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What about Tommy Lee?

With Hollywood in town, Portland is beside itself with girlish glee. Benicio Del Toro has amassed a devout following of dreamy-eyed starlovers, all hoping for a clandestine meeting. That's all good, but what about Tommy Lee Jones? When Del Toro was still a playground runt, Tommy Lee was already on stage and in front of the camera. Jones has been part of 38 films, starring in 33. The following is a list of films that represent Tommy Lee at his finest:

Cobb (1994)--TLJ transforms into a complex beast to portray the legendary ball player Ty Cobb at the end of his life. Convincing a sports writer (Robert Wahl) to "collaborate" in the writing of his memoirs, the ensuing look back reveals a sports hero ravaged by alcohol and his own wretched disposition, unable to sustain any human relationship. As Cobb, Jones draws sympathy for the devil. He takes the audience on a gut-wrenching tour of the dark side, which include stops along the way to remind us he is indeed human.

Coal Miner's Daughter (1980)-- A true rags-to-riches tale: the autobiography of Loretta Lynn. At the tender age of 13, Loretta (Sissy Spacek) leaves impoverished beginnings and marries Doolittle "Mooney" Lynn (TLJ). The two create a small army of children and work towards a common goal: her fame. However, with fame within their grasp, the couple struggle; Loretta's lust for Nashville glory leads to a breakdown and inflicts a near-fatal blow to the marriage.

Lonesome Dove (1989)--A six-hour miniseries, based on a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Larry McMurtry. TLJ and Robert Duvall star as a pair of long-time friends seeking one last cowboy hoo-haw as they approach their golden years. They round up a posse and a herd of cattle, and set out on a 3000-mile cattle drive to Montana. The epic journey is ripe with the soul and sorrow of a well-crafted drama. To best deal with the sad-as-hell parts of the story, whisky, cigarettes and a cozy blanket are highly recommended company.

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