ORQUESTRA PACIFICO TROPICAL, 1939 ENSEMBLE, POINT JUNCTURE WA
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Tonight's more than a record-release party for Portland's premier cumbia band, Orquestra Pacifico Tropical, who'll make you shake body parts you didn't even know you had. Opening the show is a rare performance from the great Point Juncture, WA, who haven't played a show in well over a year—which gives tonight's triple bill a "do-not-miss" ranking. NED LANNAMANN Read our article on Orquestra Pacifico Tropical.


THE DELINES, FERNANDO
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Read our article on the Delines.


LA RIVERA, THE HILL DOGS, MOOREA MASA
(The Goodfoot, 2845 SE Stark) While La Rivera is made through the eyes and brainpower of Portlander Joshua Rivera, for the band's first album, Late Bloomer, he's brought on a cast of strong musical characters to beef up his vision. The process began two years ago, when Rivera recorded the album at the infamous Jackpot! with overdubs from musicians like Paul Brainard, Asher Fulero, and Tom Morrison. The culmination of that talent is an album made of easy-listening, ballad-y songs with warm steel guitar and organ, tasteful drums, and big harmonies that back Rivera's strong tenor chops. There are moments when Late Bloomer borders on country, and others on pop, but it maintains a middle ground that makes it nice listening for summer days. Now playing in a four-piece band, Rivera will celebrate and showcase that hard work, joined by organ player David Pulliam and harmonies from Moorea Masa. ROBIN BACIOR


AMBROSE AKINMUSIRE, CHRIS BROWN QUARTET
(Jimmy Mak's, 221 NW 10th) If 2011's When the Heart Emerges Glistening established Ambrose Akinmusire as a rising star in jazz, his follow-up—this year's The Imagined Savior Is Far Easier to Paint—is so bright it seems to illuminate territory we didn't know the Oakland-born trumpeter had in his kingdom. Anchored by Akinmusire's longtime band, the album is a sprawling work that uses its headliner's post-bop background as a starting point for compositional experiments, tonal explorations, tasteful excellence from guest guitarist Charles Altura, and even occasional vocals by Becca Stevens, Theo Bleckmann, and Cold Specks. The result is dusky and nimble, adventurous but beautiful. For all the talent around him, however, it is Akinmusire's trumpet—warm, clear, precise—that steals the show. His playing has always been like candy for the ear, and Imagined Savior gives us a peek at his vast artistic vision. BEN SALMON


YOUNG WIDOWS, WHITE REAPER
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Kentucky's Young Widows have always pulled a lot of influences together, using them to great effect in their dark, noisy sound. And while the trio has taken a few moody and mathy detours, they're at their best when they don't fuck around and just bring the noise. Young Widows do just that on Easy Pain, an album that includes eight gut-punchers, with no fat and no filler. The subject matter is just as brutal as it's always been since members Evan Patterson and Nick Thieneman kicked up noise in their former band, Breather Resist. These two have logged a lot of musical miles together, and they're only getting better. MARK LORE


MARK HOSLER, OFFICE PRODUCTS, FOXDYE
(Lola's Room, 1332 W Burnside) For 25 years, Mark Hosler has been rearranging sounds in odd and wonderful ways as a member of Negativland. That group not only made some of the most weird and hilarious sound collages ever, but also changed the conversation around intellectual property rights in music, and the face of sample culture itself. As a solo artist, Hosler concentrates more on destroying sound than re-arranging it. With a wealth of pedals and samplers, he makes chin-scratching noise that doesn't take itself too seriously and always leaves room for surprises. Opening tonight's show is Portland's own Foxdye, who's gained an international following by making intricately constructed, hyperspeed mash-ups of internet memes. Her live sets can range from gorgeous ambience to a rave gone wrong (right?), making tonight's pairing the most unpredictable electronic show you can go to this week. JOSHUA JAMES AMBERSON


PLANNED PARENTHOOD PINK PARTY: LOVEBOMB GO-GO, DJ CALLISTO, DJ ICARUS
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) No one really needs an excuse for a midweek summer party. But if you do: Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon is throwing its annual Pink Party fundraiser—a fun way to help the organization thrive, not just survive, in a time of national moralism. Look for LoveBomb Go-Go, a space-age marching band! And Pillamina, a giant, walking birth-control pack! Who just loves posing for photos! DENIS C. THERIAULT


RODNEY CROWELL, WILL KIMBROUGH
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) Rodney Crowell did an amazing thing a few years ago: He wrote a book. Sure, lots of musicians write books these days—tell-alls that don't, but give away just enough for a hook and some nice publicity. Chinaberry Sidewalks is a beautiful memoir about Crowell's parents and their complicated love story. It was a long-form example of the pitch-perfect songwriting Crowell's practiced for 40 years. His 2013 album, Old Yellow Moon, was a collection of duets with Emmylou Harris, and for his latest, Tarpaper Sky, Crowell brought most of the players from his breakthrough 1988 album Diamonds and Dirt. They set up in one room and let rip live. Will Kimbrough, whose new(ish) Sideshow Love explores the emotion from all its many angles, opens. RYAN WHITE