THURSDAY 3/20

BOREDOMS, HUMAN BELL

(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!.

SCHOOL OF LANGUAGE, LEY LINES, CHARLES WESTMORELAND

(Towne Lounge, 714 SW 20th Pl) See Music Feature.

MAD PROFESSOR, RUDEMENT, REV SHINES, OHMEGA WATTS, DJ KEZ, DUNDIGGY

(Someday Lounge, 125 NW 5th) After the Scientist, the third and last dub master of the Jamaican period (1970 to 1982), there is Mad Professor. He and Adrian Sherwood inaugurated the British period of dub's 40-year history. Mad Professor has produced an entire dub universe that has its core in roots reggae but also contains numerous encounters with hiphop, soul, punk, lovers' rock, and triphop. Indeed, his most famous work on this side of the Atlantic is his remix of Massive Attack's second album, Protection. His version is called No Protection, and like all great dubs, it outdoes the original. Mad Professor launched the ordinary beauty of Massive Attack's album into a vast sky and exploded it with fancy lights and falling stars. Get this record; watch this show. CHARLES MUDEDE

THE BUILDERS & THE BUTCHERS, FEDERALE, INVISIBLE ROCKETS

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Are you ready, world? We're serious this time. No fucking around. Portland's hometown heroes, the Builders and the Butchers, are going to own you in a matter of months. I know, world, I know. You've been hearing this same chest-swelling bravado about the B&Bs for well over a year now, but they're fresh off a tour with the Helio Sequence and a trio of high-exposure performances at SXSW, so their time is nigh. Their homegrown, shit-kickin' graveyard-junk folk contains elements of south-of-the-border mariachi ballads, Salvation Army-band marches, gypsy funeral waltzes, and looped-on-moonshine Kentucky bluegrass; it's as timeless and deathless as any kind of American music you'd care to name. So you're not going to screw this up, are you, world? When that call comes, you'd better answer it. 'Cause I'd hate to be wrong—the Builders and the Butchers are really that good. NED LANNAMANN

BUCKETHEAD, THAT 1 GUY

(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) Buckethead has been out of Guns N' Roses since 2004, but is he out of Chinese Democracy? The infamously delayed album that has cost a reported $13 million will still feature Buckethead's shredding, if recent internet rumors are any indication. Last month, an unsubstantiated announcement made the rounds that the band has secured the rights to Buckethead's guitar work from an "earlier recording of the album." In 2006, several leaked Guns N' Roses tracks—"Better," "T.W.A.T. (There Was a Time)," "Madagascar," and "I.R.S."—contained guitar parts by Buckethead, according to fans familiar with his work in the band. Last month also saw a rumored finalized track listing for Chinese Democracy that included each of these songs. Who will win in a mixdown containing chicken-fetishist/virtuoso Buckethead and his Zappa-like replacement, Bumblefoot, who plays a foot-shaped guitar? Only Axl Rose knows for sure. MIKE MEYER

JASON COLLETT

(Fez Ballroom, 316 SW 11th) Broken Social Scene guitarist Jason Collett's previous solo album, Idols of Exile, was an understated gem that effectively captured longings of youth, regrets of adulthood, and the movie-screen-flicker joy of life, in a collection of folk-pop songs that were as simple, comfortable, and knowing as an old pair of jeans. His new record, Here's to Being Here, aims higher but with less consistent results. There are some great moments ("Out of Time," "Not over You"), but the album's ambition frequently lapses into overblown production ("Roll on Oblivion"), and the '70s-cocktail-lounge smirk of some other tracks prevents the listener from truly connecting with the material. Still, time spent in the legendary Broken Social Scene collective has had lasting influence on Collett, which means that his flawless guitar playing is inventive and tasteful, and his pop-songwriter's hat is cocked intriguingly askew. NL

FRIDAY 3/21

THE VELVET TEEN, ALOHA, CROSSTIDE, CARCRASHLANDER

(Someday Lounge, 125 NW 5th) See Music Feature.

MARCH INTO DARKNESS: MIDDIAN, INDIAN, RED FANG, SUBARACHNOID SPACE

(Berbati's Pan, 10 SW 3rd) See My, What a Busy Week!, and Once More with Feeling.

BLACK MOTH SUPER RAINBOW, DENGUE FEVER

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) After a number of recent trips to Grumptown supporting other bands, Black Moth Super Rainbow are finally here on their own, and it's about time. The previous trips—"trip" being the operative word—were somewhat prohibitive. First they appeared before the eclipsing extravaganza that is the Flaming Lips. Then they were poorly packaged alongside the backpacker rap of Atmosphere. But now, without anything looming in their way, Black Moth's super drugged-out vintage psychedelia will be given a fair chance to flower. With their smooth, slippery mess of keyboards, vocoder, chunky bass, and drums, the Pennsylvanians will spread their fantastic, creamy, Technicolor pop throughout the sky. Colors will change and shift, and as the band stretches out, that flower—reaching up toward the now-purple sky—will melt, dripping and poisoning the ground beneath with a whole new set of hues. ANDREW R. TONRY

BORN RUFFIANS, CADENCE WEAPON, NURSES

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Cadence Weapon is the nom de rap of Rollie Pemberton of Edmonton, Alberta—son of pioneering Canadian hiphop radio DJ Teddy Pemberton. The young Pemberton began rapping at 13 and started writing record reviews for Pitchfork while still a teenager. Predictably, Cadence Weapon boasts both a historical understanding of hiphop (and pop and indie) but also a sharply attuned critical wit—academic cred rather than 'hood. His delivery is all wordy, indie-rap aggression, rhymes that alternately land squarely on 4/4 beats and strain with obscure references and multisyllabics. On his new album, Afterparty Babies, his hyperactive flow is intensified by his slightly sinister electro-carnival productions. ERIC GRANDY

TOM CLARK

(Ohm, 31 NW 1st) Tom Clark has been making an impact in the dance music scene for over a decade. He's best known for his residency at Tresor, the Berlin dance club/record label largely responsible for cultivating the Detroit sound in Europe, where its popularity would ultimately swell into a full-blown phenomenon. Clark also co-founded Gold Plate Music back when there were only a handful of club music labels in Berlin, and launched Highgrade Records in 2000 to counteract a lull he detected in the innovation of house music. A survey of his relentless touring schedule suggests that Clark has DJ'ed in just about every European club with a sound system, while his discography of remixes, collaborations, and affiliations reads like a little black book of international techno. Clark plays in Portland at Ohm, the former go-to spot that has been quietly attempting to restore its reputation as an institution of underground dance music. AVA HEGEDUS

CD BABY 10TH ANNIVERSARY: ARISTEIA, SETI

(East End, 203 SE Grand) Perhaps I'm biased—I used to work there—but CD Baby is pretty much the shit. Anyone in the world can sign up with the Portland-based independent music distributor, which accounts for their exhaustive selection of new age dribble-drabble, brainless Christian church music, and shitty home-cooked hiphop. However, they also work with literally thousands of totally unknown, entirely awesome artists, and tonight's bill for their 10th anniversary celebration proves this point. Considering the amount of stylistic ground CD Baby covers, it would have been easy for them to pick a full slate of pop-tastic mainstream acts, but instead they've decided to uncover some unheralded local bands that make ponderously ominous and gorgeously fascinating music, including the woolly, sun-flared post-rock of AristeiA and the sumptuously epic instrumental head-trip of Seti. So go tonight—it's absolutely free—and help celebrate a big, fat reason why Portland's music scene is so fantastic. NL

THE PINK SNOWFLAKES, THEBROTHEREGG, PINK WIDOWER, CANDY APPLE

(Ash Street Saloon, 225 SW Ash) Thebrotheregg should be commended for holding it together since the early '90s and for never resting in any particularly genre, although they should also be reprimanded for using a band name with such blatant hatred for the space bar key. It seems like everything from the band, including their live set, varies drastically, and their latest self-titled EP once again finds them evolving their sound in deliberate, slight motions, settling into a bouncy and polite pop groove. Songs like "Simpleton" are awash in soft melodies and coated with sugary pop lyrics: "We play guitars/We play with matches/Sometimes we come home with blackberry scratches." The EP is relaxed and confident, the sort of recording you'd expect from an experienced band that isn't trying to be anything it's not. EZRA ACE CARAEFF

GRAND ARCHIVES

(Dante's, 1 SW 3rd) Prior to Grand Archives, Mat Brooke's voice had been used primarily as a foil for a more aggressive bandmate (Jenn Ghetto in Carissa's Wierd, Ben Bridwell in Band of Horses). Four of the five members of Grand Archives contribute vocals, and the layers of harmonies and reverberations that suffuse the songs of their self-titled debut suggest that the band prefers its pop with as much atmosphere as possible. The debut has the sound of five musicians still working out the full parameters of their sound, but that process is nonetheless taking them to some fascinating corners of impressionist pop. TOBIAS CARROLL

SATURDAY 3/22

HEADLIGHTS, EVANGELICALS, SOUTHERLY

(Towne Lounge, 714 SW 20th Pl) See My, What a Busy Week!.

MARCH INTO DARKNESS: AGALLOCH, RED SPAROWES, GRAYCEON, RUSSIAN CIRCLES

(Berbati's Pan, 10 SW 3rd) See My, What a Busy Week!; Music Feature; and Once More with Feeling.

KAKI KING, MATT SHEEHY

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Before Kaki King was a frontwoman, she was an experimental acoustic guitarist who recorded strange instrumental albums that fans of polyrhythmic fingerpicker Preston Reed might enjoy. For a while, like many outsiders, she busked on New York City subway platforms. Her solo debut, 2003's Everybody Loves You, was a culmination of her young life's work: a flurry of slaps, taps, harmonics, and lovelorn phrases that spoke for themselves. With nails scraping, fingers thumping, and hands slithering, she was no indie rocker—she was a guitar god. Over the past two years, King has transformed into a lead singer and gone mostly electric; her music now suggests Mary Timony circa Ladyfest 2000. But on tracks such as "2 O'Clock" from her new album, Dreaming of Revenge, she drifts back to those virtuosic acoustic days—fast, weird, colliding with the world. King also performs at Music Millennium (3158 E Burnside) at 3:30 pm. MM

K.D. LANG, DUSTIN O'HALLORAN

(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) On the heels of the vernal equinox, handsome crooner K.D. Lang blows through town touting her new release, Watershed, and its bluesy lead single "I Dream of Spring," on which she bemoans "cold dark places" and pines for renewal—much like her fans, for eight years, have yearned for original material. As characteristically melancholy, empathetic and satisfying as anything in Lang's improbable 25-year career, Watershed is no letdown. And the lovely Lang, armed with supple voice, facility in just about every genre, and uncommon humility, is poised to mount a transformational live show. JALYLAH BURRELL

SUNDAY 3/23

MARCH INTO DARKNESS: ASUNDER, WITCH MOUNTAIN, NADJA, TREES

(Berbati's Pan, 10 SW 3rd) See My, What a Busy Week!, and Once More with Feeling.

K.D. LANG, DUSTIN O'HALLORAN

(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) See Saturday's listing.

FAUN FABLES, A WEATHER, BACHELORETTE

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) I just assume Oakland's Faun Fables are saddled with the "folk" tag because there has never been a proper way to describe them. Essentially, their sound is freakish and dramatic, a wild and vividly theatrical way to address music as a dual platform for expression through song and art. Uh, yeah, let's just call it "folk." The most recent release from head Faun, Dawn McCarthy, is an "ultra-limited" (although "21 used and new" are available on Amazon) split with Will Bonnie Prince Palace Oldham Billy, which features rare demos the two exchanged over the years. Joining them is the hazy, digital shoegaze pop of New Zealand's Bachelorette, and the sleepy-eyed whisperers of A Weather, fresh from releasing their gorgeous debut, Cove. EAC

MONDAY 3/24

JENS LEKMAN, THE HONEYDRIPS, MARLA HANSEN

(Berbati's Pan, 10 SW 3rd) See My, What a Busy Week!.

PHOSPHORESCENT, BON IVER, WHITE HINTERLAND

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See Music Feature.

CARBON/SILICON, MATT POND PA

(Lola's Room, 1332 W Burnside) Mick Jones. Seriously. Mick motherfucking Jones. There's a chance to see a member of the Clash performing in an intimate room tonight, and that should be all you need to hear. It should be enough to drop the paper right now and run wild-eyed in a rabid search for tickets. But that Jones is simply coming isn't all you need to know. First, he's here honestly—this isn't some money-grab tour packaged on lingering goodwill—and second, it's not some kind of play-the-old-hits sad retread. Carbon/Silicon (also featuring Generation X's Tony James) are a modern band with a new album. Samples and electronics meet Jones' recognizable melodies as he reformats punk isolation and angst for this cold, passive, modern age. It's fucking fabulous, especially when I'd have been happy enough to catch Jones reading the newspaper or just making a sandwich. ART Also see My, What a Busy Week!..

TUESDAY 3/25

VAMPIRE WEEKEND, YACHT

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!.

MANCAMPUS: YAKUZA, HEATHEN SHRINE, SELECTOR MANCAMPUS

(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) One of the heaviest sets ever caught on tape was a 1992 meeting of Yamantaka Eye (Boredoms), Kevin Sharp (Brutal Truth), and saxophonist John Zorn, along with the rest of Naked City. Eye is hooded and screaming nonstop, Sharp is death-grunting so much that he begins to cough, and Zorn skronks like a pig as the rest of the band shudders away. It's a piece called Leng Tch'e, their reaction to photographs from an Imperial Chinese execution. Though not upstaging Naked City, Chicago's Yakuza find a way to make this timeless set seem dated. On Transmutations, lead singer/saxophonist Bruce Lamont juggles lunatic vocals with smooth sax. "Egocide" sounds like two tracks playing at once, with jazz freeing itself through Meshuggah-like rhythm. It's fitting that he sessioned with black metal progressives Nachtmystium on their upcoming album. MM

WEDNESDAY 3/26

JUSTICE, DIPLO, FANCY

(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) See My, What a Busy Week!.

NADA SURF, SEA WOLF

(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) After triumphantly emerging from the major-label dumpster and establishing themselves as a top-tiered indie rock force to be reckoned with, few bands were easier to root for than Nada Surf. Unscathed by the one-hit wonder curse, the band was reinvented as a vital member of indie culture that could craft charming pop numbers with carefree ease. So what happened? Their latest, Lucky, is a mid-tempo mess of light-rock balladry that lacks the playful bite of their past recordings. The band always teetered that fine line between simplistic genius, and, oh, let's say, Collective Soul, but now they've tumbled to the cold, hard ground floor of alt-rock mediocrity, a location that, in the past, they always seemed to find a way to avoid. EAC

TEDDY THOMPSON, ROSIE THOMAS

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Teddy Thompson's blurb on the Doug Fir's website awkwardly reads "genetically blessed," which one hopes is a reference to the musical gifts biologically bestowed upon him by his parents, British folk legends Richard and Linda Thompson, rather than a description of any other part of his anatomy. Teddy, though supremely talented, has floundered a little in finding his own voice—he's swooned alongside other second-generation progenies Rufus and Martha Wainwright; his 2005 record, Separate Ways, had pleasant moments but ventured too far into boringly pussified James Taylor territory. His latest, Upfront & Down Low, consists of reverential covers of classic country songs, and while it's probably one of the most authentic and enjoyable country albums to come out in recent months, it still indicates that Thompson hasn't yet found how best to make use of that gorgeously clarion voice with which he is so amply endowed. NL