MUTUAL BENEFIT, JULIE BYRNE, EZZA ROSE
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) A traveling salesperson who's lived all over the country, Seattle-based singer/songwriter Julie Byrne lets her warm, hushed folk ballads traverse an equally wide variety of landscapes. Her songs travel from New York City to Mexico City, stopping to linger in vegetable gardens, black walnut groves, and natural history museums. Her debut studio album, A Room with Walls and Windows (released earlier this year on Orindal Records) is a traveler's journal filled with notes that try to capture a small piece of each new place before moving on, landing somewhere between heart-heavy and wild discovery. After touring the UK, Europe, and the US multiple times, Byrne's back in the Northwest. She'll open the night in support of Brooklyn/Boston band Mutual Benefit, an ever-evolving institution of playful, well-crafted chamber-pop. JOSHUA JAMES AMBERSON


LUNAR LIFTOFF: BOTTOM SHELF BAND, MIGHTY MISC, RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, DJ WEATHER
(Mississippi Pizza Pub, 3552 N Mississippi) Portland native Elan Eichler, AKA emcee Mighty Misc, has triumphantly returned home for good after a brief stint in Michigan. Tonight he is joined by his bandmates in the musically adventurous Bottom Shelf Band, a quintet that playfully blends hiphop with rock, jazz, and funk. Their most recent material finds the group stretching genre experiments even further with a country-style song with Misc exclaiming, "Backyard BBQ with all the brew/I don't drink Miller, I want Deschutes." Research and Development, the stone-y, jazz-inspired hiphop duo of Dusty Fox and Rufus Smalltownz, will also be in the building. The evening is a fundraiser for the Morpheus Youth Project, a youth advocacy group that brings music and arts education to young people currently incarcerated in Oregon, bringing positive creative outlets to their lives. RYAN FEIGH


NW LOOPFEST
(Analog Café, 720 SE Hawthorne) Loop Stations and loop pedals—those little devices that record a musical phrase and repeat it back ad infinitum—are becoming the standard. Not only for solo musicians aiming to replicate fully formed compositions without the help of a backing band, but also for experimental artists to let tones and noises either create a mantra-like experience or challenge the patience of anyone within earshot. Jazz artist Noah Peterson appreciates both sides of that spectrum, which is why he created the NW LoopFest, an all-day celebration of the technology. He's booked an impressive array of looping acolytes, including fusion folk-rocker Rejyna, Mexican ambient jazz-pop artist Cian, the spacey guitar psych of Medford's Ted Killian, and great locals like Consumer, Amenta Abioto, and Noise Agency. ROBERT HAM


PRONG, AMERICAN ROULETTE, BLEEDING COWBOY, ULTRA GOAT, IDLETAP
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) There was a brief period in the summer of 1994 when I couldn't wait for the video for Prong's "Snap Your Fingers, Snap Your Neck" to come on MTV. It still remains one of the best '90s metal songs—definitely a product of its time—and I'm sure it influenced some pretty awful bands. But Prong were putting out records before that (including some that leaned more toward hardcore), and they've released quite a few since that have built on their technical thrash riffing. One thing the band has always been able to do is meld their sound with what's happening at the time. But it always sounds like Prong. And that's always a good thing. MARK LORE