DJANGO DJANGO, NIGHT MOVES
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) While their name conjures up images of twin gypsy guitars, British band Django Django are almost impossible to categorize. Shapeshifting pop, fractal electronica, garage soul, and wiry funk all have their place in these splendidly complex productions. Not since the Beta Band—whose John Maclean is the brother of Django's David Maclean—has eclecticism sounded so catchy. NED LANNAMANN


AND AND AND, THE WE SHARED MILK, MINDEN, THE ECSTATICS
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Today is the day we repeat things three times—it's And And And Day Day Day! The Portland five-piece (why not And And And And And?) is a ripping good time, with sunny pop that's guaranteed to get your feet bopping around, almost like it's summertime or something. Help 'em kick off their tour tour tour! COURTNEY FERGUSON


GENDERS, STILL CAVES, KIM BAXTER
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) It's hard to pinpoint exactly what makes Genders so great. Sure, they've got a richly textured summertime pop vibe. And yeah, Maggie Morris' vocals are a smooth sheen on top of the band's otherwise ramshackle rock. Then there's the quartet's general deftness through which they articulate their sonic assaults, most markedly on their 2012 self-titled debut EP. Now that attention is off the band's former incarnation as Youth, new focus can be applied to the band's new 7-inch (being released tonight at Mississippi Studios), as well as the band's first-ever tour, up and down the West Coast. Genders are also opening for Built to Spill at this year's Treefort Music Festival, which means the jig is up, people. See them now. RYAN J. PRADO


FUN., FAMILY OF THE YEAR
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) If Fun.'s singer Nate Ruess hasn't killed more A&R careers than filesharing, it's certainly been close. Long before the music business sausage factory desperately churned out glossy Fun. singles in search of a hit—which they found in spades with last year's Some Nights—Ruess was at the helm of the Format, another band beloved (and heavily bankrolled) by the industry, yet never quite appreciated by the wide-eyed masses. Ruess' current success has been assembled like a modern-day music industry ship in a bottle: deliberate, painstaking, and with a generous incubation period that most artists would kill for. It's allowed the NYC-via-Arizona frontman to cultivate his style of bellowing every single lyric like IT'S THE MOST IMPORTANT WORD EVER. How the charismatic Ruess has sidestepped the churn-and-burn nature of modern big-budget recording remains a mystery, but kudos to him, and long may he continue to (over) sing each and every song like a small child in an audition for the role of Simba in The Lion King. EZRA ACE CARAEFF


JAPANTHER, FRENCH HORN REBELLION, THE CRY, DESTROY NATE ALLEN, BRAKEMOUTH, DUMPSTER BURGER
(Mt. Tabor Theater, 4811 SE Hawthorne) Japanther—not to be confused with the also-terrific-but-not-nearly-as-prolific Japandroids, or British post-punk harbingers Japan—have been completely underground and lovin' it since their inception over 10 years ago, despite a few notable brushes with mainstream popularity (their song "Radical Businessman," which sort of sounds like MC5's "Kick Out the Jams" played in reverse and features the indisputably anthemic chorus "1,2,3,4/Fuck the cops," was featured prominently in Grand Theft Auto IV, so that's something). Their insistent self-definition as an "art project" as opposed to something more descriptive is probably part NYC-art-school pretension, but generally the band's too all over the place to fit in a specific category. For every questionable noise jam, there's an effortless twee-pop vignette like "She's the One." Japanther are proof that a complete lack of ambition is occasionally the most creatively liberating thing there is for a band. MORGAN TROPER