH ACID, PIERCED ARROWS

(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) Oh man, this is gonna be special: For this super-short West Coast tour, Dinosaur Jr. performs their 1988 classic album Bug in its entirety. And if that were not enough—good heavens, you are greedy—before they play they're going to be interviewed about the album live, on stage, by none other than Henry Rollins. All that plus a Scratch Acid reunion? There isn't a "YES!" big enough for this awesomeness. NED LANNAMANN Also, read our article on Scratch Acid


HOLIDAY SHOWDOWN: PORTLAND CELLO PROJECT, ISRAEL NEBEKER & RYAN DOBROWSKI, EMILY WELLS, THE ALIALUJAH CHOIR

(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) Nobody does holiday cheer like the Portland Cello Project—their aptly named Holiday Showdown features a special VIP section for anyone who shows up in a sufficiently gaudy holiday sweater. Joining Portland's favorite string ensemble for the holiday blowout are the Alialujah Choir and members of Blind Pilot. ALISON HALLETT


BENEFIT FOR JONATHAN TOUBIN: DJ BEYONDADOUBT, DJ PAUL DILLON, CYCLOTRON, DJ A TRAIN, DJ PLUCKY, DJ HWY 7, & MORE

(East End, 203 SE Grand) On the morning of Thursday, December 8, Jonathan Toubin got the worst wakeup call imaginable. While he was sleeping in his room at the Jupiter Hotel, a Radio Cab crashed through the wall and drove all the way into his room, pinning him underneath. The New York DJ was visiting Portland for a couple nights to take part in the fifth anniversary of DJ Beyondadoubt's I've Got a Hole in My Soul dance party. Now, suffering incredibly serious injuries, he's in critical care at OHSU, staying in Portland indefinitely. A PayPal account has been set up for Toubin's aid, and you can help by sending money to ihearttoubin@gmail.com, but additionally East End booker Gabe Lageson and his wife Michele McDonnell—both dear friends of Toubin's—have announced a benefit show in his honor, which will allow Toubin's father to remain here in Portland while his son is recovering in the hospital. Fittingly, DJ Beyondadoubt will be there spinning tracks, as well as plenty of other DJs and slop-rockers Cyclotron, plus a special band formed for the occasion including some members of the Dandy Warhols, and some surprise guests, too. It was a bizarre and terrible accident that's keeping Toubin in Portland; with tonight's benefit, perhaps we can show him, his family, and his fans across the globe that wonderful things can happen here in Portland as well. NL


MARK McGUIRE, THE LUNA MOTH, LOWMEN MARKOS, YARDS

(Kelly's Olympian, 426 SW Washington) Portland is long overdue in welcoming visionary sound dude Mark McGuire as a citizen of our fair Rose City. The guy is head of a new class of guitar heroes, and he's everything Satriani isn't. Blending nostalgic electronics with super-ecstatic, looping guitar music that sounds like Frippertronic records being played at 45 RPM, the resulting ambience is so effervescent it can almost be called pop music. His newest record, Get Lost, is a masterful collection of neo-sound classics that are sure to trigger thoughtful relaxation and memories of childhood fascinations. CHRIS CANTINO


REEL BIG FISH, STREETLIGHT MANIFESTO, LIONIZE, RODEO RUBY LOVE

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Reel Big Fish was initially introduced to me the day after I had reached second base for the first time. My recent exploration of the finer sex had rocketed my head into the upper stratospheres of excitement and wonder, so the carefree up-stroked guitars and brass-fueled melodies of 1996's Turn the Radio Off were the perfect soundtrack for my present state of being. In the subsequent year or two to follow, I saw Reel Big Fish many times, and enjoyed all the other bands that made up the mid-'90s ska/punk swell. So, as I sit here listening to Bathory's Blood Fire Death, I contemplate how my tastes have shifted from light-hearted, skankable anthems of fun to spells of unholy darkness and aggressive speed. However the evolution came to be, I am glad to see that RBF is still around sharing their exuberance with new generations. I just don't want to have anything to do with it. ARIS WALES


HOLCOMBE WALLER, JUSTIN HARRIS & DANNY SEIM, RITCHIE YOUNG, ALINA HARDIN

(Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 NE Alberta) It was recently announced that Portland multidisciplinary artist Holcombe Waller is the recipient of a whopping big grant from United States Artists, a national artists advocacy organization that apparently has some serious cash to throw around. Waller, who initially wasn't entirely certain who nominated him or how the heck he won, is receiving $50,000 for his work in the field of music. This announcement came on the heels of the premiere of his latest performance art piece, Surfacing, which Waller cheerfully described as falling into the "weirdo interdisciplinary" space between music and theater. Tonight Waller is performing a more-or-less straightforward musical concert, and he's enlisted some impressive guests: Menomena's Justin Harris and Danny Seim, Loch Lomond's Ritchie Young, and singer/songwriter Alina Hardin. Considering how emotive and ambitious Waller's music has consistently been—whether it's been within the trappings of a larger performance piece, or simply standing on its own—it's gratifying that the Portlander has been recognized on such a monumental level. Knowing Waller, the grant will undoubtedly result in the creation of more of his intriguing, enlivening musical art. NL


NINJA, KEY OF SOLOMON, CHILD CHILDREN

(Foggy Notion, 3416 N Lombard) While trolling around the St. Johns area one evening, an enthusiastic friend persuaded me to pop into a house show. I was in a pissy mood, not drunk enough, and dreading the idea of a bunch of obligatory clapping. I'd also recently had emergency diarrhea in a Wendy's bathroom and was terrified of a repeat performance among hipsters. However, Portland band Child Children absolutely came to my rescue by being totally awesome. This drums and guitar/voice two-piece is made up of Chad and Kelly Reno, who have a spontaneous instrumental chemistry that likely comes from being brothers. Their music is heavy rock with blues elements thrown in, effects pedals, and a ton of sexy stage presence and vocal charisma. By the end of a Child Children show, even the most jaded will not resist dancing. KATIE SHIMER


ADVENTURES! WITH MIGHT, POCKETKNIFE, DOUBLEPLUSGOOD

(Backspace, 115 NW 5th) Tonight, the dark synth wavers of Adventures! With Might, in addition to playing a set of their vaguely evil-sounding party pop, premiere the video for their excellent track "Real Portland." The handsome black-and-white clip has both the nightmarish quality and the silly sense of fun of a vintage horror flick. Shot on a Canon 7D camera, the video tells the story of a mad scientist who brings a Bride-of-Frankenstein-like character to life. According to the band, "It took about two months, $75, and a lot of will power and gumption to make. It looks pretty good." It does indeed, doing justice to a song that was a highlight of the band's self-titled debut. The "Real Portland" video premieres tonight, and its director Jessica Boudreaux's band Pocketknife performs on the bill as well. NL


TENDER LOVING EMPIRE HOLIDAY PARTY: ONUINU, DJ LIZ B, SEX LIFE DJS, DJ BREAKFAST MOUNTAIN

(Ella Street Social Club, 714 SW 20th Pl) This season, Portland's beloved DIY imprint Tender Loving Empire is throwing a holiday bash that absolutely requires you strap in tight to your dancing shoes and head into the dark night. While the bill consists mostly of DJ sets, at the helm of this show is cerebral local triphop act Onuinu (also known as one Dorian Duvall), and as of late, the songs emerging from the brain of Duvall have been nothing short of phenomenal. Packed with robust synths and perfectly syncopated handclaps, "Ice Palace" is a track in particular that beckons repeat plays until sufficient hypnotism is achieved; no matter how stiff this cold weather has made you, there is no way you can't succumb to this groove. And with whatever spirits it may take to help lubricate those rusty joints of yours—though presumably, the holiday spirit should be enough—it's best you get there. RAQUEL NASSER