FUTURE, RICO LOVE
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) Auto-Tune should be as dead as the Doors by now, but Atlanta rapper Future brought new life to it. His album Honest is a wide-ranging, ambitious record that ties hiphop, rap, R&B, pop, and much more into a soulful, immersive experience—perhaps it's redundant to say Future's the sound of the future, but he might very well be. NED LANNAMANN


CLOUD NOTHINGS, METZ, THE WYTCHES
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) Cloud Nothings' breakout album, 2012's Steve Albini-recorded Attack on Memory, was by no means the future-classic rock record the blogosphere wishfully wanted it to be, but it had moments. Honestly, it could've been whittled down to a flawless EP. Half the record is bloated, faux-Fugazi meandering, while the other half is mercilessly catchy—in particular, "Stay Useless," one of the best power-pop anthems of the last decade. The group's new record, Here and Nowhere Else, lacks a pop gem as indelible as "Stay Useless," although the Paul Westerbergian closer "I'm Not Part of Me" comes close. On the whole, though, it's more focused, more punk, and infinitely more slender than its predecessor. MORGAN TROPER


SHARON VAN ETTEN, JANA HUNTER
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read our article on Sharon Van Etten.


A FEW OF ERIC D. JOHNSON'S FAVORITE THINGS: EDJ, CORRINA REPP, RYANFRANCESCONI, REBECCA GATES, ANDY CABIC, PURE BATHING CULTURE
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Eric D. Johnson, formerly of Fruit Bats, has some damned impeccable taste, so let him curate your evening at A Few of My Favorite Things. The recurring event enlists a local shaker to pick their favorite artists to showcase, and EDJ signed up Corrina Repp and Rebecca Gates, alongside films and DJ sets—all to benefit XRAY.fm. COURTNEY FERGUSON


MUGEN HOSO, SHARKS FROM MARS, THEE FOUR TEENS
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) I've never seen Mugen Hoso in the flesh before, but I have it on good authority that the Japanese blues-punk duo sometimes do backflips on stage. Yeah. Backflips. I have seen a YouTube clip of them performing Mose Allison's (by way of the Who) "Young Man's Blues" and fucking tearing it up. Taking the song's breakneck turns at top speed and skidding through its many stops and starts, Mugen Hoso send approximately one million volts through it, turning Allison's melancholy blues dawdle into a powder keg that no punk can resist. If Mugen Hoso brings even a 10th of that energy to tonight's show, this is going to be the most electrifying show of the week. Local punks Sharks from Mars offer up their new seven-track CD tonight as well, a hot gob of dirty rock that you'll want to smear all over your jeans. NED LANNAMANN


STEELY DAN, BOBBY BROOM
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) Steely Dan are the perfect representation of the love-them-or-hate-them music-taste binary. Either you're on the bandwagon, singing the background part to "Peg" in your velvetiest Michael McDonald croon, or you're out on the street, pelting the chorus with bang snaps. Both sides of the argument have validity. The coke-fueled, jazz-addicted maelstrom that created albums like 1977's Aja and 1980's Gaucho can certainly leave one feeling cold and itchy. Conversely, the main men of the group (and the only mainstays since the group formed in 1972) wrote some crystalline pop tunes ("Rikki Don't Lose That Number" and "Dirty Work" among them) that move well beyond their jazzy trappings and '70s AOR grandiloquence into the realm of pure classics. ROBERT HAM


JOHANNA WARREN, WHALES WAILING, LE PRINTEMPS
(White Eagle, 836 N Russell) A new transplant to the Portland scene, former Brooklyn-based folk singer Johanna Warren fits in nicely in the Northwest. Mixing playful melodies with dark undertones, her music is comparable to the quieter acts on K Records and Kill Rock Stars from the 1990s. Her songs are sweet without being saccharine, ominous without being overly somber, restrained without being too simplistic. Sharing the bill is Portland's Whales Wailing, who in recent years have morphed their twee-folk into what could be described as a joyous variation on alt-country. Mid-tempo jangly guitars combine with lyrics in a celebratory trip into human connection and the natural world. JOSHUA JAMES AMBERSON


FUCK BUTTONS, TOTAL LIFE, BOMBS INTO YOU
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) Fuck Buttons' first album, 2008's Street Horrrsing, was something of a gateway noise record. It took the harsh, scorched hellscapes of Wolf Eyes and Prurient and dressed them in epic sweeps more befitting post-rockers like Mogwai. Instead of sounding punishing, Street Horrrsing often sounded downright pretty—they were a noise band that could appeal to people with a low threshold for weird music. But over the course of two more records, 2009's Tarot Sport and last year's Slow Focus, Fuck Buttons have charted a course that inches closer to the club, with pulsating rhythms bobbing through soundtrack-y electronics. MATTHEW W. SULLIVAN


CASTLE, SONS OF HUNS, BILLIONS AND BILLIONS
(Slabtown, 1033 NW 16th) San Francisco metalheads Castle chisel four decades of heavy rock into their own menacing monolith. Led by bassist/vocalist Liz Blackwell, the three-piece gets epic and fantastical without giving up too much grind. Castle wrote their latest full-length, Under Siege, in their hometown and in LA, and Blackwell described the result: "It's a California record. We drew from the heavy sounds of those places to write electric witch hymns of death and doom." See? You don't have to be from the gloomy climes of Birmingham to sing about the end of the world. MARK LORE