G.L.O.S.S. Downright pissed. Photo via G.L.O.S.S.’ Bandcamp

WHILE MANY PUNK COMMUNITIES pride themselves on being anti-establishment and -oppressive institutions, the scene has historically been run by and for cis white dudes.

Instead of remaining unseen and unheard on the sidelines, vocalist and trans femme Sadie Switchblade challenged the decidedly unpunk by starting a band. With the help of longtime friend and guitarist, Jake Bison, the duo paired up with a blend of Olympia natives and Bostonians: Corey Evans (drums), Tannrr Hainsworth (guitar), and Julaya Antolin (bass). The quintet lives up to their namesake—an acronym for “Girls Living Outside Society’s Shit”—and isn’t afraid to shout against repression and the patriarchy. Each and every song they release effectively shakes up the hardcore community a bit more and makes way for true inclusivity.

The band first shot to fame last year after debuting a killer demo. Soon after they were thrust back into the spotlight at the hands of a very public transphobic Twitter attack from shoegaze saps Whirr. A small bit of justice was served when Whirr was dropped from their label—but that’s not important anymore, and G.L.O.S.S. will tell you so themselves. What’s important is the music. The band’s unapologetic follow-up EP, Trans Day of Revenge, dropped exactly one day after the mass shooting in Orlando in June. The entire album feels as raw as an open wound that’s fighting off an impending infection, only in this case, that infection is capitalist society.

A closer listen reveals that solidarity is at the core of G.L.O.S.S.’s sweat-soaked songs. Abusers, racist cops, and the corrupt judicial system are equally called out and combated. On Trans Day of Revenge, G.L.O.S.S. is downright pissed. In a society where violence rules all, sometimes it only makes sense to match the aggression and keep on fighting back.