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It's holiday time, which means the invites to the season's best parties have started to arrive. I asked some of my favorite fashion people their advice on how to stand out in crowd.


Lavenda Memory [Model, Actress, Photographer]

Plan at least one perfect holiday outfit and make it count. Save it up for the biggest party you'll be attending, and then give yourself a break after that. You can still stand out without recycling the same sequined bust-a-move dress to every event this season.

Since everyone else will be amping up their sparkle game, I suggest going an alternative route. Try other textures, like a shaggy fur vest or a crushed velvet dress, and then accessorize with the teensiest bit of sequins or glitter on your nails or platform booties. You'll look chic and stand out with subtle elegance.


Abibat Durosimi [Hair & Makeup Artist, Model]

Ladies! Here are some tips and tricks for the perfect holiday makeup look: To get more pop to the eyes, use glitter liners or frost colors on the lids. Use shades like blue or gray. Lips, go for a glossy nude or matted red, fuchsia, or purple.

For hair: Keep it simple! Messy low buns or soft beachy waves with small braids tied up to the sides.


Ty McBride [Creative Director - Solestruck.com]

When I go to a holiday party—I ALWAYS take a date, but not just any date. I take someone who is at least 10x hotter than I am. I want this person to cause discomfort, disdain, and lustful eyes from everyone in attendance. It's not what you think—it’s not to balloon my ego, or build me into something I'm not. Oh no, quite the contrary. I find it so much easier to get party makeouts when people are feeling inferior, crushed, and devastated. After my date makes a few circles around the room, we meet up and I let him know who my crush is—then I go in for the kill. Pass the cocktail wienies!

In terms of style, I try to dress for the event, while also keeping my personal style mantra in mind. I love denim and I find that it can be worn to any type of event—but it does depend how you style it! I bought a denim bow tie this year and covered it in bleach spots! I love it with all black! When getting dressed for a holiday party where I know there will be A-listers or potential crushes, I always remember a quote my wisest friend told me once: "Is your look giving fashion director, or fashion director's assistant?" Wiser words have never been spoken, girl, never.


Crispin Argento [Owner of Pino]

I am not sure who said this, but I love this quote as it relates to holiday parties, but generally to life, “Dress for the night you want to have.”

I have been invited to one too many ugly sweater parties this holiday season. Yes, I know Portland's cynicism and sarcasm are part of its charm, but Halloween has come and gone, and frankly "ugly sweater" is not memorable—it's played out, and despite garnering a few laughs upon one's arrival, ugly sweaters are truly unoriginal and not festive. Instead, dress up, look sharp, stand out.

For the gents:
Keep the un-tucked flannel at home and save it for the "next" time you go logging. Instead, wear a sports coat and go with a winter fabric and texture, such as nubby wool (herringbone or tweed) or jewel toned velvet (blue, green, burgundy)—and wear a tie, it completes the look. If you are a true badass, wear a tuxedo and black bow tie. After all, it is the Year of the Tuxedo—just watch how you will command respect, feel good, and stand out. If you must, wear a holiday sweater, but you're an adult and a gentleman, so make it classy.

For the ladies:
A cocktail dress is always a perfect, yet simple, option. Think more Audrey Hepburn and less Lady Gaga! Leave the jeans, yoga pants, and Uggs at home. I know it's cold, but that is what fur (real or fake) is for. Think solids with texture, blacks, blues, and burgundy. If you want to stand out a bit more go with metallic. And to quote Tom Ford, “There is no more dramatic accessory than the perfect lip. It is the focus of the face and it has the power to define a woman’s whole look."