FERNANDO Y LOS COCHINOS, TRUJILLO, THE KBs
(The Secret Society, 116 NE Russell) Freddy Trujillo's bona fides are unmatched; the local musician has served as bass player for Richmond Fontaine, Fernando, and the Delines—as well as the late, legendary Caguama, the local rock-en-español group fronted by Raul Ugalde, who tragically died in 2010. Trujillo's new album Amexica is the closest thing we'll have to another Caguama record, and it's a diverse, celebratory album that reveals a deep and abiding love of music. Trujillo embraces cumbia, Chicano rock, and Beatles-esque folk and psychedelia across its 40 minutes, paying tribute to Ugalde and Freddy Fender, and examining the topics of immigration and assimilation. It's a remarkable album, deeply rooted in musical traditions but tying familiar genres together in extraordinary ways. Trujillo's record-release set precedes a one-off reunion of Fernando Viciconte's band Los Cochinos, who will revisit Fernando's 1998 album Pacoima for its 15th (more or less) anniversary. NED LANNAMANN


BEAR IN HEAVEN, YOUNG MAGIC
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Bear in Heaven hit dead-on where a lot of other bands tend to miss the mark. Headman Jon Philpot manages to create a sound that embodies a moody, desolate nature, with still enough of a clean beat and clear song structure to give the listener direction. The fusion of psychedelic wash and electronic rhythmic movement has a nearly metallic feeling to it, a sort of wild-summer-in-the-gritty-city feel. After their breakthrough, 2009's Beast Rest Forth Mouth, and 2012's follow-up, I Love You, It's Cool, Bear in Heaven has a new album, Time Is Over One Day Old, and an new drummer in Jason Nazaryadapts. ROBIN BACIOR



THE MATTSON 2, THE SATIN CHAPS, FEN WIK REN
(Alberta Street Pub, 1036 NE Alberta) More than anything, the Mattson 2 demonstrate just what a limiting term "jazz" can be—not by its makers, but by its beholders (including myself). The twin brothers' 2011 album Feeling Hands embraces surf rock, shoegaze, Brazilian polyrhythms, and American instrumental post-rock, with a heavy dose of you-gotta-see-this musicianship. But the Mattsons' fluidity and sense of daring is 100 percent jazz, rooted in a love for improvisation and an innate sense of dynamics. They should be something to see, in the flesh, on a Friday night. NL


IN THE COOKY JAR FIFTH ANNIVERSARY
(Eagles Lodge, 4904 SE Hawthorne) It's hard to care how old you are when you're having this much fun, but look who's passed the five-year mark: DJ Cooky Parker's In the Cooky Jar is celebrating the milestone with a night of dancing to "the greatest records ever made." Fair enough. MARJORIE SKINNER


BEACON SOUND (RE)OPENING: PETER BRODERICK, GABRIEL SALOMAN, GORDON ASHWORTH
(Beacon Sound, 3636B N Mississippi) Portland record emporium Beacon Sound has relocated to N Mississippi, leaving its original home at Prescott Village around the same time as its neighbors similarly find new digs (Revival Drum Shop) or say farewell (Tiga). To celebrate the new store, Beacon Sound is hosting a two-night "(re)opening" party featuring some the best local experimental musicians in the city. The first night serves as a release show for the joint album by Peter Broderick (Efterklang) and Gabriel Saloman (Yellow Swans), released on Beacon Sound's vinyl imprint. It's an intriguing collaboration, with both musicians stretching out and testing their limits over extended instrumentals. The affinity for beauty and calm in much of Broderick's work juts up against Saloman's discordant tendencies—or, at least, I can only surmise that is the case. The nature of the collaboration is entire, as each artist's individual contributions seamlessly become part of the whole. NL