OLD JUNIOR, OLD GROWTH, SCIENCE OF YABRA, THE CUT 45, SLEEP TALKERS, THE BETWIXTIES, JOHN SUTHERLAND
(Kenton Club, 2025 N Kilpatrick) Read our article on Old Junior and Old Growth.


MARCO BENEVENTO, GRAMMIES
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read our article on Marco Benevento.


HOT WATER MUSIC, LA DISPUTE, THE MENZINGERS
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE CÉsar E. ChÁvez) Gainesville's Hot Water Music are touring the country on their first record in eight years. That record, Exister, shows what happens when punks are still working out some demons but have something to prove as musicians. The group has arguably the best rhythm section in punk rock today, not to mention two soulful, wounded, and hopeful singer/guitar players. The message comes through loud and clear in a Southern punk-rock soul gospel revival, where you would almost expect these shows to be played in a large tent with rows of pews. Exister places Hot Water Music very firmly at the beginning of the third chapter in the story of their band—with the driving anthems of Forever and Counting being chapter one, the Epitaph years as the second, and now the solid rock 'n' roll of Exister to keep the story going. JAY WILLIAMS


MICHAEL HURLEY, DRAGGING AN OX THROUGH WATER, HYENA, PAPER UPPER CUTS
(Record Room, 8 NE Killingsworth) The recent Smithsonian Folkways reissue of Michael Hurley's debut recordings, appropriately dubbed First Songs and first released in 1964, has come at a crossroads of sorts for the folk-roots guru. With a new generation of stripped-down folksters idolizing Hurley's matter-of-fact dissertations on werewolves or his desire not to live in the twilight zone, his legendary lo-fi approach is more popular than ever. Hurley, however, remains somewhat of an underground enigma despite releasing more than 20 albums over six decades, and influencing newer buzzworthy artists like Jessica Pratt and, perhaps more indirectly, C.W. Stoneking. Getting the chance to see Hurley, a resident of Astoria for many years now, inside the intimate confines of Record Room is going to be one of the more special shows this year. RYAN J. PRADO


WAMPIRE, ETERNAL TAPESTRY, THE SHIVAS
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Wampire has grown into one of those distinctive local bands about which you'll probably be saying, "I saw them when." They recently signed with Polyvinyl Records and are now labelmates with fellow Portland-based musicians STRFKR. Meanwhile, Jake Portrait of Unknown Mortal Orchestra produced Wampire's upcoming album, Curiosity, which the band has described as a collaborative songwriting effort between themselves and Portrait. Synthy sounds and organ pitches introduce their advance track, "The Hearse," and promise a swirling, dark, but dance-y vibe for the full-length. Tonight they play with local psychedelic and surf rockers Eternal Tapestry and the Shivas. RACHEL MILBAUER


SUPER DIAMOND, UNDER A BLOOD RED SKY
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) On a hot August night, a friend and I went to the Crystal Ballroom to see Super Diamond, the purveyors of "a high-octane [Neil] Diamond tribute show" and, arguably, the world's preeminent musicians devoted to such a noble cause. Yet even as the realization dawned that we were, perhaps, the youngest people in the crowded room—we are both in our early 30s, practically dead—our hopes remained high: This was Super Diamond, and if anything can improve "Shilo" (unlikely), then that something would surely be a surplus of octane. But we ended up leaving before the ending of what felt like a very long show. The ideal of any cover band experience is to remind the audience how much they like the particular band and/or songs being covered, and while Super Diamond certainly accomplished this, they did so with the sort of tongue-in-cheek showmanship usually witnessed at bar mitzvahs or off-Strip acts in Vegas: This was a show, and one devoted as much to the virility the gentlemen of Super Diamond possessed as to Diamond's effortless neo-classics—the true siren calls that had beckoned us there. "Get out of the way, Super Diamond, and simply transfer the Essence of Neil to us," I remember mumbling, sadly, into an overpriced plastic cup of Terminator Stout. But no one heard at all, not even the beer. ERIK HENRIKSEN


THE WOOD BROTHERS, SETH WALKER
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) Whatever musical voodoo was in the water consumed by the Wood family growing up, it's worked wonders. Chris and Oliver Wood have forged a virtuosic trail of bluesy roots, neo-bluegrass, and plain old rock/soul over four studio albums, one EP, and two live LPs. The second installment of their live series, Live 2: Nail and Tooth, is another solid slice of the group's mastery of expansive soundscapes, made to look effortless via the modest instrumentation of double bass and acoustic guitar. The brothers' pseudo-stony dispositions—not to mention Chris' already sizable influence via the success of the Medeski Martin & Wood collaboration—are a subtle glaze on an otherwise hyper-impressive musical dexterity that you really should experience live. RJP