The Portland Bureau of Transportation has selected local company Alta Bicycle Share as the finalist to run the $4.5 million, 74-station bike-sharing system that's slated to launch in the central city next spring. Alta has set up cheap Zipcar-esque bike sharing in numerous other cities, but ran into major trouble with its New York and Chattanooga projects, whose bike-share systems have been plagued by glitchy software. Those issues are thanks to a messy legal battle between Alta's partner-company on the high-tech bike-sharing stations and the subcontractor that programs the stations' software for processing credit cards and keeping track of bikes. Despite New York's rollout being held up for months, Portland will be hashing out a deal with Alta in the coming months. SARAH MIRK

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There was a police shooting this weekend—but no one died. The fifth Portland Police Bureau-involved shooting in the city this year occurred out at SE 134th on the morning of Saturday, September 29. Two officers were trying to chase down the suspect of an "attempted murder incident." The suspect sped off in a truck, then crashed, and was shot at by police. The cops have yet to report whether their bullets hit the man, but he did sustain "non-life-threatening" injuries, either from the bullets or the crash. STAFF

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One year ago, Occupy Portland first took to the streets for a massive protest. On the one-year anniversary of the local protest, Occupy will be holding a noon rally on Saturday, October 6, in Shemanski Park as well as a teach-in the next day at Portland Community College on North Killingsworth. Meanwhile, protesters arrested en masse at Occupy last year could finally get the jury trials they've been hoping for. The arrested occupiers were originally charged with misdemeanors like criminal trespass, but their crimes were reduced to mere traffic violations—minor infractions the group was scheduled to address in front of a judge last week. But after their lawyers saw a chance to potentially get the group in front of a jury instead, the trials were postponed until mid-October. NATHAN GILLES