GENDERS, THE WE SHARED MILK, THE GHOST EASE
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Read our article on Genders.


THE DISMEMBERMENT PLAN, TELEKINESIS
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Read our article on the Dismemberment Plan.


URAL THOMAS AND THE PAIN, Y LA BAMBA
(Rontoms, 600 E Burnside) If you haven't seen Portland's original soul man Ural Thomas and his crackin' new backing band the Pain yet, well, what are you waiting for? This is simply one of the best live shows around, a joyous, uplifting dance party of classic R&B and moving soul. Thomas and the Pain perform for free at Rontoms tonight. Get there early. It's gonna be one hell of a party. NED LANNAMANN


THE MEAN JEANS, AUDACITY, ROYAL NOBLE
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) Audacity, a four-piece from Fullerton, California, are exactly what you want from a garage-punk band: They're loud, they sing and play with no small amount of attitude, and they tear through songs with speed and authority (on their latest album, Butter Knife, they knock out 13 songs in a half-hour). The group may even exhibit some signs of maturity—tracks like "Autumn" and "Company Time" are power-pop gems that would make Alex Chilton green with envy—but the blunted expressions on their faces in recent publicity pictures reveal these gents to be as puckish and youthful as their music. ROBERT HAM


TENDER AGE, THE DANDELYONS, AMERICAN CREAM
(Valentine's, 232 SW Ankeny) If you're looking for a warm and cozy escape from the cold, Valentine's has got you covered. Portland quartet Tender Age released a self-titled EP a month back that offers a great sampling of their haunting blend of shoegaze. With three tracks clocking in at nearly 15 minutes, there's plenty of room to be lured into the band's hazy, dream-like world, and with an opening track as hypnotic as "Anything," it should only take a few moments. Light and airy vocals twist around a blissed-out guitar riff, while layers of heavy reverb and steady percussion keep it all from drifting too far off. The Dandelyons take a more traditional rock approach.  On "Sunny," the opening track of their debut album, Flowers 'n' Dirt, they ride a moment of carefree pop that could bring visions of summer into even the most darkened barroom. CHIPP TERWILLIGER


JENNIE WAYNE, EZZA ROSE
(Secret Society, 116 NE Russell) Jennie Wayne is one half of local folk duo John Heart Jackie, and she now has a solo joint of her very own. The Great Remembering is a delicate but sturdily constructed birdcage of lovely, sun-dappled folk songs, with backing from members of Blind Pilot and recorded by Musée Mécanique's Sean Ogilvie. As strings and horns provide a backdrop, Wayne's clear, captivating voice pilots these songs square toward one's heart—and they invariably make their destination, as Wayne's songwriting is clear, simple, and truthful, from the wistful recollection on the title track to the firm declaration of love on "Come on Home." Wayne celebrates the release of the 10-song The Great Remembering tonight. NL


OREGON SYMPHONY, ELINA VÄHÄLÄ
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) For all you ignorant fucktards who wrongly assume orchestras just play old music: Tonight our Oregon Symphony busts out a violin concerto written in 2006 by Finnish composer Magnus Lindberg. With its drastically stripped-down orchestration focused on high-strung pensiveness, Lindberg's 27-minute work is nothing less than a sonic wonder for the ears and an ethereal playground for the soul. Plus, I'm pleased as proverbial punch to report the evening's guest fiddler is none other than Elina Vähälä—sliding, scratching, and plucking her way to stratospheric heights on a 335-year-old Stradivarius. If Vähälä's last few appearances at the Schnitz are any indication, this Nordic gypsy's powerful technique and astounding grace will certainly produce spellbinding results. But hang on to your goddamn Poler hats—there's more! P-town's biggest band opens up this show with the sly, dry wit of Prokofiev's The Love for Three Oranges' surreal orchestral suite and closes it down with Tchaikovsky's flamingly over-the-top Symphony No. 4. What's that? Tonight you'll be texting while listening to some pasty lad in pearl-snap buttons whine through masturbatory lyrics? Lucky for you, the program repeats Sunday and Monday, so you've got exactly zero excuses for missing out on the orchestra's last classical concert of 2013. ANGRY SYMPHONY GUY