RABBITS, SONS OF HUNS, TOWERS, TURBO PERFECTO
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Blistering heavy rockers Sons of Huns have a ripping new video to premiere at tonight's show. (Spoilers: Fire! Corpses! Fire! Scary men in cloaks! More fire!) Stick around for the fall-through-the-earth's-crust metal of Rabbits, who never fail to pulverize. NED LANNAMANN


MBRASCATU, LONE MADRONE
(The Secret Society, 116 NE Russell) The first time I listened to Mbrascatu's self-titled debut, it was because I was expecting to hear music that was West-African-by-way-of-Portland. It was the combination of consonants, you see; they misled me. Because from the first notes of the first song, Mbrascatu is unmistakably Americana—acoustic guitar, fiddle, banjo—except that the lyrics, and the song titles, are all Italian. Singer/songwriter Andrea Algieri moved from Calabria, Italy, to Portland, where he joined forces with bassist Michael Doherty, also of Future Historians, and John Sabestinas, formerly of Sick Pony, who plays banjo, ukulele, electric guitar, and lap steel. The combination of vernaculars—old-timey folk and Italian crooner—has created indie folk's very own spaghetti western, with Algieri's baritone vocals playing lead heartthrob. REBECCA WILSON


LES MCCANN, JAVON JACKSON, MEL BROWN, FRANK TRIBBLE, ED BENNETT
(Jimmy Mak's, 221 NW 10th) Boasting a career that spans six decades, jazz/soul/R&B pianist Les McCann's live appearances now amount to witnessing a living legend. Even before his breakthrough 1969 Atlantic Records collaboration with Eddie Harris, Swiss Movement, McCann was laying the groundwork for experiments in combining traditional jazz with the emerging dalliances of funk and soul, culminating in the timeless anti-war composition "Compared to What," and the ballad "With These Hands" from Much Les. Though he hasn't released any new material for about a decade, and though a stroke in the mid-'90s slowed him down considerably, the strength of McCann's back catalog—as well as his noted, old school vigor—is more than enough to sustain his legacy as one of the great jazz artists of our time, and makes this a must-see event. RYAN J. PRADO


MANE OF THE CUR, NASALROD, OLD JUNIOR, HONDURAN
(Kenton Club, 2025 N Kilpatrick) Female-fronted hard rock has a certain intoxicating swagger to it. When the masculine tendencies of axe-wielding are melded with the all-powerful, siren-call qualities of the female voice, a potent amalgamation of human energy results. Local group Mane of the Cur builds on this effect masterfully with the alluring vocals of Sarah Crosley, who layers a tremulous warble of voice on top of churning bass, burrowing drums, and unique synthesizers to create satisfying, sultry meditations. Their online EP released this spring—titled Friday April 13th, 1973—captures the band's spooky, supernatural take on rock, creating an atmosphere where one might imagine classic metal being played at a rundown carnival at some heathen celebration. Their cited influences of "crappy Northwest weather and Midwest melancholy" are present in every tweak of the string and blast of the drum. MARANDA BISH