PANTHER, COPY, E*ROCK
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) If this lineup—Panther, Copy, E*Rock—makes you feel nostalgic, congratulations. You've scored another point in the "I'm so Portland..." game. On the other hand, these are some of the acts that built the reputation this city thrives on today, so come party like it's 2004... in a good way. MARJORIE SKINNER


MY LIFE IN BLACK AND WHITE, GET DEAD, THE HOLLOWPOINTS, THE BRASS
(Dante's, 350 W Burnside) Formed in 2005, My Life in Black and White came back from a brief hiatus last year, and it's been a fruitful rebirth: The Portland band just released its fourth album, Columbia, which I'm guessing they named after the river, and not the university or the record label. Alongside the accelerated tempos and shouted harmonies, the group throws in a few acoustic guitars and hoedown beats, but this is a 21st-century punk record through and through, and a very capable one. From opening track "The Last of the Young Guns," through the full-throttle "(Hold Fast) San Francisco," to the album's not exactly cheery closing stretch of "Dead at 21," "Wasted," and "Smile and Say Goodbye," Columbia is melodic and loud and full of good instincts, a flannel punk-rock album that doesn't compromise. NED LANNAMANN


JOHN HIATT, TAJ MAHAL
(Oregon Zoo, 4001 SW Canyon) Fifty years ago, Henry Saint Clair Fredericks left behind the farms of Massachusetts to come west and become the mighty Taj Mahal. In his long career he's collaborated with everyone from electric blues pioneer Howlin' Wolf to transcendent Malian kora player Toumani Diabate, from the Rolling Stones to Etta James. His catalog is equally varied, and extends from the joyously broken jug-band charm of "Cakewalk into Town" to the folk-blues-meets-Caribbean perfection of "Queen Bee." Mahal makes consistently interesting music and is a true character on stage, unlike any other. If you see Taj at the Zoo, you won't just find an artist who's able to demonstrate his importance in American music history—you'll also find an artist who's unafraid to break out a kazoo on stage. JOSHUA JAMES AMBERSON