Jack Pollock

target: Zoobomb

Christmas was less than merry for the cyclists known as Zoobombers, whose weekly ride down the zoo hill—on kiddie bikes—was reportedly interrupted by a run-in with a motorist.

As the group was winding down the hill, a car approached from behind and, according to Zoobomb witnesses, tried to weave through the bikers. One of the 'Bombers rode in front of the car to slow it to a stop. The car allegedly bumped the rider, leading to a confrontation. One of the bikers involved, posting to the zoobomb.net forum, claimed the bumping was a "deliberate act of aggression."

At press time, all public accounts have been from the Zoobombers—most note that the biker was riding slowly in front of the car, allegedly in concern for the safety of surrounding cyclists.

Police arrived at the scene, but noted no injuries and decided no further action was warranted. No word yet on potential civil or criminal cases from any parties. RICH MACKIN

same-sex appeal

On Wednesday, December 21, Basic Rights Oregon (BRO) signaled that it was continuing with its challenge to Measure 36 (M36)—the constitutional amendment that bars same-sex marriages—by filing an intent to appeal with the Oregon Court of Appeals.

In early November, Marion County Circuit Court Judge Joseph Guimond sided with the State of Oregon against BRO's challenge. BRO sought to undo M36 by arguing that it was a revision, not an amendment, and that it changed multiple parts of the state constitution—a major no-no. Guimond ruled that the measure did, in fact, make multiple changes, but that the changes were similar enough to not violate the law.

BRO's filing of an intent to appeal is just the first step in a process that could lead to the Oregon State Supreme Court. The organization has not yet filed any appellate briefs and has so far been mum on a strategy of appeal. Arguments will likely be heard some time this summer.

One question that still hasn't been answered by the Supreme Court is whether the Oregon constitution's equal privileges clause applies to marriage benefits—in lieu of actual marriage—for same-sex couples. SCOTT MOORE