Oh Captain, My Captain Holocene, 10/10

THURSDAY 10/9

FALL INTO DARKNESS: THRONES, ANCIENT AGE, DARK SKIES, PURPLE RHINESTONE EAGLE

(Berbati's Pan, 10 SW 3rd) Something evil this way comes with tonight's deafening kickoff to the Fall Into Darkness Festival—four glorious days of metal, metal, and more metal. Things start tonight with the chaos of Thrones, and Olympia's Wolves in the Throneroom play on Friday. Meanwhile, Finnish legends Amorphis cap off Saturday's performances, then the absolutely frightening Sunn O))) finish you off on Sunday. Be afraid. EZRA ACE CARAEFF

BLUE GIANT, PORTLAND CELLO PROJECT

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Wrapping up their three-date Portland Tour '08, tonight sees Blue Giant performing an "all organic collaborative evening" with the Portland Cello Project. It sounds pretty exciting; after the Cello Project performs classical pieces by Arvo Part and John Tavener, they'll join Blue Giant for a full-length joint set. Imagining Blue Giant's laid-back, psych-country-rock tunes with a whole bunch of cellos buzzing along sounds pretty damn strange—but pretty damn appealing, too. Blue Giant is the new Portland supergroup with Kevin and Anita Robinson of Viva Voce and newest member Chris Funk of the Decemberists. You'll get a coupon for Blue Giant's latest digital single included in the ticket price tonight, and Corinna Repp from Tu Fawning is reportedly making a guest appearance, too, so this bill is no mere one-off novelty collaboration—it's a musical event that you'll kick yourself for missing. NED LANNAMANN

MATTHEW DEAR'S BIG HANDS, TELEFON TEL AVIV, AROHAN

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) At some point, the IDM genre got eaten alive by electro, and that's a damn shame considering that electro seems to incorporate every dumbass hipster with a synth, skinny jeans, and 120+ bpm. Matthew Dear, on the other hand, is a pillar of Intelligent Dance Music. Experimenting with just the right thickness of manipulated tweaks (never complicated for complication's sake), Dear backs it all up with anthemic, deceptively straightforward beats—you could imagine some of these low ends fitting in Joy Division songs, while others could back up Kylie Minogue. Equally stellar are Telefon Tel Aviv, who somehow make propulsive, standout ambient sounds (rightly self-described as "ambient-psych"). Their Map of What Is Effortless stands the test of time as one of the most lush, intricate, and just plain pretty electronic records of the last decade. HANNAH CARLEN

WEEZER, ANGELS & AIRWAVES, TOKYO POLICE CLUB

(Memorial Coliseum, 300 Winning Way) Rivers, my friend, what did we ever do to deserve such contempt? I've been there since the early club shows around the release of the Blue Album, through the magnificent growth that was Pinkerton, the vague hiatus, the new lineup, and even a dark little period where I was convinced the Green Album was halfway decent. And while I seldom agree that artists owe fans anything above and beyond in exchange for their support, what the holy hell did we do to deserve this? Maladroit? That one song ("We Are All on Drugs") that borrows its structure from the diarrhea song? Topping off your already creepy persona with a thick bushy 'stache? Rivers, you're one reggaeton cameo by Daddy Yankee (Weezer fans, you know this is coming sooner or later) from officially entering the territory of being a parody. Then again, after hearing your new record, I'm afraid you might already be there. EAC

FRIDAY 10/10

RUNAWAY: CAVES, CANCER RISING, PLEASURE REEL, DJ HANNUKAH MIRACLE, JEW HEFNER

(Someday Lounge, 125 NW 5th) It's Fashion Week here in Portland (yes, really), but not all the action is on the official runway, nor is it just for fashion types: Run Away is a group show featuring six accessory and apparel designers, three DJs, and live music from Caves and Cancer Rising. MARJORIE SKINNER

MURS, KIDZ IN THE HALL, ISAIAH

(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE 39th) See Hail to the Chief.

FALL INTO DARKNESS: WOLVES IN THE THRONE ROOM, LUDICRA, NACHTMYSTIUM, SILENTIST

(Berbati's Pan, 10 SW 3rd) See Gray Dawn.

THE MINT CHICKS, OH CAPTAIN MY CAPTAIN, NATHAN DETROIT, DUNDIGGY

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Presumably taking their name from Walt Whitman, Portland's Oh Captain My Captain are celebrating the forthcoming release of their album, Recklessly She Split the Sea, on Bladen County Records. From the name alone, you might expect twee seafaring ballads in the vein of the Decemberists, but Oh Captain My Captain's shanties hew closer to A Salty Dog-era Procol Harum. Album opener "Anne Marie" marries solemn piano and sustained guitar notes, with vocalist Jesse Bettis channeling his best Gary Brooker, for a muscularly impressive song that skirts both glam and psychedelia. "On My Mind" has minor-key, staccato stabs alongside riff-tastic guitar trills; there's an homage to the same five notes from Pink Floyd's "Echoes" that Andrew Lloyd Webber stole, and a "Paranoid Android" hymn-like coda, but the song feels entirely fresh. It's the guitar heroics of Oh Captain My Captain that really stick, evoking '70s titans like Mick Ronson, Robin Trower, and Thin Lizzy. NL

GOOD LUCK, PAUL BARIBEAU, HEY TIGER!, KICKBALL, DESTROY NATE ALLEN

(The Coop, 3535 N Lombard) With Into Lake Griffy, Bloomington, Indiana's Good Luck have released what is quite possibly the greatest pop-punk record of the year, if not one of the best records of the year, pop, punk, or otherwise. Taking cues from acts like Samiam or early Promise Ring, the band creates kinetic energy that is equal parts sweaty basements, budding relationships, and love for their friends, and—in true Midwestern fashion—the themes are nostalgic but never anything less than overwhelmingly positive. Their songs are instantly catchy—due in large part to the pitch perfect melodies and the insanely raucous percussion—and you'd be hard pressed to find a record that is as easily playable, and repeatable, as Into Lake Griffy. ROB SIMONSEN

GAVIN WAHL-STEPHENS, THE MOONDOGGIES

(White Eagle, 836 N Russell) The Moondoggies hit a sweet spot that's difficult to describe without inadvertently alienating potential fans. Does the idea of jammy, bluesy boogie rock turn you off? Sure, the Seattle quartet makes that kind of music—and Deadheads are gonna love it—but you might dig it too, in the same way that you treasure the Band's first two albums, or the way you still regularly listen to the Flying Burrito Brothers' The Gilded Palace of Sin, or the way you liked My Morning Jacket before their last record shat the bed. It's a fine line between hippies and hipsters, which few bands are able to tread, but when they can pull it off—see also: Fleet Foxes, Band of Horses, Langhorne Slim—the rewards are bountiful. So light one up (you know you do, hippie) and see the Moondoggies in a small room while you still have the chance. NL

KARL BLAU, GRAVES, CARCRASHLANDER, NATE ASHLEY

(The Artistery, 4315 SE Division) He may not be Bill Callahan, David Berman, or even K Records founder Calvin Johnson, but Karl Blau (whose newly released Holiday in Rhode Island is on the venerable K label) still sits high amongst the upper echelon of mopester songwriters. Touches of his experimental bend have kept Blau on the more engaging side of the lo-fi spectrum, as he mixes fuzzed-out dance noise (with the occasional shout-along) with more stripped-down, sing-song elements. Does this sound like the perfect performer for an intimate Artistery show? You bet it does. HC

THEE OH SEES, TY SEGALL, HERE COMES A BIG BLACK CLOUD

(Slabtown, 1033 NW 16th) Sloppy, chunky garage rock is the name of the game for Thee Oh Sees, who have taken all the roiling Pacific fog of San Francisco Bay and stuffed it into their guitar amps. A single plucked chord is closer to a howling alarm siren, feeding back upon itself and turning into a blistering squall. Twin vocals by Brigid Dawson and the ever-prolific John Dwyer (Coachwhips, Pink and Brown) sound like stolen transmissions from the enemy's radio frequency, with fuzzy moaning and a thick veil of echo. For all of these baneful elements, however, Thee Oh Sees actually sound like a really fun, friendly party—a party you could even bring your little sister to. Halloween is still a few weeks off, but the twisted garage bomp of Thee Oh Sees will make you feel like dressing up like a ghoul, spiking the punch, and doing the "Monster Mash" until dawn. NL

SATURDAY 10/11

HIGH DIALS, NUDITY, BENJAMIN STARSHINE

(East End, 203 SE Grand) The High Dials bridge the gap between revved-up mod anthems and neo-psych mindblots, and their last album, War of the Wakening Phantoms, included power pop grooves alongside arcane lyrics. Tonight, the Montreal band will be previewing the goods from the new Moon Country album, and they'll be joined by Olympia's Nudity, who explore the darker flipside of the psychedelic coin. NL

GIANT SAND, CHAD VANGAALEN, TRACKER

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See Banjos to Bit-Synths.

LOCH LOMOND

(The Press Club, 2621 SE Clinton) See Once More with Feeling.

BENEFIT FOR JOEL: FIREBALLS OF FREEDOM, PURE COUNTRY GOLD, LOPEZ, RAPIDS, THE NIGHT SLAVES, THE LEADERS, HALF ROUNDED BASTARD FILE, L.R.S.D., DJ MATTO, DJ CHINATOWN

(Plan B, 1305 SE 8th) The worst part of owning a bar? Drunk people. The best part? When you get sick and suffer a nasty fall, those very same drunk people rally together and throw a mighty fundraiser in your honor. This is the case for Joel Denton—who was diagnosed with progressive multiple sclerosis and then later was hospitalized after suffering a fall—the owner of E Burnside watering hole the B-Side Tavern, and the gracious recipient of tonight's benefit, which takes place at the similarly-named Plan B. Featuring a bevy of Portland's finest raucous performers—from the reckless excess of Fireballs of Freedom to the raw howl of the boys in Pure Country Gold—plus there will be films projected on the big screen and a raffle as well. Nothing a bunch of drunk people like more than a raffle. Well, that, and more alcohol. EAC

FALL INTO DARKNESS: AMORPHIS, SAMAEL, VIRGIN BLACK, SCHOOL OF ROCK

(Berbati's Pan, 10 SW 3rd) The eternal battle between good and evil is just as integral to the pulse of symphonic metal as pretty-lady sparkle and grunty-pig narration. And considering the early work of Black Sabbath, whose Christian protagonists wept beneath the heel of a godless oppression, this struggle concerns doom metal as well. So when members of Australia's Virgin Black went on record with Christian beliefs, it made enough sense. The ambitious band tackles each of these melodramatic styles on its funeral-doom march to the altar of post-metal gothic rock (aka Agalloch-land). This year's Requiem—Fortissimo is a haunted house of mixed-use metal, forcing us to crawl slowly toward some light at the end of the tunnel while covered in guts. MIKE MEYER

LEO KOTTKE, LOUDON WAINWRIGHT III

(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) To be honest, it's a bit staggering to leaf through the massive songwriting catalog of Loudon Wainwright III and pick out a favorite. The father to Rufus and Martha has always kept his songwriting material close to the vest, from his numerous sincere ballads of struggling with parenthood ("A Father and a Son"; "Rufus Is a Tit Man"; "Hitting You"), his rapidly disintegrating family ("Your Mother and I"; anything from Last Man on Earth), the youthful indiscretions of "Motel Blues" (his high wire act of balancing the sincere emptiness of being alone on the road with his carnal desire to bed a bite-happy 19-year-old groupie), or any of the other dozens of tracks he's penned over the past four decades. The only regret is that tonight he won't play everything you want him to play, thus proving a life lesson he has been crooning about for years: Life is not fair. EAC

TERRY MULLAN

(The Station, 2410 N Mississippi) Terry Mullan grew up in Chicago back when house music was just emerging. He took an interest in the scene as it was being formed, listening to the house DJs on underground radio and recording mixtapes. Not satisfied with the sterile, conventional sounds of the genre, he found his niche when acid house came around and shifted the music in a different, weirder direction. Mullan made a name for himself when his track "Sidewinder" was included in a Chemical Brothers mix on Definitive Records in the mid-1990s, and he became a regular on the international rave circuit. Tonight is a chance to see a legendary figure in the house music scene that has been in it since the get-go. AVA HEGEDUS

FLOGGING MOLLY, BEAT UNION, THE GIRLS, MY LIFE IN BLACK & WHITE

(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Raise a pint to Flogging Molly—the Lords of the Punk Rock Dance—for tapping Seattle's stylish punkers the Girls as openers on a slew of West Coast dates. No longer the fresh faces of the Dirtnap roster, the Girls have streamlined their hook-heavy, synth-heavier sound over the past few years, a fact that is quickly evident on their most recent release, Yes No Yes No Yes No. While the band leans towards the vintage sound of classic new wave—at times, these spuds are one "energy dome" away from transforming into Devo—it's a respectful influence, one hardly used as a selling point as much as it is to flesh out their enthusiastic presentation. EAC

SUNDAY 10/12

BLACK KIDS, THE VIRGINS, HOCKEY

(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE 39th) Those with an itch for a retro-buzz, synth-heavy dance-travaganza would do well to hop to Jacksonville, Florida's Black Kids. The new wave revival quintet has been garnering a deserved blotch of attention by way of sassy boy/girl vocal dynamics and seamless mid-'80s fashionista groundwork. Time capsule rock is alive and well. RYAN J. PRADO

FALL INTO DARKNESS: SUNN O))), GRAILS, SUBARACHNOID SPACE, TREES

(Berbati's Pan, 10 SW 3rd) See Lights Out.

MONDAY 10/13

BORN RUFFIANS, PLANTS AND ANIMALS, NURSES

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Calling your band Plants and Animals gives you a pretty wide range of sonic possibilities and an expansive array of sounds with which to experiment. To their credit, this Montreal group makes good on that promise. Last year's With/Avec EP began with a folk-pop foundation but branched out from there into more complex, progressive territory. This year's Parc Avenue, by contrast, opts for a fuller sound, and while you can hear an acoustic guitar at the root of many of these songs, tracks such as "Mercy" incorporate brass, legions of backing vocalists, and structural shifts from pop into something more freeform. There's a restlessness to this group's music, a sense of steadily constant revision, and at times, it's powerfully immersive. TOBIAS CARROLL

TUESDAY 10/14

SARA BAREILLES, MARC BROUSSARD, RAINING JANE

(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) POSTPONED

WEDNESDAY 10/15

MAMMATUS, WILDILDLIFE, BRAVE PRIEST

(Someday Lounge, 125 NW 5th) Another gaggle of grandiose longhairs from Holy Mountain Records' stable of heavy psychedelia, Cali trio Mammatus forge an expansive, serpentine jammage that inspires as much headbanging as it does mind-expansion. Their self-titled 2006 album best captures Mammatus's mammoth, prog-metallic maneuvers, but the 2007 sophomore LP The Coast Explodes boasts a better title and suitable-for-framing cover art. Mammatus create sprawling, spiritual songs to which you can still throw devil horns. Seattle's Wildildlife have quaffed from the same bongwater-laced Kool-Aid bowl as Mammatus, so they should ably complement the trio on their quest for higher unconsciousness. DAVE SEGAL

HOT VICTORY, JIPPEDO, HIDE & GO HUSTLE

(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) What's the coolest instrument in the band? ...No, not the guitar. Sit down, mullet-head. It's the drums, of course! And it's obvious why: If you've got one drum, you've got a beat. Two drums? You got a beat and a melody. A whole drum kit? Instant dance party. Hot Victory goes one step further, pairing two insane drummers for thwacking, cracking, and smacking, with occasional found sound provided by a third member on the decks. The resulting wash of sound is clattering, adrenaline-surging, avant-garde noise that sounds like an all-night drum circle getting molested by a jumbo jet. Hot Victory's music won't just make your body sweat—your brain will be dripping bullets, too. You thought drum solos were awesome? Try drum trios. NL