VILLAGE PEOPLE, ANCIENT HEAT
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) Yes, the Village People—camp tropes from the long-dead days of disco and gas shortages—are still a thing. I'm obliged to mention the band put out a new single this summer. But all anyone really cares about is whether these six old men in wild costumes will still sing "YMCA." The answer is yes. Of course. It's the entire reason they still exist. DENIS C. THERIAULT


MENOMENA, BRAINSTORM, GALLONS
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Stretching back to the days of I Am the Fun Blame Monster, Menomena—originally the trio of Justin Harris, Danny Seim, and Brent Knopf—quickly rose through the ranks to become one of Portland's most intriguing and well-regarded bands. They've steadily earned their keep maintaining that spot ever since. Following Knopf's departure, 2012's Moms was alternately playful and elegiac, continuing to offer inventive and original variations on indie-rock sounds—no easy feat. Now Harris and Seim are augmented by Matt Dabrowiak and Dave Depper, and this particular quartet plays their first Portland show ever (barring this summer's 8-Track Relay event that you almost certainly didn't go to). It may also be their last, at least for a while; Menomena currently has no other dates scheduled, and will either be taking time off or, hopefully, starting to tinker on new material. NED LANNAMANN


WAXAHATCHEE, SWEARIN' (EARLY SHOW)
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison)Twin sisters Katie and Allison Crutchfield broke up their band P.S. Eliot, but now they each have their own incredible new act—in Katie's case, the knife-sharp, world-wise songwriting of Waxahatchee, and in Allison's, the fizzing, punk-minded Swearin'. The two excellent bands are on a tour together, so at tonight's all-ages show, you won't have to choose between 'em. NED LANNAMANN Also see Up & Coming.


SOFT METALS, NATHAN DETROIT, NATURAL MAGIC (LATE SHOW)
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) If you like classic, traditional synth pop, LA-via-Portland's Soft Metals—vocalist/keyboardist Patricia Hall and synthesist/programmer/drum-machine operator Ian Hicks—should hit your sweet spot right in the bull's eye. Hall coos with dulcet placidity over midtempo beats and swirling, expansive synths that make you want to get in romantic entanglements in European cities whose names you mispronounce. Their latest album, the sleekly beautiful Lenses, whisks you away to a glamorous rendezvous or five. DAVE SEGAL


BLITZEN TRAPPER, THE WOOLEN MEN (EARLY SHOW);
BLITZEN TRAPPER, THE PARSON RED HEADS (LATE SHOW)

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read our article on Blitzen Trapper.


BUBBLIN': OM UNIT, TIGERFRESH, BEN TACTIC, LINCOLNUP, PHILIP GRASS
(The Rose, 111 SW Ash) Effortlessly blending jungle, drum and bass, dub, and hiphop to create a distinct sound, UK-based Om Unit (Jim Coles) has been beckoning electronic music enthusiasts to the vortex of where these genres meet for several years, garnering high praise along the way. Coles constructs a fascinating form of bass-heavy, science-fiction-infused sound, squeezing an astonishing amount of intricacy into the sonic space of his compositions while still allowing each one to breathe with a zen-like quality. His latest release, Threads, weaves vocal samples into breaks with a smoky intensity equally befitting a dance floor or headphone commute. CHRISTINA BROUSSARD


NOBLE FIRS, HUSTLE AND DRONE, PONY VILLAGE
(Firkin Tavern, 1937 SE 11th) Saturday nights at Southeast dive Firkin Tavern have quietly become a go-to haunt for free tunes from bands of all stripes and sonic territories. This weekend's bill is no slouch itself, boasting a gratis triple threat that'd draw heads anywhere else in town. Noble Firs are releasing their debut LP, Rockoon, a brisk snapshot of elemental pop weirdness with lots of harmonies and layered guitar interplay. Hints of the sort of technically proficient terrain that Minus the Bear might tackle permeate songs like "Boy in a Man Suit," and show fairly daring abandon that eludes concise descriptors. Hustle and Drone's psych-electro sermons and Pony Village's tightly wound indie-pop round out an eclectic evening at the frickin' Firkin. RYAN J. PRADO


MARISA ANDERSON, PLANKTON WAT, ECSTATIC COSMIC UNION
(Little Axe Records, 5012 NE 28th) The resurgence of John Fahey/American Primitive-style solo guitarists over the last few years has provided fans of the folk/blues idiom with a surfeit of new music to revel in. We are lucky to have two of the best instrumentalists of this ilk living in our fair city, and they both play tonight at Little Axe Records. Marisa Anderson has just returned from a tour in support of her brilliant 2013 LP Mercury, which finds her trading in both reverb-heavy strutting and chilling acoustic-guitar reserve. A similar mood runs through the work of Plankton Wat, the musical moniker of former Eternal Tapestry member Dewey Mahood. His most recent LP, Drifter's Temple, wends in his long interest in psychedelia and the occasional excursion into much noisier territory. ROBERT HAM


TONY FURTADO, RUTH MOODY BAND, DIRTY MARTINI
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) As far as Portland's bluegrass/folk scene is concerned, few can beat out Tony Furtado in career longevity and skills. Furtado won banjo competitions as a child, and it shows in his detailed finger-picking. He sings, plays guitar, and is considered a "multi-genre artist," but is clearly a bluegrass banjo aficionado. Since the start of his career in 1992, Furtado has toured extensively, released 15 albums, and played with Alison Krauss and other folk musicians you probably haven't heard of unless you watch Oregon Art Beat and wear fleece. Though this style of music could easily fit into a granola commercial, there's no denying his clear dedication and talent. ROSE FINN


IAMSU!, SAGE THE GEMINI, CHAMPAGNE JAMES, MIKEY VEGAZ, FLIBOE MOE
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) It's been a big year for both Iamsu! and Sage the Gemini. The two young Bay Area rappers are on the verge. Together they scored a hit with "Gas Pedal," a blunt-smoking, skeletal, slithering strip club anthem. Gemini netted another with the similarly bumping, minimal, more melodic but equally salacious "Red Nose." Iamsu!, meanwhile, released a mixtape of his own and a second in collaboration with Problem, another up-and-coming West Coast G on a hot streak. For both Iamsu! and Sage, major label debuts and more national success apparently loom in 2014—just so long as they can keep the pedal down. Should they need advice, inspiration, or a lesson on work ethic, they need not look far, as the godfather of hyphy, E-40, is just around the block. ANDREW R TONRY