RiFF RAFF, GRANDTHEFT, DEAFMIND
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) "Having your own line of sandals is disrespectful to haters." Read our Q&A with RiFF RAFF.

LIZ VICE, THE BREAKING YARD, VALLEY MAKER
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Local singer Liz Vice certainly spreads the gospel with her warm, impassioned take on Southern soul on her spectacular album There's a Light. It's not just that the vintage R&B trappings are note-perfect; Vice's deeply felt devotion and generosity of spirit make her sermon worth hearing, no matter what your religion. NED LANNAMANN

PURITY RING (DJ SET), PRSN
(Branx, 320 SE 2nd) Canadian electro-pop duo Purity Ring played one of the best sets I saw at 2011's MusicfestNW, a potent mix of twee, hiphop, and bass music that catapulted the Doug Fir's basement into the future for 50 minutes. That was before Corin Roddick and Megan James released their outstanding 2012 album Shrines, before they collaborated with Danny Brown and Jon Hopkins, before their remix of Lady Gaga's "Applause." Today, Purity Ring are a much bigger deal. They headline festivals—Oregon's What the Festival last year, for example—and their name has enough cachet that they can book DJ sets like the one they'll perform tonight. What's in store? Who knows? But if Purity Ring's 2013 session for the online music show Boiler Room is any indication, expect originals smoothly sprinkled in among rap/R&B hits by superstars like Nicki Minaj, Ciara, Future, Angel Haze, Jeremih, and Rihanna. BEN SALMON

GARDENS AND VILLA, PURE BATHING CULTURE
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Hey, kids, remember the '80s? If you don't actually remember the '80s, you probably like Gardens and Villa just fine. The Santa Barbara quintet uses blocky, day-glo synths almost exclusively on their new album, Dunes, accompanying them with the kind of lush and echoey production that's intended to evoke that most Miami Vice of decades. Since there are approximately 78 trillion other bands doing exactly the same thing, it's difficult for G&V to gain any real purchase on the listener's memory. But one track on Dunes manages to do it: the Balearic/New Romantic hangover of "Bullet Train," whose blaring synth fanfare would have gone over great in '84. NED LANNAMANN