BENEFIT FOR HOLLAND ANDREWS: AU, 1939 ENSEMBLE, KYLE MORTON AND SHANNON STEELE
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Local musician Holland Andrews (who performs as Like a Villain) recently had her house robbed of all her instruments, computer, and checkbook. Tonight some incredibly talented friends perform to raise money for Andrews—including AU's first show in more than a year, Kyle Morton and Shannon Rose Steele of Typhoon, and 1939 Ensemble. NED LANNAMANN


SKINNY PUPPY, BAAL
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) English author Neil Gaiman once wrote, "Hell may have all the best composers, but heaven has all the best choreographers." For reasons beyond my understanding, I tend to gravitate more toward evil music, so I completely agree. Despite Gaiman's stance, Canadian electro-industrial pioneers Skinny Puppy walk the line between the two realms. Visually, their most recent endeavor, Weapon, looks as menacing as any black or death metal record. The innards, however, tell a much different story. Track for track, Weapon is a bleak, trance-inducing boogie machine. It's harsh and creepy, but just upbeat enough to inspire gyration. Heaven might end up being slightly jealous of the sweaty mess of black vinyl and tangled fishnets that will certainly crowd the dance floor at this show. ARIS WALES


RIO GRANDS, SMOKEY BRIGHTS
(Rontoms, 600 E Burnside) There are two versions of Rio Grands' debut album. The cassette edition of A-Z contains 26 tracks, one for each letter of the alphabet. Each song bears a girl's name, from "Angel" to "Beverly" to "Xylia" to "Zooey." And each one is a sunny, warm, breezy pop song that evokes piña coladas and white tuxedos. (The abridged digital version of A-Z cherry-picks 12 highlights; sorry, "Ursula," you did not make the cut.) The ambitious recording project of Colin Jenkins is more Wilson brothers than yacht rock, though, with '60s beachside color and plenty of tropical flair; and tonight's record release show is an affordable substitute for a trip down to the islands. NL


CASKET GIRLS, STARGAZER LILIES, DOTT, DREAMEND
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) The original "casket girls," so-called for the coffin-shaped boxes that held their belongings, were recruited from France and sent to the New World to become wives to the settlers of the Louisiana colonies in the 18th century. Their mysterious backgrounds and perceived mysticism have made for centuries of lore. Nearly as enigmatic as their namesakes are Savannah, Georgia's Casket Girls—made up of the Greene sisters, Phaedra and Elsa, along with Ryan Graveface (Black Moth Super Rainbow, Dreamend). The trio crafts off-kilter but irresistible dark pop on their recently released second album, True Love Kills the Fairy Tale. Fueled by a love for '60s girl groups, Graveface convinced the initially reluctant sisters to help him fulfill that vision, and hints of the influence can be found among the glorious bombast of cuts like "Secular Love" and "Same Side." The Casket Girls come to town fresh off an accident that totaled their tour van earlier this month, making your wise decision to buy a ticket almost as important for their future as it is for yours. JEREMY PETERSEN