LAKE STREET DIVE, THE CONGRESS
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) If you're anything like me, you recoil at the sound of a lead singer with a wimpy, flavorless voice. However, a singer that sounds constipated doesn't work, either (see: Creed). Luckily, Lake Street Dive lead singer Rachel Price belts out a rich, gooey resonance that could have fallen from the height of Motown. The band's style fits right in with the recent reemergence of soul and old-school R&B, mixed with elements of blues, pop, and jazz. From the group's tight harmonies, the female upright bassist (a rare treat), and the occasional trumpet part, it's no surprise to learn the band met while studying at the New England Conservatory in Boston. Their latest album, Bad Self Portraits, is a great example of how well they've honed their unpretentious, unapologetic sound. ROSE FINN


NICK WATERHOUSE, FRIENDSHIP CAMP, DJ COOKY PARKER
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) The only way the classic R&B sound of neo-soulman Nick Waterhouse would be more authentic is if you overlaid the noise of crackling vinyl on it. His shimmyin', shakin' dance party will heat up the Doug Fir bunker to no end, so put on your best go-go boots and have a gas. NED LANNAMANN


PDNEXT: MIKE Q, GHOST DUB, DANNY CORN, GRAINTABLE, PLUMBLYNE
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Voguing had its moment in the pop-culture sun more than two decades ago, thanks to Madonna's 1990 hit dedicated to the New York-originated dance. But house music acolytes know that it has never gone out of style. One reason is that producers like Mike Q (AKA Michael Cox) are still cutting incredible tracks that bring added heat to the still thriving vogue/ballroom scene. Head of the label Qween Beat, the New Jersey-based DJ and musician offers up catty, sweaty tracks that are unashamedly forward about their intended audience of sexy gay men and the people that love them. Stay well hydrated on Wednesday; the temperature at Holocene is gonna be boiling. ROBERT HAM