VALENTINE'S DAY PARTY: EROTIC CITY
(The Spare Room, 4830 NE 42nd) Hey, all you sexy mofos: The Spare Room is the place to drive your Little Red Corvette for a Valentine's dance fest by Erotic City, Portland's wonderful cover band of the Diminutive Purple One. It's Prince tunes all night, with more sexy dance moves than you can shake a crying dove at. COURTNEY FERGUSON


LANGHORNE SLIM
Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Langhorne Slim just finished work on his next album, The Way We Move, which he laid down with his band the Law at Old Soul Studios in the Catskills, and won't come out until May 22. But you don't need to wait nearly so long to hear some tunes from it, as he's playing a special solo show tonight at Bunk Bar. The wandering troubadour calls Portland home now, but he's never in one place for too long, so it's worth taking advantage of his brief spell in town to catch this special performance—Slim's shows are always filled with his special, no-fucking-around, cutthroat brand of spreading joy that never fails to galvanize an audience. NED LANNAMANN


BLACK PUSSY, JR. WORSHIP, KNOX HARRINGTON
(Ash Street Saloon, 225 SW Ash) Black Pussy—which is a Portland band, not a Too $hort song—is a well-oiled stoner rawk machine. The rhythm section alone can level a city block. The band's debut EP, On Blonde, is gorged with rock sludge and songs that are about as subtle as the band's name (it opens with a number called "Marijuana"). It's one thing to play heavy and get labeled as stoner rock; it's another to make playing stoner rock your mission statement. Live, the members of Black Pussy are a cross between Band of Gypsys and the biker chic of Judas Priest, which is to say these guys (and gal) are trying really hard. All of the elements of a great band are there—give them a few years and Black Pussy could be more than just a silly name. MARK LORE


JON RANSOM, MIKE MIDLO, CAIT OLDS
(Record Room, 8 NE Killingsworth) The package for Jon Ransom's debut CD, On a Lark, is the handsomest thing I've seen in some time, each one of its precious 60 copies coming in its own hand-sewn, silk-screened pouch that's fastened shut by a safety pin. The music inside is just as lovely, as Ransom's acoustic songs float by like clouds effortlessly making their way from horizon to horizon. Ransom cites Glen Hansard of the Frames and the Swell Season as an influence, and his songs are similarly uncluttered, directly emotional affairs, but Ransom is also capable of a modesty and warmth that's not often found in Hansard's melodrama. On a Lark is going to be something to treasure for a long time to come. NL