Portland's downtown Chinatown moved another step toward getting a major Asian market, a potentially big boost to the area that many Chinese residents and restaurants abandoned thanks to rising rent. Asian grocery Uwajimaya has signed a letter of intent to turn a parking lot on NW 4th and Couch into a city-block-sized food market and 100-unit mixed-income apartment complex. The city has been trying to push forward the $80 million project for two years, but now it's crunch time: to lure the grocery (which currently has stores in Beaverton and Seattle), the Portland Development Commission needs to come up with $10 million in six months. SARAH MIRK

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Metro votes this week on a plan to give money that is usually spent on bike and pedestrian projects to freight projects instead ["Bikes vs. Trucks," News, July 1]. Last week several news outlets picked up on the big business players pushing to hand $18 million in bike/ped funding to trucking. Among the 17 groups who signed a letter arguing for the money swap: Portland Business Alliance, Weyerhaeuser, Fred Meyer, Columbia Sportswear, and Schnitzer Steel. That's a lot of power in one place. Metro's Joint Policy Advisory Committee on Transportation will decide how to split its funding pot this Thursday, July 8. SM

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After a 10-year decline in gasoline use, Oregonians are suddenly fueling up more often. Environmental think tank Sightline released a report last week revealing that gasoline use in Oregon ticked up one percent in 2009, after declining steadily for a decade. The researchers pin the blame for the increase on cheaper fuel prices—but it's possible that public transit cuts are forcing locals to drive more often. The good news? Oregon still uses nine percent less gas than the rest of the country. SM