SHANNON AND THE CLAMS Sat 10/8 AudioCinema Nadia Lee Cohen
FRANKIE COSMOS Wed 10/5 Bossanova Ballroom Landon Speers

WEDNESDAY 10/5

DANNY BROWN, MAXO KREAM, ZELOOPERZ
(Roseland, 10 NW 6th) Detroit’s tumultuous history has always imbued its musical icons with a unique edginess, especially in hip-hop. One of the latest outsider denizens to freak out the pop world is Danny Brown, whose music resides in the space between fellow Michigan antiheroes J Dilla and Insane Clown Posse. Brown espouses intense psych-apocalyptic visions, but remains grounded in the ghetto rhythms of his harsh upbringing. Like Eminem and Kid Rock, however, as of late he’s been marking his territory with a cartoonishly cerebral look and equally wild behavior. This combination has garnered rabid fans and appearances on the Billboard charts, making Mr. Brown arguably the most outrageous rap superstar since Ol’ Dirty Bastard. His much-anticipated forthcoming LP, Atrocity Exhibition, promises to deliver more stories from the twisted dregs of his meager surroundings—albatrosses he flamboyantly wears like shiny gold chains. CHRIS SUTTON

FRANKIE COSMOS, IJI, FLOATING ROOM
(Bossanova Ballroom, 722 E Burnside) Next Thing is the 51st release from New York songwriter Greta Kline, the 21st under the Frankie Cosmos moniker, and her second recorded in a studio with a full band. To my ears, Next Thing is where Frankie Cosmos changes from Kline’s bedroom project to a full-fledged band. While 2014’s Zentropy felt like Kline backed up by some talented friends, Next Thing is filled with well-worked, subtly complex two-minute masterpieces of ‘50s bubblegum-inspired, Slumberland-esque power-pop. On the surface, Kline’s lyrics are quintessentially, almost stereotypically twee—adventures, friends, break-ups, enjoyable snack foods—but after a few listens, her lyrics unfold and open into something remarkable. They’re inspiring and humorous, playfully on-the-nose and surprisingly sneaky. At their best, her songs create much-needed anthems for the formerly painfully shy. Next Thing’s highlight, “Embody,” is her most distilled mantra (“Someday in bravery/I’ll embody/All the grace and lightness”) for those of us still involved in the lifelong process of coming out of our shells. JOSHUA JAMES AMBERSON

THURSDAY 10/6

NICK JAINA, CATHERINE FEENY, CHRIS JOHNEDIS
(The Liquor Store, 3341 SE Belmont) Although Brutal Lives’ sideways arrangements and inward-looking lyrics might not immediately suggest it, a new album from musician/author Nick Jaina is always cause for celebration. Tonight the Portland luminary plays a record release show with a three-piece band to help him drive home those lucid, wry observations of heartbreak and humanity. NED LANNAMANN

PHANTOGRAM, THE RANGE
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) Over the years, Phantogram have made their presence known as arbiters of dark and danceable tunes. They’re experts at blending a variety of genres, owning a rare aesthetic that cherry-picks different musical elements from all styles. Would you expect anything less from a band that’s worked with the one and only Big Boi? This fall they’re touring in support of their forthcoming release, Three, which features the single “You Don’t Get Me High Anymore”—a song they say is about the redundancy of music and pop culture. So you’d best go see Phantogram now, before they don’t get you high anymore. GUADALUPE TRIANA

FRIDAY 10/7

LOSE YR MIND FEST: BEACH FOSSILS, THE SHIVAS, THE WOOLEN MEN, CANDACE
(AudioCinema, 226 SE Madison) This weekend marks the third annual Lose Yr Mind Fest, which brings a raucous three days of grimy surf-punk to a warehouse near you, kicking off with performances from Brooklyn dream pop quartet Beach Fossils, and a stacked line-up of locals, featuring The Shivas, The Woolen Men, and Candace.

SWEEPING EXITS, DIM DESIRES, ROD, RILED
(Anarres Infoshop, 7101 N Lombard) As we ease into Portland’s dark, dank fall season, Rod helps us reflect on a bygone summer. Even as lead singer Tommy Celt breaches from pop-punk croon into screamer territory, Rod’s songs are loaded with humid pleasantries. Pretty Sure is a catchy, fun departure from Rod’s prior releases; here the band owns a very relatable feeling of reckless abandon. The album’s lead single, “Cemetery,” clocks in at a minute and a half, and by the end you feel like you’ve just sprinted on hot asphalt. MORGAN TROPER

JOYCE MANOR, THE HOTELIER, CRYING
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) Home, Like Noplace Is There, the Hotelier’s 2014 breakthrough, remains a tour de force of emotional and musical competency. The record’s cover, an image of a dark suburban home, rings in feelings of residential ennui and youthful despair, which the Hotelier express in a way that’s validating, consoling, and mature. Their lyrics are as despondent and soaked in cafard as the cover’s suburban tableau, and are delivered in histrionic belting. Since then, the band has continued to grow; their May release, Goodness, is still emotionally divulging, but its gutting disinterest is cut with the optimism that comes with growing up and out of existential adolescence. Also read our story on Joyce Manor

GREG BROWN
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) The cult of the American songwriter centers on personality, but that’s never been a problem for Greg Brown. The Iowa-born singer made his name on a run of albums from the late-’80s to early-’00s that blend folksy Midwestern storytelling with a strong dose of his freewheeling, pissing-shirtless-under-the-stars brand of charm. It’s not far from the lyrical tropes exaggerated to the point of kitsch on pop-country radio, and there’s no denying that a listener’s appreciation for Brown likely rests on whether they think an aging white man has anything interesting to say about America in 2016. But there’s also no denying that Brown’s best songs—like “Brand New ’64 Dodge,” which tackles the loss of innocence in the wake of JFK’s assassination without ever mentioning the event itself—exhibit a lyrical deftness that explains why so many consider him a national treasure. NATHAN TUCKER

LIZ VICE, AMBER SWEENEY
(Mission Theater, 1624 NW Glisan) Liz Vice is labeled a gospel singer, but that’s not a completely accurate descriptor. Yes, her songs are almost solely dedicated to all things Jesus, but Vice’s music owes more to soul-influenced gospel than to tambourine-shaking revivalism—she’s more Mavis Staples than Mahalia Jackson. Her debut, There’s a Light, was quietly released in 2015, and since then she’s garnered much-deserved praise (no pun intended), climbing both gospel and R&B Billboard charts. She’s been making the festival rounds, sharing stages with Ben Harper, the Avett Brothers, and more, and this December she’ll be supporting the legendary Blind Boys of Alabama on tour. While tonight’s show will be Vice’s last in Portland before she moves to New York, it’s fair to say there is still a whole lot more to come from Liz Vice, God willing. SANTI ELIJAH HOLLEY

DISCHARGE, EYEHATEGOD, TOXIC HOLOCAUST, BLOOD FREAK
(Dante’s, 350 W Burnside) It’s been more than three decades since Discharge literally put the “D” in d-beat. That rapid-fire beat has proven an enduring brand of blasting, even if its corresponding crust-punk offshoot of hardcore has sometimes felt a little limited. Still, there’s been no shortage of badass bands that have made the most out of that formula—Anti Cimex, Mob 47, Disfear, Doom—and we have Discharge to thank for that. The rest of tonight’s lineup is equally killer: At the bottom of the bill are speed/thrash metal mainstays Toxic Holocaust, and sludge-metal icons Eyehategod will have Lamb of God vocalist Randy Blythe filling in for the ill Mike IX Williams. MATTHEW W. SULLIVAN

ROCKY VOTOLATO, CHRIS STAPLES, MICHAEL DEAN DAMRON
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Back in 2006, you could catch me wearing too much eyeliner and thrashing my limbs around at hardcore shows. So when I saw Rocky Votolato’s name on a record I picked it up immediately, imagining the output would be similar to that of his sibling, Cody Votolato (the Blood Brothers, Head Wound City). I couldn’t have been more wrong, but I gave the bare bones alt-country record a chance, though it is more “staring pensively out windows” than “limb thrashing.” Now Votolato’s celebrating 10 years since the release of Makers, and a decade of relentless touring behind him. JENNA FLETCHER

OKKERVIL RIVER, LANDLADY
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) “I’m not as interested in rock ’n’ roll as I used to be,” Okkervil River’s lead singer and songwriter Will Sheff recently told NPR. That statement becomes pretty clear listening to Away, the Austin band’s contemplative eighth album. With roots in Americana and folk, Okkervil has never really had the reputation of a raging rock band, but they’ve definitely explored fist-pumping territory on past LPs like 2007’s The Stage Names and 2013’s The Silver Gymnasium. The circumstances that led to Away—such as Sheff losing his grandfather, and most of his bandmates departing to pursue other interests—may help explain the subdued vibe. Still, longtime listeners will find much to love in the new album, as Sheff’s gift for literary lyricism continues to illuminate the winding paths of his songwriting. KEVIN W. SMITH

SATURDAY 10/8

WIDMER BROTHERS OKTOBERFEST: X AMBASSADORS, THE LONESOME BILLIES, FOREIGN TALKS, TANGO ALPHA TANGO, QUIET TYPE
(Pioneer Courthouse Square, 701 SW 6th) Follow the sound of flugelhorns! The annual Oktoberfest blowout in Munich has been over for a while, but your frolicsome, malty revelry begins now. The Widmers’ 12th-annual go at the celebration is Schuhplattlering its way into Pioneer Courthouse Square for one sudsy day, indeed. DIRK VANDERHART

A TRIBUTE TO TEDDY PENDERGRASS: ANDY STOKES
(Jimmy Mak’s, 221 NW 10th) Portland soul singer Andy Stokes will do justice to Teddy Pendergrass, performing songs like "Love TKO" and "Close the Door" by the legendary Philadelphia soul singer who oozed pure sex in the 1970s and ‘80s. It's well worth checking out Stokes when he sings anything, and even more so when he's belting out Pendergrass tunes on a Saturday night—it's the perfect date night event. 

LOSE YR MIND FEST: SHANNON AND THE CLAMS, MOMMY LONG LEGS, MÁSCARAS, MOON BY YOU
(AudioCinema, 226 SE Madison) They say the seven-year itch marks the decline of happiness in relationships, but fizzy surf rock gang Shannon and the Clams are still all smiles. The Oakland quartet’s sound has naturally progressed over the years, shying away from the sweaty party notes of earlier days and transitioning to softer retro-pop sounds. Shannon Shaw continues to transfix audiences with bellowing vocals perfectly juxtaposed against Cody Blanchard’s syrupy harmonies. With Nate Mayhem on drums and the addition of Will Sprott on keys, tracks from their latest Hardly Art release, Gone by the Dawn, ooze spookiness straight out of a giallo horror film. They’re joined by a slew of equally excellent garage groups at the weekend-long festival, so prepare for a night of gulping tiki drinks. EMILLY PRADO

SHONEN KNIFE, LKN, THE SUICIDE NOTES
(Dante’s, 350 W Burnside) It’s crazy to think that Shonen Knife has been rocking their all-female, pop-punk trio steez for literally longer than I’ve been alive. They’re eternally young robot women that sound like a high-energy, high-pitched Ramones. Founded in 1981 by sisters Naoko and Atsuko Yamano, Shonen Knife have dropped a record every two or three years, amassing a huge catalog of music about feeling snacky and staying positive. They’re geniuses of the simple, catchy rock hook. Atsuko officially retired from the band in 2006 (they’re in their 50s!), but frequently plays bass on the band’s North America tours. That means that if you see them on this tour, you’ll see at least two of the three founding members. SUZETTE SMITH

MICHAEL HURLEY, PONY HUNT, BALLINGER
(Turn! Turn! Turn!, 8 NE Killingsworth) Obscure though he may be, Oregon songwriter Michael Hurley is a legend as storied as the characters that populate the folksy universe of his music and visual art. Since making his first record, First Songs, in 1964, Hurley has lived his music—zigzagging the States and working odd jobs in odd places. Since then, his alter-ego, a mischievous wolf named Snock, has robbed banks, fallen in love with drunks, been drunk, attended the hoodoo bash, and so much more. And yet Hurley and his music are humble rather than boastful—on “Slurf Song,” when he finds a wishbone, his only wish is for a potato. This sweetness shines through amply in his live performances; during mid-set tuning banter I once heard him ask the audience if anyone could bring him a puppy dog. The man is a treasure of American music. SAM BOVARNICK

TOBACCO, HIGH TIDES, ODONIS ODONIS
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Name a musician who has established a more immediately identifiable sound in the past couple of decades than Tobacco. It’s not easy to do! The guy came creepy-crawling out of the Pennsylvania woods in the early ’00s with Black Moth Super Rainbow, a collective of analog synth-obsessed weirdos who spun a particularly psychedelic brand of electro-pop. In recent years, Tobacco has put more effort into his solo albums, which generally sound like Black Moth with sturdier beats. This brings us to Sweatbox Dynasty, Tobacco’s latest effort, which finds him getting back to basics by recording tracks on a cassette deck. As a result, his songs are hazier and hissier than ever before. The low-end digs deeper into the digital mud, the vocals are smeared in syrup, and the synths stretch to the horizon. Sweatbox Dynasty is relentlessly disorienting—which Tobacco would consider a high compliment, no doubt. BEN SALMON

SUNDAY 10/9

THE JULIE RUIN, MECCA NORMAL, ALLISON CRUTCHFIELD AND THE FIZZ
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) When I was 15, I would listen to Mecca Normal’s “I Walk Alone” every day as I maneuvered the desolate and lonely 10 blocks between the bus stop and my house. This was the year I began to learn the intricacies of girlhood, soundtracked by riot grrrl bands, fresh to my previously pop-occupied ears. Jean Smith’s politicized lyrics and occasionally grating singing style created alluring discomfort—Mecca Normal empowered girls to be angry and critical. Their refusal to assimilate or soften their message makes them a truly foundational feminist punk group, and one whose voice is still desperately needed. MORGAN TROPER Also read our story on the Julie Ruin

RYLEY WALKER, CIRCUIT DES YEUX
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Read our story on Ryley Walker.

MONDAY 10/10

EX-CULT, POWER, PUBLIC EYE
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Memphis punks Ex-Cult invoke the kind of furiously paced hardcore that sent scores of adolescents to American Legion halls, Quonset huts, and basements across the country in the early-’80s and beyond. On the strength of that homage, the band’s third full-length record, Negative Growth, travels in jagged lines across a panorama of American hardcore, with ultra-fuzzy patinas at manic paces, likely thanks to the ever-watchful production of Ty Segall. “Attention Ritual” sounds like it was recorded inside a can of Folgers, but retains its energy in fiery waves of skuzz, kooky hooks, and feigned British accents. “Let You In” dispenses with fucking around, instead leading a punishing charge of liberating yowls and buzzsaw riffs. RYAN J. PRADO

GOJIRA, TESSERACT
(Roseland, 10 NW 6th) For nearly two decades Gojira has been putting out some of the most compelling death metal around, taking cues from classic technical thrash outfits like Sepultura and the groove and chug of Pantera. The French metal quartet’s trajectory has been slow and steady, and all indications show they’re in it for the long haul. Case in point is Gojira’s latest album, Magma, their most accessible to date and one that easily draws comparisons to Metallica’s Black Album, for better or for worse. Luckily the band hasn’t abandoned their studious technical prowess—they’ve just added more sticky melodies. If that’s reason for some to cry “sellout,” it just proves that those people aren’t really listening. MARK LORE

TUESDAY 10/11

SURVIVE, MAJEURE
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Austin, Texas band SURVIVE has been making shadowy, eerie soundscapes since 2008. Working on analog synthesizers, their warm, pulsating synth lines and moody ambience are crafted with chugging minimalism and are reminiscent of John Carpenter’s soundtracks or krautrock legends Tangerine Dream. With releases on Mannequin Records, Living Tapes, and most recently revered metal label Relapse Records, the quartet is known for live performances featuring stacks of hardware and a custom light and fog show. Oh, and members Kyle Dixon and Michael Stein are the duo behind the Billboard-topping, nostalgia-inducing score for the Netflix sensation Stranger Things (which recently received the high compliment of being covered by Tangerine Dream themselves). DANIELA SERNA

VÄNLADE, SEAX, HESSIAN, EXCRUICIATOR, DJ GUILLOTINE
(Black Water Bar, 835 NE Broadway) If one ever needed proof that there’s still quality heavy metal coming from various corners of the US, this bill would provide it. Vänlade, Seax, and Hessian hail from Kansas, Massachusetts, and Maine, respectively. Hessian’s Bachelor of Black Arts record is an aptly named slab of mid-tempo, darkly veiled, heavy metal rock ’n’ roll akin to the new wave of British heavy metal sound. It’s full of dual guitar tastiness and fist-clenching riffage. Seax wear their metal style on their denim and leather sleeves with a discography that features song titles like “High on Metal,” “Speed Forever,” “Forged by Metal,” and “Speed Psycho.” It’s no stretch to assume you’re in store for some tight, well-executed speed metal lunacy when they mount the stage. Vänlade’s galloping, soaring power metal is characterized by epic, orchestral guitar work and vocalist Brett Blackout Scott’s wailing falsetto belts lyrics that would make Manowar’s muscles ripple. They’ll have you ready and frothing for battle against all non-believers. ARIS HUNTER WALES