THURSDAY 10/25

THURSTON MOORE, SCORCES

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

THE SUPER QUEER LUSTY FUN XTRAVAGANZA: JENNIFER LANIER, KIMBERLY DARK

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See My, What a Busy Week!

MESHELL NDEGEOCELLO, KUDU

(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) See Music Feature.

HIMSA, SPLATTERHOUSE, WARCORPSE, SIBERIA

(Dante's, 1 SW 3rd) This is what happens when worlds collide. Local thrashers Siberia, Warcorpse, and Splatterhouse will remind Himsa of where they came from—that teeming US underground scene in which metal and hardcore are one and the same—a place where bands are fueled by passion, integrity, and starvation. And Himsa will hint to these Portlanders of where they could be if they streamlined their productions, toured relentlessly, and injected melodies that teenage girls and thuggish emo boys could hum at school. If that sounds bad, keep in mind that it balances out considerably when you notice that Himsa is literally hundreds of times more popular, and actually stand to make a living off their art. NATHAN CARSON 

AESOP ROCK, BLACK MOTH SUPER RAINBOW, BLOCKHEAD, DJ SIGNIFY

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Easily the most rewarding artist on the Def Jux label, Aesop Rock has also been one of the few consistently relevant hiphop artists of the 21st century. Incredibly verbose and loaded with puns, his style and wordplay are what most backpackers only dream about, giving hope to suburban kids everywhere who are currently rapping in their parents' basement. His style, often coupled with gritty, painstaking beats, is as unique as it is clever, and with this year's stellar None Shall Pass, he's also courting the indierockers by enlisting vocal duties from John Darnielle of the Mountain Goats. With no sign of slowing down, it's quite possible that the best of Aesop Rock has yet to come, which, for the state of hiphop, is nothing short of great. ROB SIMONSEN

FRIDAY 10/26

MUM, TALKDEMONIC, TOM BROSSEAU

(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

THE PORTLAND CELLO PROJECT, FEATURING NORFOLK & WESTERN, LOCH LOMOND, SKIP VONKUSKE

(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) See Music Feature.

BLACK MOUNTAIN, THE CAVE SINGERS

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) In the past decade's stoner/psych-rock resurgence, no band's beards and long manes of black hair have come across on record as well as Black Mountain. Think Sabbath for the wake-and-bake crowd, their hard riffs mingling with laid-back folk and classic-rock jamming—like on the Velvet-appreciative "No Satisfaction," on which they beat tom drums and holler that "everybody likes to clang things around." Wuz that mean? Who cares? You won't want to be in a nitpicky mood at this gig if BM unveil their purported "17-minute multidimensional opus" from their In the Future album (due out next year). Another dimension, man. Do they clang there, too? SAM MACHKOVECH

PAUL CURRERI, DEVON SPROULE, BRETT VOGEL

(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Keep Your Silver Shined, the latest from Charlottesville, VA's Devon Sproule, has to be one of best-kept secrets of 2006. It's already permanently nudged its way into my daily playlist, and unless Radiohead releases nine more records this year (somehow this is a possibility), it will find a home in my yearly top 10. Sproule's sprawling folk glistens with tales of quaint rural living and hushed bedroom love songs, and while her peers seem desperate for attention of any kind, her voice coos with a soft and gentle confidence. Touring alongside her is husband Paul Curreri, a talented singer in his own right, who is less quaint than his better half, instead toggling between his roles as finger-picking acoustic balladeer and ragged bluesman, both of which he perfects with a slight country twang. EZRA ACE CARAEFF

HIGH ON FIRE, MONO, PANTHERS, COLISEUM

(Dante's, 1 SW 3rd) The day the new High on Fire promo arrived through my mail slot, an excited friend borrowed it. He's still got it, but luckily we're talking about one of the best metal bands out there, so I'm not exactly ill informed: I've been seeing the Bay Area trio since they first played at Satyricon for about 75 people. High on Fire now play to much larger crowds across the globe—apparently, slaying war-metal is a commodity all over the place. Their new (and fourth) album Death is the Communion was recorded in Seattle by grunge producer extraordinaire Jack Endino. I haven't heard it, but I know exactly what it sounds like. Motorhead and Judas Priest and AC/DC used to live on the road, and craft traditional heavy metal albums that you could trust. Now our generation has High on Fire. NC

NEW YOUNG PONY CLUB, REVERSE DOTTY AND THE CANDY CANE SHIVS, DJ RAD!

(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE 39th) Unlike many bands of their ilk, Britain's New Young Pony Club are riding the New Wave-synth-dance-revivalist movement straight to Awesometown. Incredibly sexy female lead vocalist? Check. Sleek, retro-stylish YouTube videos that you will immediately add to your favorites? Check. Scintillating melody lines that pulse just hard enough to get your booty shaking, but just soft enough to make you horny? Check. Yes, I'm talking about sex a lot in this paragraph: That's what makes a band like this stick out. Anyone can grab Pro Tools and eke out a faux-Eurotrash riff. Give me a big ol' boner, however, and I am yours. [That is disgusting.—Eds.] JUSTIN W. SANDERS

CAVES, STRENGTH, DJ BAGPUSS, DJ HANNUKAH MIRACLE, DJ PRETTY PLEASE

(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) Imagine my surprise when hearing the opening notes of "Curiosity," the first track from Get On With It, the debut longer-player from local beauties Caves. No longer sailing aboard the good ship Alternative Rock, these boys have gone all angular, swapping their massive, slick pop hooks for a more artistic slant of rigid bass lines and jerking rhythms. There is a very early-'80s Police vibe to the record, especially the opening song, with its yelped "Oi!" introduction. Faux-Cockney slang aside, singer Jacob Carey makes it look easy as his effortless voice coats every square inch of the record, and while their newfound Pink Flag influence begs for a bit more breathing room, it's hard to resist his charisma as a frontman. EAC

RADIO FREE SALEM BENEFIT: NODDING TREE REMEDIES, PLANTS, THE BLACK BLACK BLACK, NATHAN JR.

(Towne Lounge, 714 SW 20th Pl) With popular radio besieged by the manipulative hands of powerful commercial interests and the ever-looming presence of payola scandals, it's time to turn our attentions, and pocketbooks, to the benefits of community radio. Leave your emotionally vacant pop music and dirty-mouthed shock DJs by the wayside, scrounge together a measly five dollars, and come out in support of Salem's newest community radio station. And if aiding local, community-based radio isn't enough to get your motor running, the lads and ladies of the Salem Folklore Community have brought together a fine selection of, er, "folksy" bands to better draw the crowds. The most notable of these is local hippie-heroes, Plants, whose musical sound dips deeply into the well of soft psychedelia inhabited by the likes of Faust and the Flying Burrito Brothers. With four impressive bands and a good cause to support, this is an event you need to attend. NOAH SANDERS

THE POLYPHONIC SPREE, ROONEY, THE REDWALLS

(Roseland Theater, 8 NW 6th) What's more fun than a band that feels like a cult, despite lacking a religious agenda? Known for sporting choir robes and singing about happiness, love, and other hippy-dippyness, the Polyphonic Spree underwent an image shift this year. With their new album, The Fragile Army, the Spree replaced their signature white robes with military garb, plus they now showcase head honcho Tim DeLaughter's solo vocals a bit more and... yeah, okay, those are the only big changes. As always, your inner choir nerd will appreciate their obvious (and self-professed) love for ELO, and every time they kick up the rock behind the new tune "We Crawl," it seriously sounds like they are rewriting Styx's "Come Sail Away"—and that ain't half bad. JIM WITHINGTON

SATURDAY 10/27

BROKEN SOCIAL SCENE PRESENTS KEVIN DREW

(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) See My, What a Busy Week!

LIFE AT THESE SPEEDS, MENEGUAR, MY DISCO, NIGHT WOUNDS
(Satyricon, 125 NW 6th) There's something immediately satisfying about listening to Meneguar. When recorded—on 2005's I Was Born At Night and the just-released Strangers In Our House—they take the best elements of mid-'90s punk and throw in some sheer and winding guitar riffs. It's damn catchy and, in cases like I Was Born's "The Temp," it's lyrically affective as well. Live, things get even more visceral, as they're a band that begins at full-bore and moves onwards from there. Strangers boasts a stop-and-start dynamism and a thick bass sound in which there are plenty of moments to sing along while you pump those fists. TOBIAS CARROLL

SUNDAY 10/28

MAN MAN, THE BUILDERS AND THE BUTCHERS, TYPHOON

(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE 39th) See My, What a Busy Week!

CARIBOU, BORN RUFFIANS

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See Music Feature.

LAURA GIBSON, MUSEE MECANIQUE, PER SE

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Laura Gibson—sweet as pecan pie and talented enough to make this city swoon with parental pride—is headed off into the sunset once again, sure to conjure up greatness in her travels. In addition to touring the States, she's making her initial jaunt across the pond and will be traveling with a brand new handmade tour EP by her side. But it's not just Gibson and a box of CDs on this journey; the sweet-voiced folksinger of home-spun melodies and sweet melancholy will have some muscle behind her, as she is now backed by local pop band Musee Mecanique. Going from solo to a half-dozen members will be quite the switch, but she is returning the favor by joining the Musee crew as their accordion player. According to Gibson, "This will be my first time playing accordion for an audience," so no yelling out polka requests, okay? EAC

AMANDA PALMER, ESTRADASPHERE, ESKIMO AND SONS

(Berbati's Pan, 10 SW 3rd) Amanda Palmer, the charismatic voice of the Dresden Dolls, strikes it out on her lonesome, sans drummer Brian Viglione. Her solo performances aren't a whole lot different than the Dolls are in a live setting, but instead of all the hits being marched out, look for plenty of covers. Her repertoire includes tunes from Radiohead, St. Vincent, Magnetic Fields, Death Cab, and more, and maybe if you play your cards right, she'll play some material from her debut solo release, Who Killed Amanda Palmer?, due out next year. Fellow pianist Ben Folds produced the record, but thankfully he won't be in attendance tonight. Consider that a win-win situation. EAC

MONDAY 10/29

YO LA TENGO

(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) See My, What a Busy Week!

PARSON RED HEADS, DAY OF LIONS,

OH DARLING

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See Once More With Feeling!

TUESDAY 10/30

DAVID KILGOUR, EUROS CHILDS, THE NEWSPAPERS, EAT SKULL

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See Music Feature.

ARCHITECTURE IN HELSINKI, GLASS CANDY, PANTHER

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Things the name Architecture In Helsinki would better serve than a band: a new Renny Harlin romantic comedy; a cheap Ikea subsidiary; a fine strain of blow; a multi-instrumentalist Aussie quintet. That last one because, while AiH shed two members since 2005's In Case We Die, they'd surely be able to withstand the loss of another. And, hey, less overhead. Twee-riffic! They seem open to creative and professional change, too. After impressing this continent with their '05 sleeper disc, AiH got a little ambitious and aligned with Polyvinyl for August's Places Like This. Band kingpin Cameron Bird, too, relocated to the States in that time (though friends/family may remember that Bird was smitten with Portland a few years back). Naturally, the band's exuberant pop charms are as eclectic and anchorless as ever these days. We'll all float on alright indeed. TRISTAN STADDON

KID ROCK

(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Hiphop-weaned rabble rocker Kid Rock's Rock N Roll Jesus just catapulted the stringy long hair to his first ever perch atop the Billboard album charts. Derivative and depthless, Rock N Roll Jesus won't up and save even the eagerest of rap-rock aficionados, so feel free to charge Rock with hubris and overindulgence of the Jesus juice—just don't call him sacrilegious. On stage with his highly capable Twisted Brown Trucker band, the zealous performer sails through a party-hearty catalogue, displays turntable wizardry—à la deceased hip hop titan Jam Master Jay—and tributes the classic rock Gods in epic fashion. JALYLAH BURRELL

HANNAH MONTANA, MILEY CYRUS

(Rose Garden, 1 Center Ct) "What is UP with Hannah Montana?" As a TV columnist I get asked this question about three times a week, so here's the lowdown: Hannah Montana is a tween show on the Disney channel, starring Miley Cyrus (daughter of "Achy-Breaky Heart" singer Billy Ray Cyrus, who also plays her pop on the show). Miley plays Miley Stewart, who is a famous pop star by night (named Hannah Montana), and a normal dorkus high school student by day (in order to protect her anonymity). If you love screechy, community theater-style acting and saccharine pop songs—which a billion American teens do—then get your parents to pay $700 for tickets to this show, which will feature songs from both Miley Cyrus as well as her alter ego "Hannah Montana." This is really getting into Andy Kaufman-esque territory. WILLIAM STEVEN HUMPHREY

WEDNESDAY 10/31

DIGITAL UNDERGROUND, TONE LOC

(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) See My, What a Busy Week!

THE PIPETTES, THE SHEE BEE GEES, MONSTER BOBBY

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) The Pipettes recall fellow Brit export Amy Winehouse as girl group admirers (or interlopers), but there a road diverges, as the Brighton-bred trio ambles amidst a cutesy pop soundscape whilst the ballet-slippered Winehouse kicks up a bluesy dust cloud. RiotBecki, Rosay, and Gwenno—and their all-male band, the Cassette—crudely copy the tapestry of acquitted murderer and raving eccentric Phil Spector's Wall of Sound. Not quite compensating for what they lack in ingenuity, they spit rather snarkily at blah boys on their declamatory stateside debut, We Are The Pipettes. The ladies "don't want to be wined and dined," as they harmonize on their song, "Because It's Not Love," but to "bump and grind," a motto that the soignée ladies hope to make manifest at the Wonder Ballroom's all ages affair. JB

ROCKY VOTOLATO, JESSE SYKES & THE SWEET HEREAFTER, SLENDER MEANS, MIKE D
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE 39th) Seattle's Slender Means titled their 2005 album Neon & Ruin, and the term works quite well as a description of the band's sound. This is a group that can evoke glossy urban landscapes alongside portraits of desperation and depression. It's the sort of large-scale, deeply catchy rock music that frontman Josh Dawson has been making with a series of bands for over a decade. Slender Means fuses his archetypally clear vocals and soaring hooks with some rougher aspects, and the result is both resonant and catchy as all hell. Live, guitarist Sonny Votolato (brother to tourmate Rocky Votolato) acts as the perfect foil to Dawson, and the entire band exceeds the precision heard on their recorded work. TC

ENON, LOVE OF DIAGRAMS

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Most bands dress up for Halloween. Except for bands of Jehovah's Witnesses, of course. But Enon, as the initiated will tell you, are not most bands. So don't be surprised when John Schmersal and Toko Yasuda pause mid-set on Wednesday and remove the human costumes they've been wearing the past couple decades. Tricks and treats, these guys think of everything. Anyone who's heard the spice in their jams—particularly those on their brand-new Grass Geysers... Carbon Clouds album—is likely already suspicious that these New York-via-Ohio (via Melmac?) masterminds are actually aliens/machines (alien machines?). Sweet, well-oiled rock candy alien-machines capable of subverting straight-up intelli-pop into thick, thought-demanding art rock, that is. Expect a special night. It comes but once a year, after all. TS