KARMA RIVERA Thurs 11/3 Kelly’s Olympian Jay Murgas

WEDNESDAY 11/2

NICOLAS JAAR
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Thanks to a string of daring and danceable remixes, edits, and EPs, Nicolas Jaar was already well known in the world of electronic music by age 18. But it was the Chilean American producer’s debut full-length—2011’s Space Is Only Noise—that established him as a rising superstar proficient in both club bangers and ambitious composition. Jaar’s recent follow-up, Sirens, is murky, melodic, and unnervingly intimate, with as much attention paid to the space between sounds as the sounds themselves. A taut post-punk vibe courses throughout Sirens—clanks and clunks sit next to slippery bass lines, while distorted synths bob and weave within staticky silence. Jaar is a master of atmosphere, the kind of restless creative who couldn’t stop pushing and pulling on the boundaries of electronic music if he tried. BEN SALMON

YOUTHHOOD: ANNA VO, WINE + COFFEE, DJ LAMAR LEROY, SARAH BRAHIM, A’MISA CHIU, HUIXOLA, MIA O’CONNOR, MELIKA BELHAJ, SOLEIL HO
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) What does it mean to hold space as an artist of color in Portland? Youthhood seeks to answer this question while exploring themes of home, migration, and self-recognition through music, spoken word, and dance performances. This collaborative event is hosted by curator Stacey Tran of Holding Space, an exhibit for multidisciplinary artists of color, and Natalie Figueroa, organizer of the all-inclusive community dance party YGB. Youthhood’s lineup showcases Portland artists, including Wine + Coffee (the project between Ripley Snell and Old Grape God), YGB’s resident DJ Lamar LeRoy, IntersectFest organizer A’misa Chiu, Mia O’Connor of DUG, and more. JENÉ ETHERIDGE

THURSDAY 11/3

THE THESIS: KARMA RIVERA, I$$A, DMARX, VERBZ
(Kelly’s Olympian, 426 SW Washington) Forget the Pearl District art snobbery. For nearly two years, Portland’s best bet on the first Thursday of the month has been the Thesis, the intensely local hip-hop showcase at Kelly’s Olympian. November’s lineup, headlined by shit-kicking Portland emcee Karma Rivera is especially on point. DIRK VANDERHART

FRIENDS & FRIENDS OF FRIENDS 9 COMPILATION RELEASE PARTY: MO TROPER, CAT HOCH, SLOW CORPSE, ASTRO TAN, GLASYS, NO ALOHA
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Since 2007, Tender Loving Empire has painstakingly documented the talents of Portland’s vibrantly creative residents, particularly with their annual Friends & Friends of Friends compilation. The label’s ninth comp features 39 songs by local artists, from Mo Troper’s catchy power pop to Cat Hoch’s haze-gaze to the trippy R&B of Astro Tan. You can pick up a copy at its family reunion-style release show—all proceeds from the sale of CDs at the party will benefit the nonprofit crisis line Call to Safety. CERVANTE POPE

FRIDAY 11/4

THE HEAD AND THE HEART, DECLAN McKENNA
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) Real talk: My only goal in life is to die a less mediocre white lady than the one I was born. That intersectionality-heavy goal becomes more like a blaring neon air horn when this life reminds me that bands like the Head and the Heart somehow still exist. Now, there’s nothing inherently wrong with enjoying a little earnest faux-folk as a soundtrack to your day. But when the faux-folk all-white (natch) band in question uses instrumental practices first perfected by black sharecroppers more than a century ago, and interprets tradition as a tone-deaf gull echo of lyrics like “I wish I was a slave to an age-old trade,” later naming the single from its soulless third album, Signs of Light, “Rhythm & Blues”? Woof, y’all. Again, nothing against indie folk-pop or rehashed roots music—I have plenty more (and much better) longhaired Americana artists to send your way. Just don’t give your money to this one. KIM SELLING

BILL FRISELL
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) Guitarist Bill Frisell’s kaleidoscope of jazz and folk can be bright as day or as dark and uneasy as 3 am in a cemetery. His ability to send melodies darting off in countless directions has made him a commodity for composer John Zorn and doom/drone metal band Earth, but his three-decade career has also yielded some fantastic solo work. He’s covered and interpreted the work of artists like John Lennon, Thelonious Monk, and Hank Williams (he even made an album dedicated to reinterpreting TV and movie themes), delivering often haunting takes on the originals. Frisell’s versatility is no doubt a large part of the equation, but his unique style remains intact wherever he ventures. MARK LORE

SATURDAY 11/5

OREGON SYMPHONY: BEETHOVEN’S PASTORAL SYMPHONY

(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) Think of Beethoven, and you probably think of that glowering visage, those tumultuous chords, those many-spired orchestral monuments to angst and melancholy. But ol’ Ludwig Van always let in a bit more light than most people give him credit for, and his sixth symphony, the so-called “Pastoral,” is among his gentlest, warmest creations. Its five interconnected movements depict an easy stroll through a bucolic countryside, and its jaunty main theme is bursting with carefree joy. The music goes on to encounter a meandering stream, a clumsy village dance, and a brief but deafening thunderstorm before its finale of gratitude and resolution. Considered by some to be the most lightweight of Beethoven’s major symphonies, the sixth is nevertheless a work of exquisite beauty and depth, and a demonstration of unparalleled musicality—this Beethoven guy really knew how to stitch a few notes together. Tonight the Oregon Symphony, with guest conductor Hans Graf, tackles the masterpiece, along with an orchestral work by crazy old Bob Schumann and a rarely heard wind concerto by Swiss/Dutch composer Frank Martin, a piece the Symphony hasn’t performed since 1959. NED LANNAMANN

ALICE BAG, HURRY UP, SEX CRIME, MACHO BOYS
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) Legendary Latina musician, artist, and author Alice Bag got her start fronting the Bags, one of LA’s first punk bands. She’s done a whole lot throughout her 40-year career, but this past June brought the release of her self-titled solo debut—11 tracks that soulfully blend punk, doo-wop, glam, and traditional ranchera. CIARA DOLAN Read our story on Alice Bag

GENDERS, MÁSCARAS, LAURA PALMER’S DEATH PARADE
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) If Portland had a house band, it’d probably be Genders. The four-piece plays around town all the time, tours nonstop (with Built to Spill, no less), and cranks out new music like a goddamn machine—most recently an EP called Phone Home that they’re celebrating tonight. Its five songs are catchy, riding the line between hazy guitar-rock and sunshiny Coke-commercial pop like they’re on autopilot. They’ve mastered a sound that’s sweet and mild, with a foundation built on honeyed harmonies and layers of reverb-heavy guitar. It sounds great; I can’t say I dislike any Genders song. But on Phone Home, the band stays in the same lane they’ve been in since forming four years ago, and I can’t help but wish they’d pull the rug out from under themselves and try something wild. A few months ago I saw them do a blistering cover of a Sheryl Crow song at Mississippi Studios, and it was delivered with the kind of gory emotional rawness that subverts predictability. This EP is another link in Genders’ daisy chain of solid releases, but here’s hoping they’ll weave in something thorny soon. CIARA DOLAN

SUNDAY 11/6

OREGON SYMPHONY: BEETHOVEN’S PASTORAL SYMPHONY

(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) See Saturday’s listing.

A$AP FERG, PLAYBOI CARTI, ROB $TONE
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) A$AP Ferg’s father made a living creating custom apparel for the likes of Bell Biv DeVoe and P-Diddy, so it’s easy to understand the Harlem rapper’s career trajectory. On his latest album, Always Strive and Prosper, Ferg calls upon the genre’s greats (Missy Elliott, Migos, Chuck D, and more) to illustrate a narrative that’s laced with nostalgia and references to rap’s yesteryear. He shares stories about home and family without losing his signature edge (“Hungry Ham,” an ode to his neighborhood, is a banger in the truest sense of the word), and raps about navigating the lifestyles of the rich and famous. The A$AP Mob oozes coolness, so it’s nice to hear a member of the hip-hop collective reminding us that he’s just a normal guy who used to work day jobs before he started donning Alexander Wang and meticulously curating his Instagram account. EMMA BURKE

LUBEC, ALIEN BOY, HELENS, FLOATING ROOM
(Lola’s Room at the Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) When it comes to emo music, I have very particular taste: I want SoCal-accented vocals that aren’t too whiney, lyrics about scorned ex-lovers that aren’t too corny, guitars that thrash but also make me want to weep, and a perfect mix of humor and sincerity. Alien Boy fulfills all of these very specific qualifications as a rock group tailor-made for the current pop-punk climate. The Portland band’s new EP Stay Alive rounds out their sound without losing the catchiness required for impassioned sing-alongs. Its members clearly draw inspiration from other bands they admire, like the Smiths, Joyce Manor, and Wipers. But Alien Boy doesn’t sound derivative—instead traces of these influences show up in their songs like indirect love letters. EMMA BURKE

PWR BTTM, BELLOWS, LISA PRANK
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) While most of Oliver Kalb’s music released under the moniker Bellows conjures the acoustic intimacy of Elliott Smith or Sufjan Stevens, “Orange Juice” (from his September release Fist & Palm) is a game-changer—here the Brooklyn musician/producer sings through heavily auto-tuned vocals over electronic backbeats. “Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter” resonates with Aaron Cop- land-esque grandeur, and “A Sordid Ending” cuts loose over aggressive guitars and percussion as Kalb recalls hot-blooded encounters with an emotionally unhinged father figure. On her debut full-length, Adult Teen, Robin Edwards of Lisa Prank captures the biting wisdom of adolescence, especially on songs like “Luv Is Dumb.” WILLIAM KENNEDY

MONDAY 11/7

OREGON SYMPHONY: BEETHOVEN’S PASTORAL SYMPHONY

(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) See Saturday’s listing.

JOHN MAYALL
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) England always had more respect for American blues than its own homeland ever did, and John Mayall is the patron saint of the British branch of the blues. Or he would be, if he ever died; now at 82 years old, Mayall is still chuffin’ and grindin’ and steamin’ over those same 12-bar progressions. His band Bluesbreakers was an incubator for legions of British rock stars that rose to prominence during the ’60s and ’70s. Without him we wouldn’t have had Fleetwood Mac, Cream, or Mick Taylor-era Rolling Stones. That Mayall is still devoted to those electrified one-four-five chord progressions of American blues pioneers like Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf—Mayall’s latest album Find a Way to Care sounds very much like all his other albums—is something to be celebrated. NL

MAMA, THE RUBS, LADYWOLF, MOONDRAKE
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) MAMA’s official press photo looks like it was taken 40 years ago—it’s faded and grainy, featuring four dudes, some feathered hair, lots of denim, and Thin Lizzy and T. Rex T-shirts. This all makes perfect sense given MAMA’s musical output, which draws heavily from the power pop and hard rock of the ’70s and ’80s. Get in, crank out some killer riffs and sweet melodies, and get out before the clock hits 180 seconds. That’s MAMA’s thing, and they’re darn good at it. The band is on a big ol’ tour with fellow Windy City rockers the Rubs, who are a little more Elvis Costello and a little less Cheap Trick. BEN SALMON

BOZ SCAGGS
(Revolution Hall, 1300 SE Stark) Like mushrooms after rain, vinyl copies of Boz Scaggs’ Silk Degrees tend to sprout up overnight in people’s record collections. “Jeez, I don’t remember buying this,” every record collector has said at one time or another, suspiciously eyeing the iconic album cover with Scaggs on a park bench looking either drunk or dejected as a manicured lady hand suggestively reaches into frame. The former Steve Miller Band guitarist’s blockbuster 1976 album is a swankfest from bygone days, a surprisingly ambidextrous collision of string-laden R&B, gently discofied beats, singer/songwriter introspection, and Springsteen-esque bar-band bravado. And its two hit singles couldn’t be more different: “Lowdown” was, probably, sexy for its time, with its Barry White groove and burning-cool jazz flute; nowadays it sounds immeasurably creepy. But “Lido Shuffle” has a McCartney-worthy melody, a Thin Lizzy quick-shuffle rock beat, and the soaring sing-along chorus of your karaoke dreams. Scaggs has apparently recorded dozens of other albums that you’ve never heard, and presumably he’ll play songs from some of them tonight, but expect those Silk Degrees jams to be the meat of the set list. NL

TUESDAY 11/8

TORY LANEZ, JACQUEES, KRANIUM, DJ VEECEE
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) Add yet another Canadian hip-hop/R&B sensation to the list: 24-year-old Tory Lanez, whose lead single, “Say It” has helped hoist him into the national spotlight. Plenty of cosigns later, his debut studio album I Told You was released in August. It’s a “swavey” mix of moody knocks like “Flex,” “To D.R.E.A.M.,” and dancehall tracks like “Luv.” Lanez also has some associations locally: Portland rapper-singer ISSA recruited him to be featured on “Sleep On You,” another dancehall jam that’ll make you want to move those hips. JENNI MOORE