STREET ROOTS BENEFIT SHOW: TODD SNIDER, PETER BUCK, SCOTT MCCAUGHEY, CHRIS FUNK, HOUNDSTOOTH, & MORE
(Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 NE Alberta) Street Roots is trying to raise a bunch of money to go weekly, and hook up its army of friendly newspaper vendors with twice the dough from sales. So here's a great way for you to help them remain a strong voice in city hall for the houseless: a benefit show, jammed with local musical giants like Todd Snider, Peter Buck of R.E.M., Scott McCaughey, and Chris Funk. DENIS C. THERIAULT


DUSU MALI BAND
(The Goodfoot, 2845 SE Stark) Read our article on Dusu Mali Band.


MOUNTAIN SOUNDS, VALISE, GOLDEN RETRIEVER, BILLYGOAT
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Though Mountain Sounds released its first album in March, tonight is the first time the band has been able to play a show here in the hometown of founding member Tim Hoyt. The delay has been a bureaucratic one: The other half of the group, Franc Castillejos, lives in the heart of Guatemala, and visas to visit the US are harder than ever to secure. The wait will be worth it, though, as the band's self-titled debut is a delight of finely honed pop informed by the likes of Ben Folds and Jason Mraz. The juxtaposition between that and the expansive drones of bass clarinet/modular synth duo Golden Retriever should make for a head-spinning evening. ROBERT HAM


NOBUNNY, THE BUGS, NEEDLES AND PIZZA
(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) It's true that Nobunny shows tend to be a bit of a spectacle. That's a given when a punk band is fronted by a man who bounces around in the middle of rowdy, sweat-drenched crowds wearing nothing but a tiny pair of underwear, a leather jacket, and a ragged and stained bunny mask. Let's not let that get in the way of the facts: Justin Champlin, the man behind the Nobunny mask, writes some of the best bubblegum garage-pop tunes around. It takes more than a gimmick to pack a venue and transform a set into a massive party every time you come through town, and that's exactly what Nobunny has the ability to do. Tonight he's playing an early, all-ages show, and judging from turnouts in the past, this could fill up quick. CHIPP TERWILLIGER


JAMES BLAKE, NOSAJ THING
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Moore's Law says that every two years computing power becomes twice as powerful and half as expensive. Thanks largely to technology, music has a similar acceleration. It's cheaper and easier to make new sounds as the internet enables ever-greater global dissemination of style, influence, and collaboration. For a picture of this bursting pace, see James Blake. In 2011 he emerged from London, lumped in as part of an emergent genre called dubstep. Blake's bass-heavy, reductionist compositions were hailed as bleeding edge. In the two years since, his eponymous debut now feels familiar, as his skeletal minimalism has taken prominent hold in other genres. In that short time, dubstep, too, became something altogether different—ubiquitous, drilling maximalism. Blake, meanwhile, seems to be shuffling toward hiphop. On this year's Mercury Prize-winning Overgrown he featured RZA, and he recently gave a beat to the marvelous and ascendant Chance the Rapper. And while Blake may indeed have some lasting power—ever rare in this accelerant era—his thin-voiced, confessional songs of woe appear scrubbed in antibacterial soap. Blake is vastly more interesting as a composer than an entertainer. ANDREW R TONRY


DELTRON 3030
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) Deltron 3030 (rapper Del the Funky Homosapien, producer Dan the Automator, and DJ Kid Koala) burst onto the scene back in 2000 with their self-titled sci-fi fantasia. With paranoid lyrics that referenced everything from Y2K to hijacking mechs, and backed with Automator's grandiose beats, Deltron 3030 was a breath of fresh post-apocalyptic air in underground rap. Thirteen years later finally sees the release of a follow-up, the scattershot but enjoyable Event 2. Del remains a deft rapper, with a conversational, effortless flow that masks his dense rhyme schemes and mad-scientist vocabulary. Automator's production still knocks with cinematic menace, chopping up bombastic strings with Koala's whiz-kid scratches darting among the fray. Good to see them forming like Voltron for one more trip to the future. KYLE FLECK