TOTAL RECALL “Why yes, I am interested in the possibility of serving as Hillary’s vice president.”

SCIENCE-FICTION MOVIES are often doomed to be forgotten—and given that most of them are cheap, half-assed cash grabs, that’s probably for the best. But when sci-fi is good, no other genre can match it—as evidenced by the lineup of enduring classics at OMSI’s Sci-Fi Film Festival.

OMSI’s fest boasts plenty of fun sci-fi adventures—John Carpenter’s They Live, Paul Verhoeven’s RoboCop and Total Recall, the 1956 version of Invasion of the Body Snatchers, J.J. Abrams’ Super 8—alongside a couple that haven’t aged as well, like David Lynch’s yawn-inducing Dune and that ’70s show that is Logan’s Run. But your best bets are the films that will shine on OMSI’s massive, 61-foot-by-40-foot screen—especially given that this year, OMSI’s picks are all screening from digital DCP files, which should make the films look and sound phenomenal.

You can’t miss with the balls-out action of George Miller’s Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior, or with rain-slicked, neon-burned streets of Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner—The Final Cut. Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange should be a horrorshow on OMSI’s screen, as is the case with the surreal classic Fantastic Planet, Christopher Nolan’s Inception, and Pixar’s Wall-E (Intel Senior Technologist Dave Shinsel and his robot pal Loki will be introducing Wall-E—somewhat understandably, they will not be doing the same for The Terminator). And don’t forget Spielberg’s E.T., which remains one of the prettiest movies in his oeuvre—and also one that features that creepy alien fuck getting drunk.

But if you don’t mind skipping around the city a bit, take advantage of a fortuitous coincidence: Hit OMSI’s screening of Ridley Scott’s Alien on Thursday, July 14, and then, a day or two later, visit the Hollywood Theatre for their 70mm Extravaganza series, which features James Cameron’s Aliens on 70mm. It’ll be a makeshift double feature—one that’ll be scary and cool and bloody, sure, but also one that’ll remind you how lucky we are to live in Portland, where cinephiles are treated to experiences like these.