Stefan Durham 
Member since Sep 9, 2012


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Latest Review

Re: “Samsara

This movie is amazing and extremely evocative. See it before it leaves theaters--you won't regret it! The Merc's dismissive one-paragraph review (which is totally out of proportion to the epic scale of this production) does not come close to doing justice to this visually stunning, cross-sectional examination of the current world we live in. I can only imagine that the reviewer went into it in a distracted frame of mind.

If you watch Samsara with any degree of openness you will be blown away--I was. There's a performance art sequence in the middle which alone is worth the price of admission. Think Matthew Barney-meets-epic-scale-culture-and-nature-documentary. It really is film-making at its most visually stunning.

7 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by Stefan Durham on 09/09/2012 at 5:00 PM

Recent Comments

Re: “Letters to the Editor

Yummy yummy fluoridation

http://cof-cof.ca/hydrofluorosilicic-acid-…

5 likes, 5 dislikes
Posted by Stefan Durham on 05/16/2013 at 12:16 PM

Re: “Ducklings: Friend to Criminals and Scofflaws the World Over

i love the police department again. thank you, thank you.

0 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Stefan Durham on 05/15/2013 at 4:15 PM

Re: “The Sanest Arguments Against Fluoride...

Adding Fluorosilicic Acid to our public water supply does nothing to address the many deep, systemic issues that have created uneven medical access and nutritional access/education/habits among poor communities. As long as the cheapest and most accessible food is processed, sugary, and nutrient deficient, and as long as our healthcare system is controlled by for-profit interests, health problems like dental caries in poor (mostly minority) communities will continue to manifest, no matter how many additional chemicals we put in the water or air.

I'm reminded of when I used to teach in high schools and saw kids show up daily with nothing but Twizzlers or other candy in their backpacks for breakfast. This is a problem fluoridation CAN'T solve.

What fluoridation DOES do, however, is increase the daily chemical load on our bodies and our ecosystem, proposing a new substance to consume and inject into our biosphere over the long term. Portland's water already has three "sanitizing" agents in it. Is making it even more of a chemical soup really the wise thing to do in this day and age? With a planet and populace already ailing from the widespread and indiscriminate use of chemical agents, we might finally begin to question the wisdom of the "better living through chemistry" panacea, and we can instead begin to consider more sustainable, deeply curative approaches to fundamentally social issues of this type.

Water and air are basic to life, free and necessary to all. Is this not reason enough to protect their purity, and to find more acute solutions to acute problems such as the one fluoridation proposes to "solve?"

9 likes, 4 dislikes
Posted by Stefan Durham on 05/10/2013 at 12:48 AM

Re: “Letters to the Editor

Adding Fluorosilicic Acid to our public water supply does nothing to address the many deep, systemic issues that have created uneven medical access and nutritional access/education/habits among poor communities. As long as the cheapest and most accessible food is processed, sugary, and nutrient deficient, and as long as our healthcare system is controlled by for-profit interests, health problems like dental caries in poor (mostly minority) communities will continue to manifest, no matter how many additional chemicals we put in the water or air.

I'm reminded of when I used to teach in high schools and saw kids show up daily with nothing but Twizzlers or other candy in their backpacks for breakfast. This is a problem fluoridation CAN'T solve.

What fluoridation DOES do, however, is increase the daily chemical load on our bodies and our ecosystem, proposing a new substance to consume and inject into our biosphere over the long term. Portland's water already has three "sanitizing" agents in it. Is making it even more of a chemical soup really the wise thing to do in this day and age? With a planet and populace already ailing from the widespread and indiscriminate use of chemical agents, we might finally begin to question the wisdom of the "better living through chemistry" panacea, and we can instead begin to consider more sustainable, deeply curative approaches to fundamentally social issues of this type.

Water and air are fundamental to life, free and necessary to all. Is this not reason enough to protect their purity, and to find more acute solutions to acute problems such as the one fluoridation proposes to "solve?"

9 likes, 3 dislikes
Posted by Stefan Durham on 05/10/2013 at 12:45 AM

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