THURSDAY 6/5

FABOLOUS, SMILEZ & SOUTHSTAR, STAGGA LEE
(Rose Festival Waterfront Park, 6 pm) Fabolous' "Can't Let You Go" is possibly one of the worst singles on commercial rap radio right now, partially because the acoustic guitar line has been heard in over 99 other commercial rap songs (fuck Santana!), and also because Fabolous is phoning it in. He's asking for a mistress cause he's already got a wife, but he sounds like he's mail-ordering a Dustbuster. The production on his other tracks is better thanks to Neptunes, Just Blaze, and Timbaland, and the appearance of the greatest rap crew since Gang Starr, M.O.P.; even still, Fabolous sounds bored as hell. JULIANNE SHEPHERD



ROLLERBALL, SIX FOOT SLOTH,

CREEPY OLD TRUCKS
(Blackbird, 3728 NE Sandy) Creepy Old have come into the '00s with an electronic, sampled (Portishead) sound with vocals that can go from sounding like a female Dave Matthews to that guy from Ministry. Creepy's new dark, gothy sound and heavy use of drum machines make them a Portland band that should not only be applauded for evolving, but for a show worth seeing. KATIE SHIMER



GRAYAREA
(Ohm, 21 NW 1st) Notoriously funky, trancy breakbeat trio gives palpitations with live PA. JS



FRIDAY 6/6

THE CRAMPS, QUINTRON & MISS PUSSYCAT, THE MILLIONAIRES
(Crystal, 1332 W Burnside) Quintron is an electro-noise freak whose music-related escapades are just as interesting as the unusual records themselves. His Drum Buddy Demonstration record was a campy explanation of how to play his self-made Drum Buddy, a contraption he still uses that converts light into analog rhythm patterns (this, after allegedly having created drum machines that could run on spit or that shot out light patterns based on sound). On his less interesting Organ Solo, the music that comes out is James Brown as interpreted by an acid freak, as background babbling bumps and grinds against lo-fi organ-thumping funk. JENNIFER MAERZ



DISCO BREAKIN' STARRING DJS MAXIM BASA, ROB UPTIGHT, BREAKERS MOON PATROL AND MISSILEFIST CREW
(Nocturnal, 1800 E Burnside) Rob Uptight and Maxim Basa take it beyond James Brown, spinning obscure and familiar disco breaks for your b-boying pleasure. The prospect of practicing your freezes becomes slightly more intimidating when you learn you'll be in the presence of the Moon Patrol and Missilefist, two of Portland's emergent young breakdance crews. Four days on, I'm still nursing torn muscles from my first breaking class, so I think I'll just watch. JS



DAMIEN JURADO, ADAM VOITH,

ROCKY VOTOLATO
(Blackbird) Damien Jurado's most recent album, Where Shall You Take Me?, is one layered acoustic gem after another, all of which move at their own meandering pace. It's not for everyone--ADD sufferers need not bother--but for those who apply to effort, their reward is one of the finer records of Jurado's criminally underrated career. Adam Voith is not only a better writer than myself, but he is also taking the stage tonight to do a reading in support of his new novel, Stand Up, Ernie Baxter: You're Dead. Rocky Votolato opens the show with subtle emotional acoustic songs--none of which contain the faux-misery and creepiness of Dashboard Confessional, who Votolato often tours with. CARMELO MARTINEZ



ZEKE, CAMAROSMITH, fireballs of freedom, flashlight brown
(Dante's, 1 SW 3rd) Zeke is a band from our neighbor city, Seattle. They play rock and roll sped up to breakneck speed. I had heard they broke up but maybe that wasn't true, or they have worked out all their differences to make a tour happen. I know all their fans are happy anyway. Do you think they broke up because of an inter-band love triangle, or just some silly little spat about who ate the last Eggo waffle? I really hope it was the love triangle that caused the split, because that is just the kind of shit I like to hear. Truly scandalous. CHRIS REED



SATURDAY 6/7

RAHZEL, DJ-JS1
(B Complex, 320 SE 2nd, 9 pm, $22) The Roots haven't been the same since they lost Rahzel. (In fact, now they pretty much suck, but that's another story.) He's the quintessential beatboxer with a mouth of flubber, and through his formidable talents, Rahzel can make virtually any sound known to man--and some man has never even dreamed of. I saw him about three years ago; it was such a whirlwind, all I remember about the performance is the part where I female ejaculated. DJ-JS1 of Rock Steady Crew accompanies. JS



HANDMADE BAZAAR: ROY TINSEL,

THE CULOTTES, YARL CORBIE
(Mallory House, 5732 NE Mallory, 11 pm) The Handmade Bazaar, in its third year, returns to remind us exactly how localized our economy can be if we let it: Portlanders make their own soda, bound journals, clothing, etc., and sell it all from tables in the yard of the Mallory House. Lunch will be served for a nominal fee; Roy Tinsel and Yarl Corbie play country, along with contemplative pop of The Culottes, who now include a second guitarist and a cello player. JS



IMMOLATION, GRAVE, GOATWHORE,

CREMATORIUM
(Meow Meow, 527 SE Pine) It's taken more than a decade, but the members of Immolation have officially become history's leading authors of anti-Christian screeds, musical division. They've tweaked bumper-sticker slogans ("No Jesus, No Beast") and anachronistic rural phrases ("Stench of High Heaven"), all in the name of providing fans with tunes that are as sacri-licious as a chocolate-iced communion wafer. Still, headbangers cannot live on blasphemy alone, so Immolation considerately provide scorched-larynx vocals and percussion that throbs like a fatally arrhythmic heartbeat. Openers Goatwhore, a refreshing voice on the Satanic circuit, aren't so much anti-God as they are pro-Baphomet; arrive early to witness their heartwarming pledges of devotion to this under-appreciated devil figure. ANDREW MILLER



FRUIT BATS, TRIANGLE, PSEUDO SIX
(Blackbird) The Fruit Bats are a couple of cute little numbers from Chicago, Eric Johnson and Gillian Lisee, who play cute little numbers loaded with pretty horns and chimes and various keyed instruments. I could have sworn I even heard a flute or two on their latest album, Mouthfuls. They have a nice, rich sound, making songs as they should be made: with simple writing and complicated layering. That's how you get something both accessible and long lasting. You can't put up Christmas lights until you have a sturdy house to hang 'em from. JWS



RD, DJ BROKEN WINDOW, MAXIM BASA
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Brokenbeat/electro producer/DJ RD comes from Los Angeles' Experimental Liquor Museum, a label specializing mostly in the more adventurous realms of electro. DJs Brokenwindow and Maxim Basa make Portland just a little more cosmopolitan. Dear Holocene, I am in love with you. JS



THE DEATH CAMPAIGN, AS I LAY DYING,

THEE LETTING FORTH OF FIRE, ELINAI
(Solid State, 7th & E Burnside) As much as I love the total wave of DIY bliss I get when entering Solid State, I can't help but be freaked out by how much of a Christian sausage party it is. That's the problem with Hardcore, especially the Christian Hardcore scene: girls are nowhere to be seen. The few who attend are either selling merch or holding their boyfriend's hoodies as they finger-point in the front row. Tonight's show probably won't be much different. The Death Campaign are creepy as all hell, but it's not their music that freaks me out. Any band that writes website manifestos that declare that their music "conjures images of spiritual warfare and the symbiotic relationship of The Maker and His Army" is not a band for me, or anyone who doesn't love the big dude upstairs. CM



QUIVAH, LUMINOUS FOG, MADGESDIQ
(Medicine Hat) Some of Portland's homegrown homeboys hit the stage for a night of hippin' and hoppin'. Madgesdiq LOVES that herb. Has anyone said that yet? JWS



BUTTFRENCHERS, JUNIORS GANG,

cootie platoon, THE CHINS
(Twilight, 1420 SE Powell) The name is hilariously juvenile, but believe you this: the Butt Frenchers are as tight as a drum. Okay, maybe not quite THAT tight (yet!), but the Butt Frenchers believe they are that tight, and will make you believe it, too. They have this great little lead singer who wears tight pants and vamps around the stage like a less-splattery Danzig. One instrumentalist wears a tie. They rock hard and fast. There is joy here, so much joy. So many local bands either don't truly love what they are doing, or don't know how to communicate it. This band is not one of them. JWS



SUNDAY 6/8

HANDMADE BAZAAR STARRING DELTA DART, MARISA, THE ONLINE ROMANCE
(Mallory House) More precocious meanderings to accompany the tour de force that is the Handmade Bazaar. JS



thundergasm, GARGANTULA, YOB,

2MEN DEAD
(Ash Street) Do you remember Blast? Well, I don't. But apparently they were one of the best hardcore bands of the '80s and Gargantula revives their singer. They also host ex-members of the band Spaceboy who are described as "death-metal injected mathematical mayhem." So this should be something of a hardcore death-metal meltdown, yo. KS



GRAILS, REEKS & THE WRECKS, GHOST TO FALCO
(Disjecta, 118 NE Russell) Grails is the new name of one of Portland's best bands, Laurel Canyon, so when they release their emotionally immediate, gracefully bombastic instrumental record on Neurot later this summer, you'll know what to look for. JS



MUSIQ, VIVIAN GREEN, dj chill
(Crystal) NBC's bandstand-based '60s drama American Dreams recently cast Vivian Green as Brenda Holloway, an amazingly apt choice from the same show that imagined Third Eye Blind as the Kinks. Green, whose alluringly anguished cover of Holloway's "Every Little Bit Hurts" subsequently scored some commercial airplay, captures both her predecessor's sultry, soulful delivery and relative anonymity. (Dreams usually opts for stars playing much bigger stars--see Usher as Marvin Gaye.) Formerly one of Jill Scott's backup singers, Green made a strong move toward establishing her own legacy with last year's dazzling debut Love Story. AM



MONDAY 6/9

BLACK EYED PEAS, sirens echo, illaj,

the chosen
(Crystal) No sub-genre proclaims its realness as proudly as underground hiphop, so it's a bit puzzling to see one of these beacons of anti-bling activism--a group that even titled a song "Positivity"--hawking Dr. Pepper, slumming on the Warped Tour, and opening for Justin Timberlake. However, Black Eyed Peas has always been more about easy-chant choruses and feel-good fare than backpack cred. It also eschews graphic crime stories, decadent debauchery, and militant political stances. More than any other active rap outfit, this happy-hop trio revels in good, clean funk. AM



DISMEMBERMENT PLAN, ENON, GOLD CHAINS
(Meow Meow) Ten years, a collision with a major label, a loving connection with an indie, a European opening gig for Pearl Jam, and one fan-generated remix album: these are a few of the things Dismemberment Plan leaves behind. Sadly, this is the D.C. band's last tour ever--the last time we'll hear the funky energy of their articulate rock music--the last time we'll hear their diverse pop medleys mixing Outkast with Missy--the final time for that chick who stood behind me at the last show to scream "TRAAAAVIIIIS!" at the top of her lungs after every song, like a caged bird in heat. Yes. After this summer, Dismemberment Plan will make an amicable split. But it's okay. Here's the deal: Drummer Joe Easley and guitarist Jason Caddell want to stop touring and go back to school, while bassist Eric Axelson will continue playing in his new group with the Promise Ring's Davey von Bohlen and Dan Didier, called In English. Meanwhile, Singer/guitarist Travis Morrison has been shuttling between D.C., Seattle, and San Francisco, recording his debut solo record with Chris Walla and John Vanderslice, respectively. JS



LION FEVER, THE CUTS, STARVATIONS
(Blackbird) It's impossible to hear Oakland, California's Cuts and not think you're listening to some old Television tracks, dug up and dusted off three decades later. Frontman Andy Jordan hiccups through his lines like a young Tom Verlaine, playing less the feral rock 'n' roller and more the intellectual pinup. The music is buoyed with plenty of melody, thanks in large part to Dan Aaberg's skilled work on the keyboards and the jingle-jangle rhythm section of Garet Goddard and Carlos Palacios. JM



MATT SHARP, JOSH HAGER, GREG BROWN
(Nocturnal) I don't know how to talk about ex-Weezer bassist Matt Sharp without sounding like I'm completely head over heels in love, so I'm not even gonna try. I've seen him twice already in the past eight months, and I plan on bein' first in line for this show too. Sharp's semisweet, soothing voice is paired with backing harmonies, simple drumming, quiet acoustic guitar, heart-tugging piano, and various other lullaby sounds that are all gentle and warm to send a spaz like me into a deep state of daydreaming. MEGAN SELING



TUESDAY 6/10

JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE, CHRISTINA AGUILERA, BLACK EYED PEAS
(Rose Garden) Elsewhere in this issue, you will find a stirring argument in defense of Christina Aguilera (please see page 20). And although Justin Timberlake needs little defense, there are still those who would accuse this great talent of being no less than a "boy band fop with Afro-American presumptions." Mr. Timberlake has always been far too talented to cohabitate with that egregious group of sadsacks known as *N SYNC, and now that he's attempting to branch out into the hiphop oeuvre, he is often unfairly ridiculed for past associations. However, anyone who has listened to his solo endeavor, Justified, with its stellar production by such highly regarded hiphop maestros as The Neptunes, realizes that Mr. Timberlake is more than the sum of his boy-band parts, and is in fact an excellent R&B singer in the classic sense. (Except for his insistence on beatboxing, which is a butt-clenching embarrassment.) It is with this in mind that I beg you to forgive Justin of his past, and give a talented singer his due. This is not the case for Christina Aguilera, who we all know is a slut. WM. STEVEN HUMPHREY



WEDNESDAY 6/11

DOUG THERIAULT, YARD
(The Know, 2202 NE Alberta) On Unidentified (Toast and Jam), Doug Theriault plugs his guitar into a sampler and, using specialized software, makes it sound like a pair of scissors, the horn of a Chevy Cavalier, surgery or evaporation. It's conceptual, abstract, and if you look away, you might miss something. Yard will be on the old mix-and-mash, playing live laptop mash-ups for the wonderment of the collective subconscious. God, this century RULES! JS



ANDREW BIRD, THE COURT & SPARK,

tim bluhm
(Blackbird) Violinist virtuoso Andrew Bird is flying solo these days. Bird, who gained fame fiddling with swing revivalists the Squirrel Nut Zippers, broke with his backing quartet, the Bowl of Fire, last year. However, in spite of all of this transition, Andrew Bird is doing well for himself. The first pressing of his latest album, Weather Systems, a mix of jazz, folk, and rock, has totally sold out, and is being re-released this summer. In Portland, Bird will be supported by San Francisco's brooding alt-country group, The Court and Spark. But the real question on everyone's mind is... when will there be a rooftop performance? I mean, everyone loves a fiddler on the roof. STEVE LANNING



RACEBANNON, HELEN OF TROY, SOLIAH SHAWCROSS, SAMUS ARAN
(Disjecta) Racebannon are brokers of instrumental chaos, conceiving new incarnations of noise with their tools and slapping the afterbirth across the eardrums of everyone within earshot. Their music is an avant hardcore combination of metal, post-rock, and industrial, with a steady, bottom-heavy rhythm section maintaining focus like the eye of a tornado as everything else is uprooted and swirling around it. JM



THE BUZZCOCKS, BILLY TALENT, EXPLODING HEARTS
(Berbati's) Over the last decade, as '77-class punk bands re-form under dubious circumstances and fans play the increasingly pointless "should they or shouldn't they" games, the Buzzcocks have dodged the cred debate because they never totally quit in the first place. Aside from a brief rest in the mid-'80s, these Mancunians have frequently toured and recorded, with minor lineup switcheroos. The last few years have been especially active, with 1999's Modern (Go Kart) being one of their best records. They've finally found a smart indie (Merge) whose roster includes bands inspired by the Buzzcocks' fevered pop. Their bow for the label, Buzzcocks, won't inspire much, as age is sapping some vocal melodic twists and overall the record is a fairly rote run-through of their sound. But with the requisite four really good songs, it's worth nabbing for fans, and the live show is still a total pogo a gogo. ERIC DAVIDSON