THE OBLIVIANS, THE MEAN JEANS, THE PYNNACLES, SEX CRIME
(Dante's, 350 W Burnside) When I interviewed the late Jay Reatard for a story about five years ago, we spent a good chunk of time talking about the Oblivians. It's not hard to hear how the band's sleazy, snot-nosed, iconic garage rock informed Reatard's own songwriting sensibilities, but he credited the fellow Memphians for taking him under their collective wing and introducing him to records that bridged the gap from early influences like the Monkees to more obscure punk rock. The Oblivians were no more at the time, though Eric Oblivian (né Friedl) still ran Goner Records (which happened to release some of Reatard's early recordings). Fast forward to 2013, and the Oblivians have just released Desperation, their first studio album in 16 years. MATT SULLIVAN


SUNDOWN AT ECOTRUST: ONUINU, ADVENTURE GALLEY
(Ecotrust, 721 NW 9th) Sundown, Ecotrust's excellent summer series of free concerts is back! Each night features a different band or two as well as an ecological theme (tonight is "water," with Onuinu and Adventure Galley). Look forward to shows up there each week with acts like the Portland Cello Project and Radiation City, too! MARJORIE SKINNER


KEPI GHOULIE, DOG PARTY, THE BLOODTYPES, PRIMITIVE IDOLS
(Katie O'Brien's, 2809 NE Sandy) If you missed Groovie Ghoulies founding member Kepi Ghoulie last August at SMMR BMMR when he was backed by the Mean Jeans, here is another chance to catch the prolific garage pop-punk staple playing a plugged-in set. He's doing two shows tonight at Katie O's, one early all-ages and a later set for the 21-and-over crowd. Last time I caught Kepi I was blown away by his next-level stage banter. He turned his acoustic set into a storytelling session, while peppering in enough jokes to hold the audience's attention whenever he put the guitar down for a few minutes. His effortless wit and enthusiasm left me feeling more connected to the music than I would have been had he rattled off songs one after another. Weeks after that set ended, any between-song banter I heard at a show felt bland and contrived after witnessing Kepi's mastery. CHIPP TERWILLIGER


MORNING RITUAL, DOUBLEPLUSGOOD, CHARTS, KIFFO, RYMES
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Morning Ritual's The Clear Blue Pearl is a lush and astonishing album, one that's surprisingly easy to listen to. The Clear Blue Pearl only masquerades as an indie pop album; in reality it's a single composition by local jazz keyboardist Ben Darwish. He's joined by William Seiji Marsh on guitar, Russ Kleiner on drums, and, awesomely, the Shook Twins on vocals. It was only a matter of time before a musical mastermind got those ladies off their back porch, took away their fucking banjos, and set their eerie harmonies to really good music. It has finally happened, and it works. The Clear Beautiful Pearl would be a great album anyway, thanks to its innovative song structures, perfect production, and the fact that, for a concept album, it's miraculously egoless. Still, their beautiful voices keep the wonkier jazz bits down to earth, infusing them with warmth and soul. REBECCA WILSON


ALTO!, MILLION BRAZILIANS, FRED MEYER
(Ash Street Saloon, 225 SW Ash) Alto! are the sound of the basement show filtered through the ethnographic present. Their debut self-titled LP is a study in progressive rock and harnessed noise, self-released on guitarist Derek Monypeny's Raheem Records. Within the three-song opus, droning samples and Eastern-scale guitar shredding fuse with bombastic dual drums to channel Kraut idols of the past, with scintillating speed and unwavering commitment to a mnemonic formula of polyrhythms and syncopated melodies. With a proper vinyl release celebrated tonight, Alto!'s jam manifesto sets south to tour the West Coast, spreading their honed blend of psych-prog to the heartland and beyond. WYATT SCHAFFNER