TANK AND THE BANGAS
Sun 10/1 Star Theater

SUPER PICK

TANK AND THE BANGAS, SWEET CRUDE
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) At Pickathon in August I was blessed with the opportunity to see New Orleans’ Tank and the Bangas, whose exciting and dynamic sound knows no bounds. They’re masters of funk, jazz, R&B, and soul, but often allow their music to explore elements of rock, folk, gospel, and hip-hop via spoken word. The group’s pint-sized, big-haired frontwoman is Tarriona “Tank” Ball, a highly skilled powerhouse singer who doubles as a slam poet and often surprises even herself with the sounds that come out of her mouth. With backing vocals by Anjelika “Jelly” Joseph, the pair have mad chemistry as they lead the group’s well-oiled machine alongside flautist Albert Allenback, drummer Joshua Johnson, keyboardist/bassist Norman Spence, and keyboardist Merell Burkett. Onstage the group fuses for a quirky, New Orleans-flavored jam session that, if I had my way, would go on forever. This year Tank and the Bangas won NPR’s Tiny Desk Contest, signaling their rise to mainstream stardom. Just watch videos and performances of songs like “Quick,” “Rollercoasters,” and “The Rhythm of Life” if you don’t believe me. After seeing Tank and the Bangas’ invigorating live set turn a lawn full of Portlanders into a jumping, clapping, sweaty dance party, I knew I’d be snatching up every chance to see them again. JENNI MOORE


WEDNESDAY 9/27

SOUND + VISION: DAN DAN, WET FRUIT
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) This edition of the Mercury’s monthly concert series Sound + Vision features Dan Dan, an analog synth and drum three-piece that specializes in pulsing beats and kaleidoscopic melodies that could soundtrack an interstellar voyage to an alien planet. As always, this Sound + Vision show is completely free—don’t forget to tip your bartender! CIARA DOLAN

SHEER MAG, TENEMENT
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) See All-Ages Action!

TEARS OF SILVER
(ArtHaus PDX Chapel Theater, 850 NE 81st) As the music industry continues its slow crumble into disarray, bands are forced to employ new means to capture the attention of new listeners and longtime fans. For Tears of Silver, the membership of the band alone is enough to raise some eyebrows: Leading the charge are Jonathan Donahue and Grasshopper, two founding members of Mercury Rev, and their pal Ken Stringfellow of the Posies. But to add some fuel to speculation of this supergroup’s power, they’re setting off on a tour made up of popup shows. You buy a ticket, and they’ll let you know 24 hours in advance where the show’s being held. Even on a more traditional tour, the draw of this band’s music would be enough to pull you in—they concoct a perfectly dreamy sound that takes full advantage of the tight vocal harmonies of Stringfellow and Donahue and their love of warm ’70s pop. ROBERT HAM


THURSDAY 9/28

STURGILL SIMPSON
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) This is the concert I’ve been most looking forward to since I moved to Portland—this 39-year-old progressive southern country singer/songwriter is just awesome. Check out his last two albums: Metamodern Sounds in Country Music (“Turtles All the Way Down” is one of the best modern country songs, and his cover of British new wave song “The Promise” is so good), and last year’s A Sailor’s Guide to Earth, which won a Grammy for best country album. DOUG BROWN

FRANKIE ROSE
9/28 DOUG FIR Erez Avissar

FRANKIE ROSE, SUBURBAN LIVING, A CERTAIN SMILE
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) After moving back and forth between her hometown of Los Angeles and the indie-pop epicenter of Brooklyn, Frankie Rose unveiled a follow-up to 2013’s Herein Wild with August’s Cage Tropical. The former Vivian Girls and Dum Dum Girls drummer starts off her latest solo release with “Love in Rockets,” featuring lush guitar riffs, sparse drums, twinkly keyboards, and the very nu-goth opening line “I’m done resting my head like a wilting flower.” Rose makes every sound count, with delicate piano melodies meshing perfectly with robotic drum machine beats. Cage Tropical is a step forward, and though it’s ambitious to blend new-wave production with indie-pop, the album does so while ultimately remaining fun. CAMERON CROWELL


FRIDAY 9/29

STURGILL SIMPSON
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) See Thursday's preview.

MOSES SUMNEY,ANGELO DE AUGUSTINE
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Singer/songwriter Moses Sumney’s voice is soulful and very strange. He’s got a superhuman falsetto that swells and soars over a luminous electro-folk melody on the 2016 single “Lonely World” (which features Thundercat on bass), one of the most spellbinding pieces of music I’ve ever heard. Sumney just released his debut LP, Aromanciticsm, last week, but he’s already got fans in artists like Solange and Sufjan Stevens. Prepare to flood your ears with some heavenly new material. CIARA DOLAN

JANET JACKSON
(Moda Center, 1 N Center Court) It’s been two years since Janet Jackson released her 11th studio album, Unbreakable, and after several false starts to the supporting tour—thanks to an undisclosed illness and her pregnancy—tonight Jackson will finally (hopefully) touch down at the Moda Center. It’s tough to under-hype the cultural impact that the youngest of the Jackson children has had since she set out on her own; her storied collaborative work with Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis is the kind of creative marriage that produced pop superstardom. The formerly dubbed “Unbreakable Tour” has morphed into the “State of the World” tour, and the set list is purportedly more geared toward the socially conscious tunes of her catalog that respond to xenophobia, fascism, racism, and white supremacy with an unabashed “fuck you.” RYAN J. PRADO

MELT: EVAC, BEN MILSTEIN, KRIS NORTHERN, PROQXIS, MR. PROJECTILE
(Boiler Lounge at the Bit House Saloon, 727 SE Grand) In the vast world of electronic music, much of what you’ll hear on the radio is canned, watered-down, and thriving off pure hype. But there’s a growing faction of musicians dedicated to fighting such mediocrity, and you can find them at the heart of the underground scene. Melt—a new IDM experimental dance music night in Portland—features artists who are focused on a different side of the genre. EVAC is a sound designer and experimental breakbeat composer whose work has seen success on labels like Touchin’ Bass, Addictech, and Muti Music. Trying to compare his work to commercial EDM is like comparing an awesome interactive MOMA exhibit to a bad fruit painting. CHRISTINA BROUSSARD

THE DREAM SYNDICATE, EYELIDS
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) Quick history lesson: The Paisley Underground was a vibrant music scene that bubbled up across California in the late ’70s and ’80s, eventually coalescing in Los Angeles. These bands played jangle-pop with the spirit of punk, the sprawl of psychedelic rock, and a hint of twang here and there. The Bangles were the scene’s breakout stars, and bands like Green on Red and Rain Parade made great records, but the best of the bunch was the Dream Syndicate, led by a guy named Steve Wynn. They made a classic album (The Days of Wine and Roses) in 1982, followed it up with three more over six years, and then broke up. But they reformed in 2012 and now are releasing How Did I Find Myself Here?, their first record in nearly three decades. Good news: It’s a lovely, lived-in blend of cool Velvets vocals, six-string shredding, and gnarled urgency. It sounds like rock ’n’ roll made by folks who know what they’re doing. BEN SALMON


SATURDAY 9/30

JACKPOT RECORDS’ 20TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY AND RECORD SALE: KYLE CRAFT, THE SHIVAS, RYAN SOLLEE
(Eagles Lodge F.O.E. #3256, 4904 SE Hawthorne) The year 1997 might not have been the most auspicious time to open a record store—vinyl was in a slump, downloads were just around the corner, and all the big players like Tower Records would be gone in a few short years. But Isaac Slusarenko’s independent music shop, Jackpot Records, has stuck it out for 20 long years and become not just one of the finest record stores in town, it’s become a hub of local music, expanding their purview to live performances, special releases on their own label, and even film events. Jackpot’s pulling out all the stops for their 20th anniversary celebration, kicking things off with a giant record sale with more than 10,000 used slabs of wax for sale, and there will be a ton of giveaways throughout the day, too, with swag from the Criterion Collection, Audio-Technica, and more. Finally, there’s a live show with a stacked bill of local luminaries, including the Shivas, the Builders and the Butchers’ Ryan Sollee, and Kyle Craft. And the whole thing’s a benefit for Planned Parenthood, so this is pretty much the greatest possible way to show your gratitude for an excellent shop that’s become a local institution over the past 20 years. NED LANNAMANN

10TH LETTER, STRATEGY
(Bit House Saloon, 727 SE Grand) Read our story on 10th Letter.

MONTHS, THE WILD BODY, MUJAHEDEEN
(The Know, 3728 NE Sandy) Read our review of Months’ new record, Black Hats for War.

KACY AND CLAYTON, THE PARSON RED HEADS
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Kacy and Clayton’s Bandcamp profile lists the folk duo’s hometown as Glentworth, Saskatchewan, and Wikipedia lists Glentworth’s population as “52 people 75 cats 37 dogs and 3 horses.” Now, you can’t believe everything you read on the internet, but the point is this: There’s a reason the music of Kacy Anderson and Clayton Linthicum sounds like it’s from another time. The second cousins grew up far from record stores or radio, so they picked up influences like Doc Watson, the Carter Family, and Bob Wills on long drives with their grandpa/grand-uncle and his cassette tapes. They experimented with instruments, played live for residents of the local elderly home, and scoured the internet for more contemporary artists—a relative term, in this case, for ’60s and ’70s British folkies like Davey Graham and Shirley Collins. The result: Kacy and Clayton’s music is at once traditionally twangy, gently psychedelic, and touched by the blues. Their new album The Siren’s Song is gorgeous through and through. BS

BILL ORCUTT, SIR RICHARD BISHOP
(Turn! Turn! Turn!, 8 NE Killingsworth) Bill Orcutt has, for the past eight years or so, primarily stuck to using acoustic guitar on his various albums and small-batch releases of improvisation, groaning blues, and tortured free jazz. But he’s never been far from the electric guitar he throttled rapturously as a member of the trio Harry Pussy. Still, there’s something bracing and fresh about Orcutt’s approach to the instrument on his most recent album, a self-titled effort released on his own label Palilalia. His mastery of tone is crystalline on this record, sticking as he does to an unprocessed sound free of effects pedals. There’re just the small breaths of reverb surrounding every note as he pulls fractious melodies and a quiet drone that flutters underneath it all like a cushion. And he’s left ample room for us to cuddle up with him. RH


SUNDAY 10/1

TANK AND THE BANGAS, SWEET CRUDE
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) Read our Tank and the Bangas super pick.

VANCE JOY, AMY SHARK, CHAPPELL ROAN
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) See All-Ages Action!

RAKIM, LIBRETTO, JONNY COOL, DJ WICKED
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) We tend to give venerable artists a bit of leeway when it comes to performing in the twilights of their careers. It’s easy to get nostalgic, but we have to remember that as they age, an artist’s vigor fades. That’s why news of MC Rakim’s lackluster performances as of late is disappointing but not surprising. That doesn’t mean every show on this tour will be bad. He’s on the road celebrating the 30th anniversary of Paid in Full, the 1987 debut from him and his rap partner Eric B. They shared a stage in July for the album’s actual birthday, but Rakim’s flying solo for the rest of the tour. Without his comrade and collaborator by his side, Rakim may be a little bit off his game, but not enough for him to stay out of it entirely. He’s teased the prospect of actually releasing some of the more excitable and meaningful material he records at his home studio, so ideally there’ll be a bit more pep in his step if he takes any of it to the stage tonight. CERVANTE POPE


MONDAY 10/2

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, STING! Musician, actor, writer, humanitarian—but to us, he’ll always be the poster child for tantric sex.


TUESDAY 10/3

BILLY BRAGG
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) Songwriter Billy Bragg is a booming-voiced, left-leaning delight, and one of the only singers who has ever sung lyrics penned by American hero Woody Guthrie with the clever reverence they require. Equally influenced by punk and folk, his music is instantly lovable and hyperliterate. It’s really good dad rock—your dad’s a labor organizer, right? MEGAN BURBANK

BLEACHERS, TANGERINE
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) See All-Ages Action!