GOLDEN HOUR Fri 3/25 Anarres Infoshop Natalie Eagan
THAO AND THE GET DOWN STAY DOWN Fri 3/25 Wonder Ballroom Maria Kanevskaya

WEDNESDAY 3/23

GENERAL ASSEMBLY: TALKATIVE, DAMON BOUCHER, TONALITY STAR, NEEDLE DROP DJS
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See My, What a Busy Week!

GREG DULLI, DERRICK BROWN
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Over the past few years, the literary world has praised unlikeable narrators—wholly unsavory, first-person storytellers—and the strange joys that come from entering the mind of someone you would avoid in real life. If we extend this praise to modern music, Greg Dulli—songwriter for the Afghan Whigs and the Twilight Singers—is, almost without contest, the most developed of all unlikeable narrators. With a fuzzy line between fiction and hyperbolic memoir, Dulli has, for nearly three decades, built a perpetually compelling, tortured egomaniac: a human animal stuck somewhere between feeling too intensely for his own good and not feeling anything at all. Dulli's catalog extends from foreboding rock to pseudo-funk and electro-pop, but his narrator barely wavers. With a handful of obvious exceptions, it's largely one character working through the same demons over and over. It's not always pleasant to listen to, and enjoying it doesn't typically make you feel very good about yourself, but it's always interesting. JOSHUA JAMES AMBERSON

CHAIRLIFT, LYDIA AINSWORTH
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Pay attention to Arbutus Records. They make so many good decisions. Signing Toronto electronic musician/producer/singer Lydia Ainsworth was certainly one of them. Ainsworth sings like Kate Bush from the bottom of an echoing drainpipe while she overlays her own whispered samples about gemstones and past life regression. For fans of Julia Holter and ASMR, Ainsworth's half mystical/half glitch compositions work for anytime you want to put on a shawl and feel spooky. It's also pretty danceable. I have been blowing up her Right to Real for most of the past year. Scope her 2014 cover of Chris Isaak's "Wicked Game" if you wanna fall in love. SUZETTE SMITH

TOMMY ALEXANDER, TAYLOR KINGMAN, THE HARMED BROTHERS
(The Goodfoot, 2845 SE Stark) Old News is the new album from Tommy Alexander, a singer/songwriter originally from Santa Barbara who's spent time in Burlington, Vermont, and now lives in Portland. It's an easygoing collection of scruffy tunes that find a happy ground between power-ish pop and breezy folk strumming. "Everyday, Every Dime," has a pleasant Paul Westerberg vibe, while the title track is a coiled ragtime shuffle with slide guitar and barroom piano. Alexander recorded the album at the home studio of Mike Coykendall, and its homespun origins seem about right: This is a lazy but not lazy-minded album of comfortable tunes, perfect for porch sitting and beer drinking. Alexander celebrates the release of Old News at tonight's show. NED LANNAMANN

THURSDAY 3/24

NAP EYES, CIAN NUGENT, DRAGGING AN OX THROUGH WATER
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Read our story on Nap Eyes.

ALEX G, PORCHES, YOUR FRIEND, THE REAL SMOOTHIES, CRUSHINGCRAYONS
(Analog Café, 720 SE Hawthorne) Alex G amassed a practically endless discography of masterfully lo-fi pop songs on his Bandcamp and shared 11 releases (including four full-lengths) before putting out his 2014 breakout, DSU, and subsequent physical reissues of Trick and Rules (both of which sold out). Alex G is in some ways the musical equivalent of Jess from Gilmore Girls: a sensitive, caring boy living in Philadelphia who just wants to make his art by any means necessary, seemingly without any care whether anyone hears it. Going back and listening to all of Alex G's releases might be a daunting task, but losing oneself in the delicate layers of tenderness is as rewarding as it is enjoyable. It's the perfect music for being holed up indoors in the depths of a Portland winter when summer seems as much a faded memory as something to look forward to. Or for sinking into a bus seat and forgetting you're surrounded by bozos talking on their phones. Or even for crying with an intimate friend. It might just be perfect music to get lost in. CAMERON CROWELL Also see My, What a Busy Week!

PICTUREPLANE, RELIGIOUS GIRLS, MATTRESS
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Pictureplane's Travis Egedy is a multimedia artist who makes dystopian club music for anarchic techno-refugees. Known for coining the term "witch house" to describe the rise of occult-obsessed, dark EDM, Egedy's own tracks combine an updated cyberpunk aesthetic with blown-out pop melodies and corrosive rhythms, equally drawing influence from '90s big room house hits and '80s industrial dance. On 2015's Technomancer he pays homage to the anxiety of a life lived online while flirting with new romantic synth lines and breakbeats—a sometimes dizzying blend of sounds that evokes a distress call sent from an apocalyptic rave. "Manipulate your machines," Egedy sings, suggesting that it's up to us to defend ourselves from a bleak and mechanized future. Openers Religious Girls make frantic and sometimes abrasive experimental pop to make you sweat. DANIELA SERNA

CRATE DIGGERS LIVE: TROX, SAMAREI, STEEZ, VERBZ
(Kelly's Olympian, 426 SW Washington) The Crate Diggers podcast, hosted by Portland's DJ Verbz, is entering its third year of production. Over the past two years, the podcast has featured dozens of Portland hip-hop artists, both emcees and producers, like Tope, Epp, Maze Koroma, and Blossom. Crate Diggers Live will be the first live incarnation of the podcast, which uses vinyl records as a starting point for discussion. There will be beat sets by co-host Steez, as well as past guests and producers Samarei and Trox. It will also feature a live beatmaking competition from local producers Sir Chamberlain, Rey Holliday, and Näkyooes. Verbz is becoming a Portland hip-hop legend—he's been active in the scene for nearly a decade, has been holding down the Thesis series every month for well over a year now, and also frequently DJs in town, mixing local artists with contemporary tracks in his live sets. SKYLER WALRATH

FRIDAY 3/25

ANDREW LOOMIS MEMORIAL FUNDRAISER
(Dante's, 350 W Burnside) On Tuesday, March 8, Portland lost a legend. Andrew Loomis drummed for the legendary Oregon band Dead Moon since its formation in 1987 and went on to become the torchbearer for Pacific Northwest garage rock. Loomis beat lymphoma last year, but that struggle and other health problems resulted in him leaving us too soon, at age 54. Fittingly, a memorial fundraiser is taking place tonight at Dante's, one of Loomis' favored rock dens—and a place where Dead Moon played countless times. His Dead Moon bandmates, Fred and Toody Cole, will play an acoustic set, as will a number of other friends and fellow musicians whose lives and music Loomis touched, including Breaker Breaker, Exacerbators, the Ransom, and many more. The $10 cover charge is only a suggested donation, tonight's organizers emphasize, with all proceeds going toward Loomis' funeral expenses. Come tonight, grieve for the man, and remember the amazing music. NL

SNOW ROLLER, LITTLE STAR, GOLDEN HOUR, MR. BONES
(Anarres Infoshop, 7101 N Lombard) Portland four-piece Snow Roller has navigated the local indie/punk underground for a few years, releasing three EPs leading up to their upcoming debut full-length, What's the Score? (Broken World Media/Good Cheer Records). This all-ages show will celebrate Snow Roller's new album with a stacked lineup of friends—Little Star, Golden Hour, and Mr. Bones. The record reveals primary songwriter Collin Kritz's undying love for the guitar-driven pop spectrum, with songs ranging from Pinkerton-era pop-punk ("Fritz Brickle"), to twinkle-emo ("Living the Dreamshake"), to alt-country ("Snot"), to straight-up '90s indie ("Too Good"), to some fantastic combination of all of the above. On the penultimate song, "Say More," the riffs guitarist Tyler Bussey (of the World Is a Beautiful Place and I Am No Longer Afraid to Die) plays are utterly baffling, going from crunchy to sounding almost like a violin in the span of four minutes. CC

FRANKIE AND THE WITCH FINGERS, COMA SERFS, DYSLEXICS THE
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) Frankie and the Witch Fingers are keeping the garage-rock caboose rolling in Los Angeles alongside the city's more notable practitioners, Ty Segall and Thee Oh Sees. The out-there sounds on their self-titled debut feel both familiar and new, clogged with fuzz and warmed by a Farfisa blanket. Locals Coma Serfs are no less scrappy, with an equally sophisticated take on Nuggets-era nuggets. Rounding out the bill are Dyslexics The (see what they did there?), whose lo-fi cassette release, Distorted Paranoia, belies the bigger, jagged power-pop noise they bring to the stage. This newish Portland power trio doesn't necessarily adhere to a particular era (the spirit of the Wipers looms), but they will ably add to a bill that could best be described as the soundtrack for a sock hop on Mars. MARK LORE

QUILT, MILD HIGH CLUB, ETERNAL TAPESTRY
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Quilt's sophomore album, 2014's Held in Splendor, was a lovely little record of skeletal psych-folk from a tribe of New England neo-hippies. It was heavier on the "folk" than the "psych," but most of all it showcased the band's natural knack for a memorable melody and hinted at a very promising future. Now Quilt is back to make good on that promise with their third album, Plaza, which is a sizable step forward from Held in Splendor. Released by Mexican Summer in February, Plaza features fully formed ideas in place of the occasional song sketch, and sturdier arrangements where Quilt once seemed a bit sheepish. Anna Fox Rochinski and Shane Butler share vocal duties, and both sound stronger and more self-assured than they did previously. Simply put: Plaza fulfills Quilt's considerable potential. Where they go from here will be a treat to watch, but for now, just be present tonight at Mississippi Studios. BEN SALMON

PETER FRAMPTON, JULIAN FRAMPTON
(Revolution Hall, 1300 SE Stark) It'd probably be pretty difficult to find a stack of discounted records that didn't contain at least one copy of Frampton Comes Alive!, an album rivaled only by Billy Joel's Piano Man and Supertramp's Breakfast in America in budget-bin ubiquity (a fact deftly parodied in Wayne's World 2, when Wayne's well-intentioned girlfriend Cassandra buys him a copy—"Everybody in the world has a copy of Frampton Comes Alive!," Wayne quips, "It came in the mail with samples of Tide"). Frampton Comes Alive! is by no means flawless, and its biggest single "Show Me the Way" is among the most polarizing in the classic rock canon (two words: talk box)—but along with Kiss Alive and Cheap Trick's Live at Budokon, it's the record that typifies the rock 'n' roll "live album," a medium that, for a time, was equally if not more viable than the traditional studio recording. More essential listening: the first four Humble Pie records, which feature Frampton alongside similarly underrated ripper, former Small Faces vocalist Steve Marriott. MORGAN TROPER

THAO AND THE GET DOWN STAY DOWN, CAR SEAT HEADREST
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Thao Nyugen of Thao and the Get Down Stay Down has taken a solid risk with her latest, A Man Alive. Ever poignant with her lyrics, this time around Nyugen enters personal territory, singing about her father abandoning her when she was young. The San Francisco artist teamed up with fellow Bay Area pioneer Merrill Garbus of Tune-Yards, creating a musical palette that is daring, ripping apart the folk-pop of her previous efforts at the seams. Fans of Garbus will find the album's rhythmic movement, war chants, and electronic influences familiar territory. Yet at the core of it all is Nyugen's confessional tone that bravely yells out, calling to her legions to sing along and claim a voice of their own: "I'll show you the mettle I'm made of." JENI WREN STOTTRUP Also see My, What a Busy Week!

SATURDAY 3/26

HINDS, COTILLON
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Carlotta Cosials and Ana García Perrote started writing songs under the name Deers in 2011 (it's some Spanish joke about ex-boyfriends that doesn't translate easily into English), but Montreal indie band the Dears lawyered up and forced them to change their name to Hinds (another deer gag). Along the way, they filled out their surf-rock/garage-gaze lineup into an all-woman party foursome. Interviews with them are as abysmal as you would expect for any all-female group. They get questions about their dating histories. How did they get their drummer? She was a fan of their band. Duh! Hinds has a relentlessly positive, shake-it-off attitude, and their shows are hella fun and psych. Reminiscent of a further out Black Lips or Thee Oh Sees, Hinds really kills it with their complex vocal harmonies. Take your shoes off. This is one of those sand parties. SS Also see My, What a Busy Week!

YOUNG HUNTER, CAMBRIAN EXPLOSION, MAMMOTH SALMON
(Black Water Bar, 835 NE Broadway) With a solid backbone of stoner-rock riffage and doom-metal grandeur, local band Young Hunter manages to touch on an ethereal sound outside of genre, something we've seen glimpses of in Northwest music over the last few years: Wolves in the Throne Room's collaborations with Jessika Skeletalia Kenney, moments of Mount Eerie's Wind's Poem, Broken Water's collaborative album with Lori Goldston. It's music with a weighted prettiness that could arguably owe as much to Leonard Cohen or Brian Eno as it does to Sabbath. Young Hunter's new self-titled album, the release of which is being celebrated tonight, is masterful in this interplay between genre and elusive non-genre. Against huge dynamic fluctuations, Benjamin Blake and Sara Pinnell's traded vocals gorgeously paint a picture of a not-too-distant future where nature decides to take back some of what it let us borrow. JJA

COOL GHOULS, ADULT BOOKS, PSYCHOMAGIC
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Can't make it to Treefort? The Boise festival continues to bulk up each year with better and better lineups, and fortunately for Portlanders, some artists tend to make pit stops in town, like Cool Ghouls. The bleary-eyed surf poppers' psychedelic haze tempers their peaks of chaos with a rock 'n' roll edge. Post-Treefort, they'll be stopping at Bunk Bar. If you've ever gone to a show at Bunk Bar, you know it can feel like a full-fledged festival in a storage unit. Bring your dancing shoes. ROBIN BACIOR

JLIN, DJ NOIR, LINCOLNUP, RAP CLASS, ILLORDESS
(S1, 4148 NE Hancock) The music of Jlin (Jerrilynn Patton) has sharp angles and constantly winding grooves characterized by minimalism and restraint. It's often housed under a genre called footwork, an offshoot of Chicago house that is rising in popularity. It's known for a street beat sound that inspires a form of frenetic battle dance where dancers' feet fly at insane speeds, reminiscent of the breakdancing footwork popularized in the '80s. Patton has made a name for herself with releases on the prestigious Planet Mu label with unique-sounding tracks that don't fully rely on sampling. Instead they focus on generating sounds with spacious, rhythmic complexity and an aggressive tone, so much so that some listeners assumed she was male. Her latest EP, Free Fall, has an electric quality that makes an impressive cultural statement in a world marked by conflict. CHRISTINA BROUSSARD

SUNDAY 3/27

WHITE DENIM, SAM COHEN
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

DREAMDECAY, PRIVATE ROOM, PANZER BEAT
(Black Water Bar, 835 NE Broadway) See All-Ages Action!

THE MYNABIRDS, LENORE
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) The Mynabirds' current West Coast jaunt isn't a repeat of past performances. Laura Burhenn (singer, songwriter, and head of the rotating Mynabird flock) will be offering "new, intimate, and orchestral" arrangements of her band's three-album catalog. I can't tell you exactly what that will entail—"intimate" suggests small, while "orchestral" suggests very, very big—but I think it's safe to expect a violin or two. These reworkings will provide a marked counterpoint to the digital timbres on her recent Lovers Know, which saw Burhenn expanding upon the amber-tinted classic-soul vibe she uncovered on the Mynabirds' splendid debut, 2010's What We Lose in the Fire We Gain in the Flood. But with Burhenn's affecting, expert songs as fuel, tonight's likely to be pretty spellbinding, regardless of the form the music takes. NL

AUDIOS AMIGOS, WILD POWWERS, RLLRBLL
(Kenton Club, 2025 N Kilpatrick) You would be hard pressed to find a band that symbolizes Portland, Oregon, better than Audios Amigos. The membership of this instrumental supergroup has been proudly grinding out their dues in notable local bands such as Don't and Thee Headliners for years, and this punk pedigree ensures that a razor's edge is always present in their spaghetti-western-meets-breezy-surf-rock motifs. Highlighted by intricate rhythms and flourishing guitar interplay, these eclectic dynamics result in a sound that is at once progressive country pastiche, muscular mariachi, and pure Northwest spirituality. In fact, listen to these unique soundscapes and they will provide the perfect backdrop to our rain-swept terrain and silver-hued skies. Better yet, replace the sound from a scene in one of your favorite classic Gus Van Sant films with one of their twangy masterpieces and the aural aesthetic would probably synchronize beautifully. CHRIS SUTTON

SATAN, DANAVA, VIOLATION WOUND, DENNIS DREAD
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) It's a slippery slope for classic, underground heavy metal bands that are still releasing records in their later years. Their new material either ends up sounding forced because they tried too hard to rehash their former glories, or they lean too much on modern production and end up alienating fans who want to hear them sound like they did back in the day. But with any generalization there are always exceptions, and England's Satan is one of them. Not only does their 2015 release Atom by Atom feature the same lineup as their timeless 1983 release Court in the Act, but Steve Ramsey and Russ Tippins' stellar, underrated guitar work and an outstanding vocal performance from Brian Ross shows the band is still spry and writing material that's worthy of their status as New Wave of British Heavy Metal champions. The power of Christ compels you, but Satan has better tunes. Enjoy. ARIS HUNTER WALES

SNOW ROLLER, MO TROPER, HASTE
(Rontoms, 600 E Burnside) Good Cheer Records releases the kind of garage rock that made Weezer famous: four-on-the-floor beats, unison guitar, and clear, uplifting vocals that leave you nodding your head in the back of your parents' car. Recently, though, the label has stepped away from this, with an expanding roster of artists focused on strong songwriting and a DIY ethos. Their Rontoms showcase includes Snow Roller, who are invariably true to this sound, and Merc contributor Mo Troper, whose strong upcoming full-length (and the label's first vinyl) dabbles in the kind of feel-good rock made famous by bands like Ben Folds and Foo Fighters. Rounding out the bill is Haste, who, while not on the label yet, are distinctive of the statement Good Cheer tries to make clear: Don't pigeonhole us, but do expect the unexpected. JWS

MONDAY 3/28

JOANNA NEWSOM, ROBIN PECKNOLD
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) See My, What a Busy Week!, and read our story on Joanna Newsom.

WEATHERBOX, PRAWN, ENEMIES, UNCONDITIONAL ARMS
(Twilight Café and Bar, 1420 SE Powell) Among the current wave of guitar-rock bands that draw influence from the late '90s and early 2000s, New Jersey's Prawn sounds like Appleseed Cast's arithmetic, heartland-rock mixed with Photo Album-era Death Cab for Cutie crescendo-pop, but with well-placed, life-affirming horn parts sprinkled in here and there. Which is to say that if you are one of those folks who believe guitars are done and indie rock is dead, Prawn may not be for you. But if you like this stuff, Prawn's one of the best bands out there doing it (and there are a lot of bands out there doing it right now). They're also not on this side of the country all that often, so see 'em while you can. Also on tonight's bill: veteran San Diego emo/punk band Weatherbox and effervescent Irish post-rock band Enemies. BS

YUCK, BIG THIEF, LITTLE STAR
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Although Yuck aren't teenagers anymore, the youthful exuberance that characterized 2011's self-titled debut hasn't gone anywhere—their third, Stranger Things, is a brash wrecking ball of an album, spangled with overdriven guitars and guilelessly hooky melodies. The main difference is the continued shift from former frontman Daniel Blumberg to co-founder Max Bloom, following Blumberg's departure just prior to the second Yuck album, 2013's Glow & Behold. The new one, again with Bloom at the tiller, is not quite as stoned-out as Glow was, and the Londoners have made a radio-friendly sound that embraces English rock and Britpop influences (as opposed to the Pavement, Dinosaur Jr., and Sonic Youth hangovers that characterized Yuck's early work). Stranger Things' compact songs and confident delivery sound fine on earbuds or in the car, but they don't seem to possess much depth beyond that—although the title track's sing-songy refrain of "I hate myself" is a definite keeper. NL

TUESDAY 3/29

IGGY POP, NOVELLER
(Keller Auditorium, 222 SW Clay) See My, What a Busy Week!

STEVE HACKETT
(Revolution Hall, 1300 SE Stark) Read our story on Steve Hackett.

INTO IT OVER IT, THE WORLD IS A BEAUTIFUL PLACE AND I AM NO LONGER AFRAID TO DIE, THE SIDEKICKS, PINEGROVE
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) Read our story on Pinegrove.

SIOUX FALLS, HAYBABY, DEATHLIST
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) Deathlist is the solo recording project of Summer Cannibals bassist Jenny Logan. Tonight celebrates the cassette release of her self-titled debut, six tracks of frenzied punk rock that riff wildly until they're caught in a buzzy entanglement of guitar-driven chaos. Standout track "Every Wish" plays like a slow-dance duet sung by these hyperactive electric guitar parts and Logan, who asks in a subdued tone, "How do you know it ends tonight?" Tonight Maggie May Morris (Genders) and Riley Borne (Putts, Comm) will join Logan onstage, with NYC's self-described "sludge pop" trio Haybaby and local post-rock, yolo-fi dudes Sioux Falls closing out the night. CIARA DOLAN

WARREN HAYNES, JONATHAN TYLER
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) As a former member of the Allman Brothers Band, a touring member of the Dead, and leader of his own blues-rock band Gov't Mule, Warren Haynes has, in many respects, lived the quintessential American rock 'n' roll life. Haynes is among a dying breed of guitar gods, versatile enough to lend his chops to everyone from David Allan Coe to Corrosion of Conformity, though he's released only a handful of records under his own name. For his most recent album, last year's Ashes and Dust, Haynes enlisted the help of jam band Railroad Earth, dusted off a bunch of his old songs from the last 30 years, and gave them a rootsy working-over, resulting in his folkiest-sounding collection to date. Is it good? If you're a diehard fan of Haynes, you'll probably love anything his does. But if you're looking for the heavy blues and killer guitar licks Haynes is famous for, you might want to hold off on this one. SANTI ELIJAH HOLLEY

MOTHERS, ALL DOGS, HALEY HEYNDERICKX
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) All Dogs singer and guitarist Maryn Jones is 2016's embodiment of a renaissance shredder. Jones joined Saintseneca in 2011, began playing as All Dogs in 2012 with Amanda Bartley, and recently released her mesmerizing, spooky debut, The Offer, as her solo project Yowler (she'll return to Portland as Yowler to open for Frankie Cosmos next month). She also sings the absolutely stunning Radiator Hospital track "Fireworks" off 2014's Torch Song. Last year All Dogs released their first full-length, Kicking Every Day, which sounds like pop songs that fell down a staircase—a little bruised, but despite the injuries, still sunny, melodic pop songs. All Dogs sounds like endurance: making it through a cold winter and seeing the first dewy blooms of spring, healing emotional wounds and starting to feel good again. As a side note, I really hope they're named after the best movie ever All Dogs Go to Heaven. CD