ACID MOTHERS TEMPLE Fri 3/18 Mississippi Studios

WEDNESDAY 3/16

LIKE A RIVER: A CELEBRATION OF THE LIFE AND MUSIC OF JIMMY BOYER
(Kennedy School, 5736 NE 33rd) See My, What a Busy Week!

THE WONDER YEARS, LETLIVE, MICROWAVE, TINY MOVING PARTS
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) Tiny Moving Parts is a punk potpourri that's indivisible by the sum of its parts. On "Happy Birthday," the new single off the group's forthcoming record, Celebrate, they gracefully synthesize math rock with classic emo and budget-bin pop-punk and still manage to create something completely unique. Singer and guitarist Dylan Mattheisen—who recently received some attention in the punk scene for his guest appearance on the new Say Anything record, I Don't Think It Is—is one of the best guitarists currently working within the "twinkle-core" paradigm. Even the group's semi-questionable qualities, like their sappy, hyper-sentimental lyrics, are tempered by a genuine inventiveness that so many of their peers plainly lack. MORGAN TROPER

  • Dreamboat
    Wed 3/16 Holocene
  • Jonathan Sielaff

DREAMBOAT, WL, HUSH ARBORS
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Four years ago, when drone-folk artist Ilyas Ahmed and the modular synth/bass clarinet duo Golden Retriever played live together for the first time as Dreamboat, their performance was nothing short of revelatory. The melding of 12-string acoustic guitar, wowing keyboard melodies, and deep woodwind bleats felt incredibly natural, as if these three had been concocting these songs for years rather than just a few short weeks. Their sporadic appearances since then have been equally inspiring, incrementally preparing us for this month's release of their self-titled debut album. Tonight's show celebrates the release of that mystical-sounding LP on beloved indie label MIE Music. ROBERT HAM

THURSDAY 3/17

CANDACE, CAT HOCH, DRAEMHOUSE, TALKATIVE
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) Read our story on Candace, and see My, What a Busy Week!

GEOFF TATE'S OPERATION: MINDCRIME, BLACK POWDER COUNTY, LAYTEM
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) My favorite movie of all time is an obscure short film titled GT EPK. You can see this spectacular work on YouTube, and you absolutely should. The "GT" in the title stands for Geoff Tate; he's the former singer of a band called Queensrÿche, a Seattle-area metal band whose 1983 debut EP is pretty great, but who are better known for 1988's muddled concept album Operation: Mindcrime and 1990's gloppy ballad "Silent Lucidity." And the "EPK" is presumably "electronic press kit"—the short video, if I had to guess, looks like Tate's audition reel for a reality show. Despite the brief six-minute runtime (two and a half of which are slow-crawling text of Tate's numerous accomplishments), it provides a thoroughly illuminating glimpse into the man himself. Bedecked in an array of revealing tank tops and badass sunglasses, our bald-domed hero tells us he's a "singer," a "songwriter," a "traveler," and an "experience junkie" whose "passion for living borders on extreme." We watch him ride his motorcycle; we see him perform onstage with Queensrÿche; we bear witness to Tate's undeniable badassery. Also, he has his own brand of wine—it's called Insania, which, I'm pretty sure, is the Latin word for "insane." Tate's not in Queensrÿche anymore, but he'll be playing their songs tonight. In the meantime, GT EPK is a piece of cinema for the ages, a character study of warmth, depth, and humor. Please watch it immediately. NED LANNAMANN

FRINGE CLASS, LOVE COP, SMALL SKIES
(Valentines, 232 SW Ankeny) Exhibiting '80s excess, '90s Ace of Base pop, and the modern influences of Portland bands like Pure Bathing Culture, Fringe Class is dance-ready with sophisticated flair from frontwoman Madeline Goldstein's on-point vocals. With two EPs under their belt and a full-length on the way, the band's high-energy show has made them a favorite of the local dance set. Tonight they'll kick off their West Coast tour at Valentines, with a well-balanced lineup of synth-pop bands including the dark-wave of Love Cop and shoegaze-heavy Small Skies. JENI WREN STOTTRUP

FRIDAY 3/18

FARTBARF, KULULULU, THE TOADS
(Analog Cafe, 720 SE Hawthorne) See My, What a Busy Week!

ACID MOTHERS TEMPLE, ORPHAN GOGGLES, ADVENTUROUS SLEEPING
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) The members of Acid Mothers Temple & the Melting Paraiso UFO do not consider themselves a band, but rather a "soul collective" of cosmic musicians. Aptly put, because these Japanese wanderers (led by guitarist Kawabata Makoto) have been casting their sonic spells for almost two decades now, under many side incarnations (Acid Guru Temple, Acid Mother SWR, etc.) and on various labels, including their own. The group's mind-bending live sets and ever-expansive catalog of LPs adhere to a time-tested ethos: simple, churning motifs that slowly build into swirling, orgasmic tempests of electronic noise and hypercolor effects. This keenness for experimental artistry dipped in heavy rock echoes the sounds of '70s Hawkwind, early Kraftwerk, and the epic mindscapes of native forefathers Flower Travellin' Band. Mystical, inventive, and stimulating, Acid Mothers Temple's legendary performances are the epitome of psychedelic rock experiences. CHRIS SUTTON Also see My, What a Busy Week!

2 DAY AT S1: EILEEN ISAGON SKYERS, EMS, CAMERON SHAFII, GORDON ASHWORTH, JEFF WITSCHER, MA CERISE
(S1, 4148 NE Hancock) Since its inception, S1 has proven to be one of the most reliable sources for experimental sound and art. This weekend further cements the art space's reputation, as it welcomes a wealth of musical talent from around the world for a two-day celebration of electronic pop, drone, noise, and even a bit of performance art. While the full event is worthy of your attention, the can't-miss acts include Stockholm electronic artist CoH, whose scratchy, skittering instrumentals sound like decommissioned robots attempting to communicate; the unbound, computer-based explosions of Cameron Shafii; local hero Gordon Ashworth's emotion-rich compositions that blend American Primitive folk and dark waves of sound; the creepy sonic sculptures of Portlander Bob Desaulniers; and the fractured house beats of Brandon Nickell. RH

THIS WILL DESTROY YOU, VINYL WILLIAMS
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Post-rock bands live and die by their command of dynamics. Building from a whisper to triumphant crescendo sounds pretty easy until you try it, which is why This Will Destroy You's music comes with a high degree of difficulty. The Texas quartet stretches the dynamic range of post-rock from both sides—their quiet moments are quieter than most, and their loud moments are louder than most. For evidence, just look to "New Topia," the opening track off TWDY's excellent 2014 release, Another Language. The first half is a gentle sigh of blurry drones and twinkling guitars that wouldn't sound out of place coming from Portland-based ambient hero Eluvium. At about the three-minute mark, "New Topia" shifts into a dense wall of industrial noise-fuzz as an elegant melody wails in the background. This isn't your typical quiet-loud-quiet post-rock. This Will Destroy You explores the distance between beauty and brutality. BEN SALMON

SATURDAY 3/19

THE BODY, TAURUS, MUSCLE & MARROW
(High Water Mark, 6800 NE MLK) Read our story on the Body.

RADIATION CITY, MOON BY YOU
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Read our story on Radiation City.

MAGMA, HELEN MONEY
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) See My, What a Busy Week!

50: A POSSIBLE HISTORY OF DANCE MUSIC, 1966-2016
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See My, What a Busy Week!

2 DAY AT S1: BOB DESAULNIERS, MX FRACTAL, KEYON GASKIN, CAT MUMMIES AT THE LOUVRE, BRANDON NICKELL, COH
(S1, 4148 NE Hancock) See Friday's preview.

I PUT A SPELL ON YOU: A TRIBUTE TO NINA SIMONE: LARHONDA STEELE, ADRIAN MARTIN SEXTET
(Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 NE Alberta) Nina Simone's legacy is undeniable. The tragic, lauded artist and civil rights activist was one of the greats of her era, a classical pianist who began to sing when her early gigs required it. Her emotive voice was an agent of change, and her career is the focus of LaRhonda Steele and the Adrian Martin Sextet's retrospective. Steele is an appropriate and powerful conduit for the late artist, and she'll be playing songs from Simone's early years. Known for her warm, bluesy alto and dynamic stage presence, Steele has wowed audiences as one of the most prominent blues vocalists of the Northwest for decades, and like Simone, she's not immune to the trials of life, having recently recovered from a battle with breast cancer. Paired with Martin's classical-meets-jazz sextet, the power of Simone's legacy is bound to shine in glorious light. JWS

THE PRIDS, HELVETIA, HOLLOW SIDEWALKS
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Portland four-piece Hollow Sidewalks' rollicking, psych-punk debut, Ain't No Way, is a mirthful tribute to good ol' rock 'n' roll, with punchy power chord-driven tracks accented by catchy, repetitious dueling guitar riffs. While this formula can teeter on the brink of dad-rock, Hollow Sidewalks carries a fresh, powerful, and lively energy. The album's standouts are subtler tracks like "The New Theme" and "Somebody Else's Religion." Where classic rock revivalists might meander on cheesy, sentimental ballads, Hollow Sidewalks' tenderest moments still have the potential to bite. CAMERON CROWELL

BLACK TUSK, HOLY GRAIL, NORSKA, MAKING FUCK
(Panic Room, 3100 NE Sandy) These heavy bands are touring the country together, but they don't have much in common. Black Tusk's music is a gnarled amalgam of sludge, thrash, and death metal, following in the swampy tradition of their hometown of Savannah, Georgia's celebrated scene. The band's new album, Pillars of Ash, is their first since bassist Jonathan Athon died after a motorcycle accident in late 2014—it's a thunderous tribute to a fallen brother. Holy Grail, on the other hand, eschews the rough edges of modern metal in favor of the genre's more traditional sounds: chugging riffs, twin-guitar shredding, and skyscraping vocals from the band's arena-ready singer, James Paul Luna. Holy Grail's new album, Times of Pride and Peril, is one of the catchiest heavy albums of 2016—a bracing blast of clean lines, unabashed grandeur, and massive melodies. BS

SUNDAY 3/20

SLAYER, TESTAMENT, CARCASS
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Read our story on Slayer.

XRAY.FM'S SECOND BIRTHDAY PARTY: MIC CAPES, SUMMER CANNIBALS, THE GHOST EASE
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) XRAY.fm is two! To celebrate their toddlerhood, the local station is throwing a big party at Mississippi Studios hosted by comedians Bri Pruett and Curtis Cook, featuring performances by three fantastic Portland acts. Rapper Mic Capes, one third of the Resistance, is gearing up to release his long-awaited sophomore album, Concrete Dreams. So far he's teased us with six singles, including standout "Razor Tongue," a haunting track where Capes raps about systemic inequality and dead ends in St. Johns. Summer Cannibals is also getting ready to hit us with some new material: The punk trio recently premiered the lead single, "Go Home," off their third full-length, Full of It, due in late May on Kill Rock Stars. It sounds like the musical equivalent of an epic rage quit—flipping tables, stomping on Fabergé eggs, pouring milk on everything—all while lead singer Jessica Boudreaux rails, "I'm not the one/You can call if you want." Last year the Ghost Ease released their second album, RAW, 10 tracks of celestial punk that haphazardly follow Jem Marie's lilting vocals though mysterious realms of rock 'n' roll. Don't miss XRAY.fm's birthday showcase of some of Portland's best music. CIARA DOLAN Also see My, What a Busy Week!

MONDAY 3/21

ROB CROW'S GLOOMY PLACE
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) Early in 2015, Rob Crow announced his resignation from music, after many years as the hyper-prolific force behind Pinback and lesser-known projects like Optiganally Yours, Heavy Vegetable, and Thingy. "My kids are growing and my downstairs studio would probably be put to better use as a bedroom," he wrote. Despite Crow's presumed exit, it's hard to imagine the man not making music. Sure enough, he's back with a new band, Rob Crow's Gloomy Place, and a new record, You're Doomed. Be Nice. It is wonderful, and here's a shocker: It sounds like music made by Rob Crow—addictively effervescent guitar lines and airy melodies as far as the eye can see. Tonight, catch Crow at the Hawthorne, and maybe buy a T-shirt. Keep him in the game. We need him. BS

TUESDAY 3/22

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN & THE E STREET BAND
(Moda Center, 1 N Center Ct) See My, What a Busy Week! and All-Ages Action!

AND AND AND, COUCHES, PAPER/UPPER/CUTS
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) And And And drummer Bim Ditson might be turning heads on the Portland mayoral campaign trail with his distinctive leather jacket and mohawk, but his stance on the city's affordable housing crisis and dedication to the cause shouldn't surprise anyone familiar with his band. The DIY indie-rock trailblazers hit the ground running in 2009 and show no signs of letting up. The five-piece recently contributed a track to Joel Magid's excellent Mt. Portland compilation, "Tragedy," which finds the band twisting their way through a stirring and charged roller coaster of tense and wrought emotions. Tonight, they play the Treefort Music Festival kickoff show alongside San Francisco slacker rock outfit Couches. The show doubles as a homecoming for another Portland drummer and community linchpin, Papi Fimbres, who'll get the evening started with a set from his electronic-tinged, percussion and flute-driven solo project, Paper/Upper/Cuts. CHIPP TERWILLIGER

SMASHING PUMPKINS, LIZ PHAIR
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) Mention the name Smashing Pumpkins, and I am immediately brought back to glory days of cloves, broken cassettes, and striped undershirts. I saw them play a few years ago and half-expected a burned-out version of a once vital leviathan. What proceeded was an interstellar tour de force in which Billy Corgan was either melting my face with molten guitar solos or wailing over era-defining mega hits. It seems that despite unpredictable lineup changes and new material, timeless classics like "Disarm" and "Tonight, Tonight" will forever be worth their weight in gold, especially when lovingly blasted through stadium speakers. Also on the bill tonight is Liz Phair, who'll bring that patented vulnerable/venomous fuzz pedal femininity that has rightfully earned her indie rock goddess status. You can bet that the atmosphere at Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall will be brimming with retroactive '90s hormones. CS

PHIL COOK, DEAD TONGUES
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Maybe you've seen Phil Cook before, playing guitar or banjo over on the side of a stage with a big ol' grin on his face. He was in Justin Vernon's pre-Bon Iver band, DeYarmond Edison, then briefly joined Akron/Family, before forming psych-folk outfit Megafaun. More recently, however, you might've seen him providing guitar and keys to Hiss Golden Messenger. Last September, Cook officially stepped out on his own with a solo debut, Southland Mission. Recorded in a studio in the Blue Ridge Mountains, Southland Mission has much more of a laidback, rollicking—dare I say jammy—feel than any of his earlier projects, and is just as at home in the foothills of Appalachia as on the corner of Haight-Ashbury. The album's cover photo of a slightly disheveled Cook, with his curly, golden locks, nerdy spectacles, and carefree grin captures the light and easy vibe within. SANTI ELIJAH HOLLEY

HUNNY, WAX IDOLS, MOTHERTAPES
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Wax Idols sound like the house band for a blacklight-themed '80s dance club run by Anne Rice's fictional vampire Lestat de Lioncourt. The Oakland post-punk outfit, led by multi-instrumentalist Hether Fortune, released their third LP, American Tragic, with the help of Monte Vallier (producer of fellow Californian new new-wave project the Soft Moon). While the album's clear goth sensibilities are reminiscent of the eerie instrumentation of Siouxsie and the Banshees or the more modern Elvis Depressedly, the distilled clarity in Fortune's front-and-center vocals are more akin to Bauhaus frontman Peter Murphy's iconic voice. Fortune is an enigmatic presence—both terrifying and wonderful—and sure to dazzle. CC

MOON DEBRIS, SWEEPING EXITS, PASS
(The Liquor Store, 3341 SE Belmont) Last year, Portland horror-punks Sweeping Exits quietly unleashed a set of demos and outtakes from their forthcoming album, Glitter and Blood. The collection of songs, available for free on their Bandcamp page, is a must-hear if you have even the slightest interest in dark and moody glam-rock. The songs unravel like a concept album, telling the tale of vampires who live in the shadows and prey on bigots and misogynists. It all makes for a startling, yet accessible collection of songs, packed with ample amounts of emotional depth, and tightly wrapped up with a sturdy pop sensibility that's chock-full of strong hooks and melodies. Sweeping Exits' ability to draw inspiration from the heyday of glam and art rock, channeling the likes of Bowie and Marc Bolan, while also taking cues from the urgent and reactionary spirit championed in early punk and queercore, make them well worth your attention. CT