INCREDIBLE YACHT CONTROL, PIGEONS, CHARTS, SLEEPY VILLAIN
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Read our article on Incredible Yacht Control.


ZZ TOP, NASHVILLE PUSSY
(Edgefield, 2126 SW Halsey, Troutdale) ZZ Top has always been a slave to the production value and pop sensibility of the time. In the '70s, it was beer-drenched, bitchin' Southern rock 'n' roll and livestock on stage. In the '80s, it was over-production and music videos with furry guitars and leggy chicks. The '90s, well... let's skip that period. Thankfully, the recent trend for resurfacing rockers is a return to form. Top's Texicali EP, the band's first release since 2003, has four good, old-fashioned American cruising cuts that could probably make your sideburns grow faster. It's no Fandango!, but it's stacked with swagger and stomp-ability. Also, to display their ever-present savviness, the EP was released digitally only. Even though they're at the end of the alphabet, ZZ Top knows how to, well, stay on top. ARIS WALES


LOVE SONGS FOR LAMPS: CALVIN JOHNSON, BROKEN WATER, THE SHIVAS, THE MEMORIES, WHITE RAINBOW & MORE
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) K Records honcho Calvin Johnson made a cassette compilation for the latest issue of the Believer magazine, and to celebrate he's touring with some handpicked bands. Tonight he stops through town with Broken Water, the Memories, the Shivas, White Rainbow, and more—plus a bevy of local cassette labels will have their tables set up. NED LANNAMANN


THE LOWER 48, OH DARLING, SEAN SPELLMAN
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Who knows when the Lower 48 will exhaust their penchant for geography, but let's hope it carries them through another album at least. Like a good map, the Portland-by-way-of-Minnesota trio brims with possibility, even at their most utilitarian. With only an EP and an album—last fall's Where All Maps End—in their knapsacks, they have reached a maturity, a gravitas, that coexists surprisingly well with their warmth. A lot of this is the product of Sarah Parson, whose singular voice comes from deep within her throat, providing aural texture to cling to, even when the band is at their most mellow. Parson's voice is in direct contrast to that of Jasmine Ash, the ethereal lady who fronts LA-based Oh Darling. Her voice is so sweet that, no joke, a chocolate company used one of her solo songs in an international advertising campaign. Classic rocker Sean Spellman of Quiet Life will open the eccentric lineup. REBECCA WILSON