JOSHUA REDMAN QUARTET Wed 6/15 Jimmy Mak’s Jay Blakesberg

WEDNESDAY 6/15

JOHN CARPENTER
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) See Things to Do, and read our story on John Carpenter.

JOSHUA REDMAN QUARTET
(Jimmy Mak's, 221 NW 10th) Since winning the Thelonious Monk International Jazz Saxophone Competition in 1991, Joshua Redman has cultivated the kind of career that seems almost scripted. His 1993 self-titled debut earned him a Grammy nomination, and he has appeared on dozens of LPs as both bandleader and sideman. His versatility as a player has allowed him to work with a varied cross-section of players, from jazz icons like Dave Brubeck and Pat Metheny to jam band Umphrey's McGee and hip-hop legend Big Daddy Kane. And somewhere along the way, he managed to show up in Blues Brothers 2000. Redman arrives in Portland on the heels of his collaborative album with the Bad Plus, where he smoothly worked his fluid, expressive tone into the band's often-angular compositions. For his two shows tonight, Redman will be joined by his regular backing group: pianist Aaron Goldberg, bassist Reuben Rogers, and drummer Gregory Hutchinson. ROBERT HAM

THE DOMESTICS, 1939 ENSEMBLE, MOOREA MASA
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Two years ago at a secret show in a Southeast Portland restaurant, an unknown band made its debut. This band was the Domestics, then just Michael Finn and Leo London. The show was the first in Double Dragon's secret summer pop-up series presented by Portland audio-documentarians Banana Stand Media. The contemplative rockers' set left a mark, as did their outstanding 2015 self-titled release. Last year they returned to the Banana Stand to record a live album, which comes out this week. It features tracks from their debut as well as new songs like "Montgomery Park." The live album will tide fans and newcomers over until the Domestics' next full-length is released in the coming months. JENI WREN STOTTRUP

LABRYSE, OX
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) Labryse holds it down for queer heshers, appealing to those who like their music extreme, thrashy, and blackened. The metal four-piece has been refining their sound at Portland clubs and house shows after debuting a few years ago at the Not Enough Festival. They've gained a steady following among those who appreciate their soulful heaviness and chops, mixing elements of different metal genres and hardcore. Tonight celebrates their self-released LP, Ex Nocte Aeterna, recorded by Jeremy Romagna at Type Foundry and mixed and mastered by Radio Sloan at Castle Gayskull. It's also said to be virtuoso guitarist Ash Juno Inferna's last show with the band, which will likely add energy and poignancy to this Queer Aggression showcase. HALEY WESTEINER

CHERRY GLAZERR Thurs 6/16 Lola's Room Rhyan Santos & Drawing by Tyler Spangle

THURSDAY 6/16

MAC SABBATH, SPAZZTIC BLURR
(Dante's, 350 W Burnside) Portland's a place where burgers are worshipped and Black Sabbath is everyone's savior. While a Quarter Pounder may not stand up to the city's artisanal burgers, Mac Sabbath satiates our hunger for satirical metal holiness. Mixing only the finest parts of McDonald's fast food foolery with the brazen influence of the heavy metal legends, Mac Sabbath transforms classic anthems into comedy. "Iron Man" becomes "Frying Pan," "Never Say Die" becomes "Never Say Diet," and who could resist taking a big bite out of "Sweet Beef" ("Sweet Leaf")? Watch Ronald Osbourne belt out with Slayer MacCheeze, Grimalice, and Catburgler in all of their sardonic glory. CERVANTE POPE

GREX, ALTO!, NOAH BERNSTEIN
(Kenton Club, 2025 N Kilpatrick) Alto!'s inherent otherness is so engaging it's futile to conjure up fitting adjectives. Suffice it to say that the experimental wunderkinds are on a roll, and the proof is in their new album, LP 3, which sees its local unveiling tonight. The record, which will officially be released on June 17 by Trouble in Mind, is a wormhole of sonic delights. Like a mirror-dimension tribal boogie, "Piece Fourteen" wriggles with synth bloops and whistles, jockeying for position in a bizarro digital rain dance. At just three tracks long, the album boasts long-winded compositions of experimental drones and rhythms, coaxing exciting aural meditations from the spaces between repetitions. "Piece Twelve" starts out starkly, fussing in an Ennio Morricone-style western desertedness. Suddenly the bottom drops out, the guitars become dangerous weapons of sonic bludgeoning, and five minutes of doomy heaviness commence before an ayahuasca cool-down. Alto!'s strongest suit is their unwillingness to be any one thing, and on LP 3 they flaunt this tenet. RYAN J. PRADO

CHERRY GLAZERR, SEX STAINS
(Lola's Room, 1332 W Burnside) Cherry Glazerr skipped puberty. Since their 2013 debut, Haxel Princess, the LA noise-pop group's made some major sound and personnel changes without revealing any growing pains. Their signature jangly psych-pop songs revel in youth without fetishizing it; "White's Not My Color This Evening" is a high-octane track about how much periods suck. Their newest material, the 2014 singles "Had 10 Dollaz" and "Nurse Ratched," are infused with some ready-to-thrash punk, a transition made natural as the band fully embraces the sardonic wit and guitar shreds that were only hinted at on prior albums. With the original Cherry Glazerr crew—singer/guitarist Clementine Creevy and bassist Sean Redman—now joined by two new band members, the last year could have been tumultuous. But based on their dark and catchy recent singles and decision to tour with Sex Stains, a riot grrl redux fronted by past Bratmobile member Allison Wolfe, Cherry Glazerr is figuring out their identity while shrugging off any notion of an awkward phase. EMMA BURKE

FRIDAY 6/17

THE GROWLERS, DJ JOHNNY BASIL
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) See Things to Do.

WUSSY, CHRIS BROKAW, RUBELLA GRAVES
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) Read our story on Wussy.

EDWARD SHARPE AND THE MAGNETIC ZEROS, PRESERVATION HALL JAZZ BAND, HARRIET
(Edgefield, 2126 SW Halsey, Troutdale) There's always been something a little fishy about Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros, from the band's fraudulent name—the man-bunned frontman was actually born Alex Ebert—to the dusky sound of their Kelvin-filtered folk. Ebert even seems tired of his own shtick on the Los Angeles collective's latest album, the irritatingly titled Person A (as in Persona, get it?), in which his alter ego's name is crossed out on the cover. The record is full of deliberately unappealing twists on their stomp-clap car-commercial sound, which could be construed as a righteous rejection of the Urban Outfitters-core they were responsible for pioneering, but instead it feels like a desperate veiling of a lack of fresh ideas. NED LANNAMANN

TOGETHER PANGEA, PATSY'S RATS
(Analog Café, 720 SE Hawthorne) Together Pangea emerged with the early 2010s resurgence of Southern California '90s skate punk alongside bands like FIDLAR and Wavves—bands with simple crunchy chord progressions, slurred sing-along anthems, and a stockpile of similar but nonetheless supremely catchy riffs. I first saw Together Pangea at the free all-ages festival Echo Park Rising (the LA equivalent to PDX Pop Now!), where the band filled an indoor stage with a swell of elbowing teenage bodies. Some asshole in a Thrasher magazine T-shirt stage-dove with skateboard in hand, hitting a woman in the front row in the head with the board's trucks. She started to bleed and looked faint, but couldn't get out through the crowd of people. Together Pangea stopped playing and a bouncer pulled her onstage and out the back door as frontman William Keegan told the skater boy to get the fuck out. While I don't think the band is to blame, it was a reminder that skate punk tends to attract some of the most entitled and toxic men to shows. CAMERON CROWELL

LULUC, TYSON MOTSENBOCKER
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) In 2014, Australian duo Luluc proved that understatement can still thrive in today's overhyped, trend-laden music business with the release of their sophomore album, Passerby. Tote bag-bearing public radio lovers jumped on the Luluc bandwagon while critics gushed over refined songs like "Small Window." The pair's gentle, pared-down indie folk garnered comparisons to their predecessor in subtle songwriting, Nick Drake, after their 2008 debut, Dear Hamlyn, a carefully crafted album of enduring, lullaby-like songs. Made up of Zoë Randell and Steve Hassett, Luluc is a quiet presence on stage. Expect a toned-down show and flawless execution. ANNA McCLAIN

SONNY & THE SUNSETS, SARAH BETHE NELSON, GONZO
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Sonny Smith—songwriter and frontman of Sonny and the Sunsets—has kept up a steady musical output since the early '00s, even if most of it kind of blends together over time. Smith has made fuzzed-out, stoner surf-pop his calling card, though few do it better or with more prolificacy. With the latest Sunsets record, Moods Baby Moods, Smith brought Merrill Garbus of Tune-Yards onboard as producer, but her contributions are not limited merely to knob twiddling and credit taking. Garbus adds multiple layers of sounds missing from previous Sunsets' records, including bongos, synths, beeps, and bips, and sings backup vocals on most songs, making Moods Baby Moods perhaps the most collaborative (and funky!) Sunsets record to date. SANTI ELIJAH HOLLEY

SATURDAY 6/18

PLAYGROUND PDX PRIDE: LADY MISS KIER, SAPPHO, DAVID SYLVESTER
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Read our story on Lady Miss Kier.

WIZARD RIFLE, ZIRAKZIGIL, TINY KNIVES, STRESS POSITION
(Panic Room, 3100 NE Sandy) The members of Zirakzigil have put in their time in Portland's remarkable and tight-knit metal scene over the past three years. The hard work has paid off, as the band recently opened for Swedish noisers Suma and will soon embark on a West Coast tour with New York's Wizard Rifle. Zirakzigil also recently signed with Prosthetic Records (Skeletonwitch, Holy Grail), which will re-release the band's excellent and overlooked 2015 record Worldbuilder. The album builds upon their 2013 debut, Battle of the Peak, bringing a much heavier and sludgier take on Rush's Tolkien-inspired prog. Songs like "Terra Perricolosa" and "Will and Presentation" are relentless and engrossing, and will hopefully seep into more ears in 2016. Rounding out the bill are tourmates Wizard Rifle, and locals Stress Position and Tiny Knives. Guaranteed to melt off all appendages. MARK LORE

JMSN, SNOH AALEGRA
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Multi-instrumentalist, producer, and singer/songwriter JMSN (pronounced Jameson) premiered his new album It Is in early May. Here his R&B slow jams are given an innovative twist with jazzy and orchestral elements. In his music videos JMSN demonstrates a similar creative playfulness, dancing on top of rooftops and cars while pouring his heart out. Raised in Detroit, the now LA-based artist pays true homage to his roots with big horns and beautiful, smooth vocals. With an obstacle-filled personal and professional history (his former record label shut down unexpectedly), JMSN brings genuine heart and soul to his music. EMILY VANKOUGHNETT

HERON OBLIVION, HEATHER WOODS BRODERICK, THE LAVENDER FLU
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) The first thing that stands out in Heron Oblivion's music is the starkly beautiful voice emanating from drummer/vocalist Meg Baird. It soon becomes clear that these lilting tones are merely an introduction to the tortured interplay between guitarists Noel Von Harmonson and Charlie Saufley. While Baird and bassist Ethan Miller put down simple, earthy rhythms, Von Harmonson and Saufley take turns shooting fire and ice through increasingly stretched amplification while the strings on their instruments scream and cry with strangled emotion. Like the Cowboy Junkies residing in a Crazy Horse netherworld, or perhaps J Mascis producing a young Jefferson Airplane, Heron Oblivion's music balances perfectly between heaven and pain, transforming minimalist melancholy into an ecstatic siren call. The overall result is an atmospheric meditation worthy of the highest praise. CHRIS SUTTON

SLEEPTALKER, HURRY UP, WHITE GLOVE
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) Sleeptalker's 2014 album Big Dream was one of the pleasant local surprises of that year, with its baker's dozen blasts of bracing punk rock that were both super catchy and sans frills. Two years later, not much has changed. Sleeptalker is back with a new album called Dead Tubes, and it's more of the same, but better. Punchier songs. Tighter arrangements. Higher fidelity. And those hooks! Hooks for days, friends. For those who like facts, Sleeptalker is Luke Clements (Old Growth, Science of Yabra), Jeff Taylor (Organized Sports), and Joe Vanaman (Philly's Luxury Flats). Give Dead Tubes a spin, and then hit up the Know to help Sleeptalker celebrate the album's release with like-minded locals White Glove and Hurry Up. BEN SALMON

SUNDAY 6/19

SUUNS, MY BODY
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Suuns amp up their already hypnotically nerve-racking sound on their third album, this year's Hold/Still. Having proven their expertise at slowly building tension and leaving you hanging with their first two albums, they're now going weirder, darker, and more dissonant—and it works. The percussion is mesmeric under swirling, circuital guitar riffs and the drone of strange and foreboding synths. This industrial psychedelia is bold and compelling, with an anxious feeling that isn't timid, but self-assured. Seeing this live will probably feel like entering a scene from a stylishly gritty, Matrix-esque dystopian thriller. FIONA GABRIELLE WOODMAN

R. ARIEL, LITTLE STAR, FOUNTAINE, BRI WHITE
(Valentine's, 232 SW Ankeny) Coming off her new album, Identified Demon, which she wrote, recorded, mixed, and mastered herself, this week R.Ariel is stopping by Valentine's. Her new project is hypnotic, with beautiful vocal repetitions and a tinge of R&B. She's currently on a 30-plus city tour of the United States and Canada, and she wrote a stream-of-consciousness book about her last North American tour, which she says gives readers a "very raw idea of what [her] history is and what the future looks like." Also performing are R.Ariel collaborator and fellow Phoenix artist Bri White, local hip-hop artist Fountaine, and melancholy Portland trio Little Star. SKYLER WALRATH

ERIN TOBEY Mon 6/20 Turn! Turn! Turn! Chaz Mottinger

MONDAY 6/20

STEPHEN STEINBRINK, ERIN TOBEY, WEIRD CACTUS
(Turn! Turn! Turn!, 8 NE Killingsworth) See Things to Do.

TUESDAY 6/21

PLANTS & ANIMALS, ROYAL CANOE
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) See Things to Do.

BETH ORTON, EMMY THE GREAT
(Revolution Hall, 1300 SE Stark) Beth Orton's 20-year career has been an unlikely, cognitively dissonant affair. Her '90s albums sat somewhere between '60s British folk revival, Lilith Fair compilations, and rave down-tempo tents. She was an early '00s dorm room staple, a diva of UK trip-hop, and managed to have successful collaborations with both Emmylou Harris and the Chemical Brothers. I once saw her play achingly beautiful chamber-folk versions of her songs with a string quartet, and follow each with a story more crude and hilarious than the last. In recent weeks, many have come to know Orton for illegally spray-painting a protected Joshua tree in her now-removed music video for "1973." In those same weeks she released her most cohesive album to date, Kidsticks. Following two Jim O'Rourke-produced albums that seemed to relegate her to the graveyard of adult alternative irrelevance, Orton's new record is a largely electronic effort that slowly reveals itself to be a gorgeous, thought-out album of bass-heavy heartbreak. JOSHUA JAMES AMBERSON