In a victory for Police Chief Mike Reese, Portland City Council was scheduled on Wednesday, March 14 to formally approve plans for a long-sought police training facility. Under a plan tentatively blessed on March 7, the bureau will pay $6.5 million for a 14-year-old office building on NE Airport Way and then spend $8 million or so more fixing it up. Currently the bureau sends its officers all across the Willamette Valley and beyond to practice things like shooting, driving, and tactical scenarios. The new building—on the bureau's wish list for decades—will put all of that in one complex. DENIS C. THERIAULT

***

Bob Caldwell, the Pulitzer-winning opinion editor of Portland's "paper of record," died Saturday, March 10, of a heart attack. He was 63. But the Oregonian's initial report about Caldwell's death missed a key detail: He wasn't found dead in his car, as a family friend first told the O. No, Caldwell actually died after having sex with a 23-year-old Tigard college student who told Washington County sheriff's deputies he sometimes gave her money to help with her school expenses. To its credit, the Oregonian was first to report the corrected story, posting it online on Monday, March 12. The paper never reported on Caldwell's DUII in 2010. DCT

***

A few days before Caldwell's death, the Oregonian was making national news for a different reason: It was one of a handful of papers to pull a week's worth of abortion-themed Doonesbury comic strips. Why? The strips were too grownup to appear on the "funnies" page. But instead of doing something reasonable (if still prudish), like moving the strips to the editorial pages, the paper decided only to post a link to the questionable strips online. Editors also asked readers to vote in a poll about that decision. As of Monday, March 12, 96 percent of respondents said it was a bad idea. DCT

***

If the second installment of New Seasons workers and labor supporters heading out to protest the firing of a longtime employee says anything, it's that the group is persistent. About 40 or so protesters took to the sidewalk outside the store's SE Division location on Saturday, March 10, protesting on behalf of ex-worker Ryan Gaughan in the gray drizzle and cheering, "It's not about tofu, it's not about rice, it's about workers and their rights." Gaughan was fired from the Seven Corners New Seasons store in early February, accused of not paying for tofu and rice when he went through the register at the store's deli. Gaughan and supporters (dubbed New Seasons Market Workers' Voice), however, see the firing as a move to silence Gaughan and others' advocacy for better working conditions at the branch. The group delivered a petition to the management signed by 700 supporters demanding Gaughan's job back and a new employee disciplinary system. ALEX ZIELINSKI